An atheist attack on christianity


#1

zeitgeistmovie.com/

this link was recommended to me by someone on a game I play, part of the movie appears to be cut off in the beginning…the general idea seems to be that christianity is false and based on shoddy historic scholarship.

someone mind coming along and either crushing it into a thousand little pieces to be dissected and proven wrong, or alternatively posting a link to where its already been done?

I personally considering the idea of God not existing and am therefore going to refrain from watching it for the time being lest I be swayed by a convincing argument that doesn’t auctualy hold water.


#2

<< someone mind coming along and either crushing it into a thousand little pieces to be dissected and proven wrong, or alternatively posting a link to where its already been done? >>

All About Horus: An Egyptian Copy of Christ?

crush crush crush, squish squish squish down the garbage some more, to fit more in, crush crush crush, squish squish squish down the garbage a little more to fit more in, crush crush crush, squish squish squish

Zeitgeist movie now looks like about the size of this: :hypno:

I assume you mean Part I. There you go. Good timing, I just logged on the board.

Phil P


#3

Religion and Science can be as compatible as possible at certain times and incompatible at other times.
We must know when to use Science and when not to use it.

Godwin A. Delali
GADEL homepage


#4

Zeigeist movie claims the Egyptian Horus was crucified and resurrected. Turns out his eye was injured in fight with Seth (or Set), but he never died. He became Egypt’s king of the living, while his father Osiris (who did die, and was later revived by Isis) became king of the dead (or underworld).

Now two more promising candidates for a pre-Christian “crucifixion” and “resurrection” are named by Richard Carrier (the atheist/skeptic, historian grad student featured on “Internet Infidels”). I am working on an article now on those two, plus the response to “the devil imitated the prophecy” from St. Justin Martyr. Hope to finish in a few days.

To get to the punchline, Carrier claims the goddess Inanna (of the ancient Sumerians, or Ishtar of the Akkadians/Babylonians) was crucified and resurrected. Turns out Inanna was killed (in the underworld), and was then “hung on a nail [or stake]” or “hung from a hook on the wall.” She was then revived by sprinkling the “food of life” and “water of life” on the corpse, and “Inanna arose.” This all takes place in the “underworld.” Details in my article when done. The “Descent of Inanna” into the underworld is dated to about 1750 BC and is available online (here’s some commentary). Carrier claims this story was familiar to the ancient Israelites because “the weeping of Tammuz” (Inanna’s lover) is mentioned in Ezekiel 8:14.

Another one Carrier likes to mention is Zalmoxis (or Salmoxis, of the Thracians, about 5th century BC). Turns out Zalmoxis never died, but hid himself in an “underground chamber” for three years, then “appeared” to his followers. So there was no death and resurrection. The teaching of the Thracians (like the Greeks) was of the immortality of the soul, not bodily resurrection. Carrier claims the Thracians “believed in the physical resurrection of Zalmoxis” but I don’t see that in the story related by Herodotus (our main source for Zalmoxis). The entire (short) account is in my article.

Phil P


#5

I strongly recommend you read “The Case for Christ,” by Lee Strobel. It’s my favorite book of all time, and it describes thoroughly many powerful objective evidences supporting the truth of Christianity. It’s bound to strengthen your faith. It put many arguments in my pockets that I’ve never forgotten and never heard a nonbeliever effectively refute.

It’s a fascinating and very rewarding read, and will answer many of these questions people raise about Christianity’s origins.


#6

Also, you need to check these essays out. They completely refute any christian-copycat thesis.


#7

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