Anglican Church?


#1

Would Roman Catholics regard the Anglican Church as closer in communion to the Catholic Church than say, a church that swears has no loyalty to tradition at all and interprets the Bible their own way?(example: Independant fundamentalist Bible churches).

In other words, are some Protestant Churches more Catholic than others? :smiley:


#2

…the church of england…

IMHO


#3

Yes it does. Anglicans (especially those of a “catholic” cast) are closer theologically to Rome than Lutherans; Lutherans are closer than Methodists; Methodists closer than Baptists; Baptists closer than Jehovah’s witnesses . . .


#4

The simple answer is yes. mind you the takeover of anglicanism in europe and North america by its low church wing - women/homosexuals in vestments etc. makes it more “protestant” than in the past


#5

[quote=mercygate]Yes it does. Anglicans (especially those of a “catholic” cast) are closer theologically to Rome than Lutherans; Lutherans are closer than Methodists; Methodists closer than Baptists; Baptists closer than Jehovah’s witnesses . . .
[/quote]

That doesn’t quite make sense… Methodists are direct descendents of Anglicans, and share most of the Articles of Religion. Theologically… one is very hard pressed to find theological differences between Anglicans and Methodists.

O+


#6

Space ghost, I am literally laughing out loud! What part of KY are you from, btw?

I’ve heard it stated before that the Episcopal/Anglican church has “all the ceremony of Catholicism minus the guilt.” The High Church Anglicans are very close to Catholicism though.


#7

obviously i want everyone to know the fullness of Truth in the Catholic Church. But i would MUCH rather have someone be Southern Baptist than Episcopal or liberal Lutheran! At least Southern Baptists still believe in morality!

The Church of England is a disgrace to God. They use the name of Christ to promote homosexuality, abortion, etc etc.


#8

[quote=UKcatholicGuy]obviously i want everyone to know the fullness of Truth in the Catholic Church. But i would MUCH rather have someone be Southern Baptist than Episcopal or liberal Lutheran! At least Southern Baptists still believe in morality!

The Church of England is a disgrace to God. They use the name of Christ to promote homosexuality, abortion, etc etc.
[/quote]

The Episcopal Church USA, the Episcopal Church of Canada, and perhaps the Church of England, are peppered with apostates and liberals. However even in those countries many Anglicans remain faithful to fundamental Christian doctrine, tradition, the Creeds, etcetera–think of Forward In Faith, Continuing Anglicanism, the various smaller Anglican bodies which have sprung up in protest over the sorts of issues you raise, and so forth. Worldwide, the Anglican communion is much more conservative than perhaps you realize. It is helpful to recognize this and not over-generalize.


#9

there are estimated 70 million anglicans worldwide,perhaps 5 million are liberal or unorthodox,and almost all of those are in u.k. and n.america.the rest of anglicanism around the world is c.s. lewis type of orthodox anglicanism. in christian unity,celt


#10

[quote=flameburns623]The Episcopal Church USA, the Episcopal Church of Canada, and perhaps the Church of England, are peppered with apostates and liberals. However even in those countries many Anglicans remain faithful to fundamental Christian doctrine, tradition, the Creeds, etcetera–think of Forward In Faith, Continuing Anglicanism, the various smaller Anglican bodies which have sprung up in protest over the sorts of issues you raise, and so forth. Worldwide, the Anglican communion is much more conservative than perhaps you realize. It is helpful to recognize this and not over-generalize.
[/quote]

New to site so excuse me if this is not proper format.
I am here to learn about converting from Anglican to Catholic. My father was catholic and my mother baptist and I was raised going between churches and ended up Episcopalian because it was in the middle, had the mass and creeds and things I loved. This worked well until the Episcopal Church took turns I feel violate the scripture and cannot abide by. I have tried other churches but miss the sense of tradition, mass, communion etc. I have been told I cannot receive communion in the Catholic Church so I am somewhat lost as to where I belong. In a Church I do not totally have faith in where I can participate in Holy Communion or ? It is a very important matter to me. I once talked with a Preist , about 30 years ago and as I was divorced needed to do the annulment papers and go in front of a tribune. I have heard that some of these regulations are somewhat easier now. To my question can anyone out there direct me to where I can learn the answers to my problems. If I could become a Catholic inspite of divorce or where I can go to find a church that celebrates Communion and Mass but does not go against the scriptures. Our Episcopal Church splintered off into an Anglican branch but it is heartbreaking to see our small broken family and they have moved from our area. Thank you for any help anyone can be… God Bless, t


