Anglican church chooses new leader to weather storms


#1

LONDON (Reuters) - Church of England officials met in secret on Wednesday to choose the next Archbishop of Canterbury, a centuries-old role with the modern task of preventing 80 million Anglicans worldwide from splitting over gay marriage and women bishops.

news.yahoo.com/anglican-church-chooses-leader-weather-storms-154844039.html

I would love it if all Anglicans and Episcopalians would reunite with the Catholic Church. Barring that, I hope they can at least find a good leader who is as orthodox as possible that will help them do God's holy will.


#2

I wonder what efforts are actively being made by the Vatican towards bringing them back to the Church.


#3

[quote="Balcerhouse, post:2, topic:299996"]
I wonder what efforts are actively being made by the Vatican towards bringing them back to the Church.

[/quote]

I know that Pope Benedict extended an open hand to all Anglicans who wanted to come back. Doesn't really do much physically, but when the Pope says "we'd be glad to have you," that's something.


#4

The caption from the Reuters article in the OP is a tickler.

Isn't the cat already out of the bag?


#5

[quote="ProdglArchitect, post:3, topic:299996"]
I know that Pope Benedict extended an open hand to all Anglicans who wanted to come back. Doesn't really do much physically, but when the Pope says "we'd be glad to have you," that's something.

[/quote]

I think all the work put into the setup and organisation of the Ordinariate says MUCH more than "we'd be glad to have you"!


#6

No storm where I live. I've corresponded with a few Episcopal priests. They assure me there has been no exodus of churches and very little dissention and they follow and espouse all of the actions taken by ECUSA. When I asked one about homosexuality, she shared with me this story. When she first arrived at the church she shepherds, there was a man who questioned her about Bishop Robinson. The man had been away from church for awhile because of it. She told the man she had no problem with it. She asked if the man believed in one God and in Jesus. When the man said yes, the priest said well so do !. So just because we disagree on homosexuality does not mean we can not be part of the same worshiping family. And she told me for 8 yrs since their conversation the man has been to church every wk since.


#7

[quote="LoyalViews, post:5, topic:299996"]
I think all the work put into the setup and organisation of the Ordinariate says MUCH more than "we'd be glad to have you"!

[/quote]

I totally agree with you. The Catholic Church is doing a lot to welcome Anglicans and Episcopalians into the Catholic Church. :thumbsup:


#8

The Anglican church already seems divided in Australia, one of the many reasons I’m becoming Catholic. :slight_smile:


#9

Is someone being voted off the island?


#10

[quote="Holly3278, post:1, topic:299996"]
news.yahoo.com/anglican-church-chooses-leader-weather-storms-154844039.html.

[/quote]

Whoa! Santa Claus was the Archbishop of Canterbury?!


#11

[quote="Julia_Mae, post:10, topic:299996"]
Whoa! Santa Claus was the Archbishop of Canterbury?!

[/quote]

Well that explains the lump of coal last year.


#12

[quote="LoyalViews, post:5, topic:299996"]
I think all the work put into the setup and organisation of the Ordinariate says MUCH more than "we'd be glad to have you"!

[/quote]

Yes, I would say the Catholic Church has taken this quite seriously.


#13

[quote="CMatt25, post:6, topic:299996"]
No storm where I live. I've corresponded with a few Episcopal priests. They assure me there has been no exodus of churches and very little dissention and they follow and espouse all of the actions taken by ECUSA. When I asked one about homosexuality, she shared with me this story. When she first arrived at the church she shepherds, there was a man who questioned her about Bishop Robinson. The man had been away from church for awhile because of it. She told the man she had no problem with it. She asked if the man believed in one God and in Jesus. When the man said yes, the priest said well so do !. So just because we disagree on homosexuality does not mean we can not be part of the same worshiping family.

[/quote]

Well doesn't she sound warm and understanding. Of course she told you that there was no dissention. Does she keep up with the news at all? She would not be accepted into the Church as a priest so I would say this is a pretty biased opinion based upon self-preservation.


#14

[quote="SteveVH, post:13, topic:299996"]
Well doesn't she sound warm and understanding. Of course she told you that there was no dissention. Does she keep up with the news at all? She would not be accepted into the Church as a priest so I would say this is a pretty biased opinion based upon self-preservation.