#11

[quote=mcgregor6]New to site so excuse me if this is not proper format.
I am here to learn about converting from Anglican to Catholic. My father was catholic and my mother baptist and I was raised going between churches and ended up Episcopalian because it was in the middle, had the mass and creeds and things I loved. This worked well until the Episcopal Church took turns I feel violate the scripture and cannot abide by. I have tried other churches but miss the sense of tradition, mass, communion etc. I have been told I cannot receive communion in the Catholic Church so I am somewhat lost as to where I belong. In a Church I do not totally have faith in where I can participate in Holy Communion or ? It is a very important matter to me. I once talked with a Preist , about 30 years ago and as I was divorced needed to do the annulment papers and go in front of a tribune. I have heard that some of these regulations are somewhat easier now. To my question can anyone out there direct me to where I can learn the answers to my problems. If I could become a Catholic inspite of divorce or where I can go to find a church that celebrates Communion and Mass but does not go against the scriptures. Our Episcopal Church splintered off into an Anglican branch but it is heartbreaking to see our small broken family and they have moved from our area. Thank you for any help anyone can be… God Bless, t
[/quote]

Hi McGregor:

Very shortly, or perhaps even as I am posting, someone will point you to some proper links. Please note that I am a traditionalist Anglican and not a Roman Catholic. On this forum, in another section, there are extended threads and other information regarding the process for petitioning for an annulment (‘declaration of nullity’) . You might note that it is not actually ‘divorce’ which would be the bar as it would be a remarriage. If you have never remarried, or you are now single for whatever reason–your divorce would not be an issue so long as you understand that if you were to remarry in the future you would have to first obtain a declaration of nullity. Other possibilities include an Eastern Orthodox Church, which would not disbar you solely on the grounds of a divorce. Obviously you have considered the possiblity of a ‘Continuing Church’ or similar Anglican communion. A long shot would be an “Old Catholic” or a “Polish National Catholic Church” congregation–both schisms from the RCC which usually accept divorced people more readily. Both schisms are very small and may not have any congregations in your area.

So far as becoming Roman Catholic–there are OTHER differences between the RCC and Anglicanism, beyond the issue of divorce and remarriage. A convert to the RCC would have to be catechised–taught the fundamental beliefs of Roman Catholicism. You might want to start by first obtaining and reading a copy of the Catechism of the Catholic Church and then contacting the local diocese. Explain the whole problem–that you are a divorced Anglican considering conversion to the RCC. They should be able to recommend to you a priest with sufficient background in Anglicanism to confront the appropriate issues during your catechesis. (They may simply recommend that you contact your local RCC parish priest).


#12

[quote=mcgregor6]New to site so excuse me if this is not proper format.
I am here to learn about converting from Anglican to Catholic. My father was catholic and my mother baptist and I was raised going between churches and ended up Episcopalian because it was in the middle, had the mass and creeds and things I loved. This worked well until the Episcopal Church took turns I feel violate the scripture and cannot abide by. I have tried other churches but miss the sense of tradition, mass, communion etc. I have been told I cannot receive communion in the Catholic Church so I am somewhat lost as to where I belong. In a Church I do not totally have faith in where I can participate in Holy Communion or ?
[/quote]

Come home to the Fullness of Truth, the Catholic Church!

I’m glad to see you’re searching for the Truth. Seek and you shall find.

To answer your question about where you can go to receive Holy Communion, the short answer is simply The Catholic Church. See, Holy Communion is the reception into our bodies of the body, blood, soul and divinity of Jesus Christ, under the appearance of bread and wine. When a Catholic priest consecrates the bread and wine, they are no longer bread and wine (only appear to be) but are the body and blood, soul and divinity of Our Lord. Only a priest with valid ordination has the God-given power to do this. Otherwise, without valid ordination, the “priest” may go through the motions and say “the right words”, but it remains simply bread and wine. The only two Churches with valid ordination are the entire Catholic Church and the Orthodox Churches. Anglicans had valid ordination several hundred years ago, but cease to today. Therefore, unless you attended Holy Communion at either a Catholic or Orthodox Church, you would NOT be receiving Jesus Christ-- only a litt ebread and wine!

Now the question is, how do you receive Communion (real, valid communion) at a Catholic Church since you’re divorced? It’s not as hard as you may think. And this isnt about going through rules and regulations, it’s about repsecting Our Lord in the Eucharist. We don’t want to blaspheme Him (as St Paul warns us in 1 Cor) by receiving Eucharist in the state of mortal sin. So, here’s what i recommend:

  1. contact a local Catholic Church with a good reputation for being faithful to Rome, and inquire about joining RCIA. It’s unfortunate that you have to church shop within the Catholic Church to find a parish that actually teaches what the Church teahces, but thats the state of affairs these days.
  2. Go through RCIA. Talk with the RCIA director throughout the process and raise any concerns you have.
  3. If you come to believe the Catholic Faith during RCIA, then you will be initiated into the Church! You will go to confession and confess your divorce.
  4. But here’s the hard part: even after you confess your divorce and God has forgiven you, you need to make sure you’re not living in sin with another person (sorry, i dont know if youre male or female by your username). Meaning, even though you were divorced, God doesnt recognize divorce, so you’re still married in His eyes (and the eyes of the Church until the Church, if it oes, annuls the marriage). Therefore, if you’re re-married, that would be considered adultery and you would not be able to reveive communion so long as you continued in an intimate relationship (until your previous marrige is annulled, if it is at all).
  5. So, if you are remarried, you and your new spouse will need to live as brother and sister until your previous marriage is annulled. That is, you must end any sexual relations of any sort. You literally live as a brother and sister would. You get the idea. If you do that, you can receive Holy Comunion (barring any other mortasl sins). Bottom line, you cant receive Holy Communion in the state of mortal sin. You must go to confession first.