[/quote]

Yes seems very warm and understanding. She's actually one of the people I'm giving some consideration to being a possible Christian spiritual advisor. And her small church, not wealthy at all it seems to me financially. They worship in their very modest parish hall. Provide an awesome outreach where the needy can come for food, meals, and clothing several days a wk at no charge. Not like a thrift store shop with a nominal fee. I absolutely love that. She told me she always keeps some donated clothing back in her office because the homeless know they can always come in anytime she is in her office. And I'm sorry I realize I wasn't clear. The priests I've corresponded with have assured me of no dissention in their diocese. She was actually baptized in the Catholic Church and reared in it in her early upbringing but decided to be confirmed Episcopalian at the time of age for Confirmation. Actually another of the Episcopal priests I've corresponded with was actually a Catholic priest in the Roman rite but left to become an Episcopal priest. He seems very warm too. Even though he knew my mother was not Episcopalian, when she was homebound in her later yrs, he offered to have Episcopal Communion brought to her. Though I did not take him up on the offer at the time, I've always and to this day thought that was extremely nice. I've also corresponded with a non Episcopalian but Protestant pastor who too was Catholic. Peace.


#15

The cat is decidedly not out of the bag. But the cat may be in the bag either at Buck House or at No. 10. There are some interesting candidates. I think I would most prefer Richard Chartres, Bishop of London. I like John Sentamu as well. You can read up on the candidates at layanglicana.org/blog/


#16

[quote="ProdglArchitect, post:3, topic:299996"]
I know that Pope Benedict extended an open hand to all Anglicans who wanted to come back. Doesn't really do much physically, but when the Pope says "we'd be glad to have you," that's something.

[/quote]

Yes. It cut off the excuse I'd been making for some years that the Pope really wanted people like me to work for corporate reunion.

Edwin


#17

[quote="CMatt25, post:6, topic:299996"]
No storm where I live. I've corresponded with a few Episcopal priests. They assure me there has been no exodus of churches and very little dissention

[/quote]

That's the party line. I'm sure they really believe it, because it's probably true where they are. More conservative areas have suffered much more than more liberal ones.

Edwin


#18

[quote="CMatt25, post:14, topic:299996"]
Yes seems very warm and understanding. She's actually one of the people I'm giving some consideration to being a possible Christian spiritual advisor. And her small church, not wealthy at all it seems to me financially. They worship in their very modest parish hall. Provide an awesome outreach where the needy can come for food, meals, and clothing several days a wk at no charge. Not like a thrift store shop with a nominal fee. I absolutely love that. She told me she always keeps some donated clothing back in her office because the homeless know they can always come in anytime she is in her office. And I'm sorry I realize I wasn't clear. The priests I've corresponded with have assured me of no dissention in their diocese. She was actually baptized in the Catholic Church and reared in it in her early upbringing but decided to be confirmed Episcopalian at the time of age for Confirmation. Actually another of the Episcopal priests I've corresponded with was actually a Catholic priest in the Roman rite but left to become an Episcopal priest. He seems very warm too. Even though he knew my mother was not Episcopalian, when she was homebound in her later yrs, he offered to have Episcopal Communion brought to her. Though I did not take him up on the offer at the time, I've always and to this day thought that was extremely nice. I've also corresponded with a non Episcopalian but Protestant pastor who too was Catholic. Peace.

[/quote]

:thumbsup:


#19

[quote="Contarini, post:17, topic:299996"]
That's the party line. I'm sure they really believe it, because it's probably true where they are. More conservative areas have suffered much more than more liberal ones.

Edwin

[/quote]

Could be the area. Roman Catholics or at least their clergy here appear more conservative overall than I'd been used to previously. But that might just be the growing case with Roman Catholicism in general. Just today it was explained to me the USCCB is much different than even just 8 yrs ago. Maybe though in my area the Episcopalians are less conservative. I also know one of their churches has 4 weekend services ranging from acoustic guitar and piano to traditional rites and a contemporary Christian band. Another has a jazz Sat service and has 2 traditional on Sun and has just recently added another on Sun. Even the very small Episcopal church I referenced with the outreach shows a growing trendline on the spreadsheets the priest has been keeping she told me. .


#20

Read more at christianpost.com/news/church-of-england-committee-fails-to-choose-new-archbishop-of-canterbury-82397/#Hf4SfcyveESIij0I.99


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