I know it might be tempting to go to the Orthodox Church to receive Communion since they apparently have a more relaxed “policy” on divorce. But keep this in mind: God doesnt change His standards for each Church. If it’s a sin for you to receive Holy Communion in the Catholic Church in your current condition, it also is if you receive in the Orthodox Church (whether they tell you or not). Just means the Catholic Church is more faithful to God’s Law. Also, although the Cath Church recognizes the Orthodox Church’s Communion as valid, you should keep in mind that even the Orthodox Church is a splinter of the True Church, the Catholic Church. They just happen to be a schismatic Church that’s retained a good 98% of Truth.

I know it sounds difficult, but all things are possible woth God! The Eucharist is worth the wait! The fullness of Truth in the Catholic Church is worth the wait! We’re waiting on you wioth open arms!

May the Lord guide you, bless you, and keep you. You’re in my prayers.

In Christ,
UKCatholicGuy


#13

[quote=UKcatholicGuy]Come home to the Fullness of Truth, the Catholic Church!

I’m glad to see you’re searching for the Truth. Seek and you shall find.

To answer your question about where you can go to receive Holy Communion, the short answer is simply The Catholic Church. See, Holy Communion is the reception into our bodies of the body, blood, soul and divinity of Jesus Christ, under the appearance of bread and wine. When a Catholic priest consecrates the bread and wine, they are no longer bread and wine (only appear to be) but are the body and blood, soul and divinity of Our Lord. Only a priest with valid ordination has the God-given power to do this. Otherwise, without valid ordination, the “priest” may go through the motions and say “the right words”, but it remains simply bread and wine. The only two Churches with valid ordination are the entire Catholic Church and the Orthodox Churches. Anglicans had valid ordination several hundred years ago, but cease to today. Therefore, unless you attended Holy Communion at either a Catholic or Orthodox Church, you would NOT be receiving Jesus Christ-- only a litt ebread and wine!

So, here’s what i recommend:

  1. contact a local Catholic Church with a good reputation for being faithful to Rome, and inquire about joining RCIA. It’s unfortunate that you have to church shop within the Catholic Church to find a parish that actually teaches what the Church teahces, but thats the state of affairs these days.
  2. Go through RCIA. Talk with the RCIA director throughout the process and raise any concerns you have.
  3. If you come to believe the Catholic Faith during RCIA, then you will be initiated into the Church! You will go to confession and confess your divorce.
  4. But here’s the hard part: even after you confess your divorce and God has forgiven you, you need to make sure you’re not living in sin with another person (sorry, i dont know if youre male or female by your username). Meaning, even though you were divorced, God doesnt recognize divorce, so you’re still married in His eyes (and the eyes of the Church until the Church, if it oes, annuls the marriage). Therefore, if you’re re-married, that would be considered adultery and you would not be able to reveive communion so long as you continued in an intimate relationship (until your previous marrige is annulled, if it is at all).
  5. So, if you are remarried, you and your new spouse will need to live as brother and sister until your previous marriage is annulled. That is, you must end any sexual relations of any sort. You literally live as a brother and sister would. You get the idea. If you do that, you can receive Holy Comunion (barring any other mortasl sins). Bottom line, you cant receive Holy Communion in the state of mortal sin. You must go to confession first.

I know it sounds difficult, but all things are possible woth God! The Eucharist is worth the wait! The fullness of Truth in the Catholic Church is worth the wait! We’re waiting on you wioth open arms!

May the Lord guide you, bless you, and keep you. You’re in my prayers.

In Christ,
UKCatholicGuy
[/quote]

UKCatholic Guy, thanks for the response, facts & encouragement. I’m female was married at 16 & again before 20. My age & maturity and good sense seemed to be lacking. My present husband & I have been married for 14 years. I didn’t know that the Communion (Episcopal) was not considered true Communion in the Catholic meaning. Communion and the intensity which I believed in it gave me much comfort and a feeling of closeness with our Lord.
I spoke to a Preist about 25 years ago about converting to Catholism. I was given annullment paperwork buy was too embarrassed at the mess I had made.In my 50’s I feel an urgent need to set things right. As if God is pulling me toward him and the Catholic Church. I’ll have to make that leap of faith in the process & education I need. When reading about the new Pope. I felt as if he were mirroring my concerns for women and many things and would be proud to be a part of a Church that takes God’s word seriously instead of changing it to suit todays standards as the Episcopal Church.On receiving communion in a Catholic Church I once attended one for 3 years. I got my courage to discuss my concerns with the preist he told me that that if I felt at peace and being called to Communion and had made my confessions to God that he had no problem with my receiving communion & I did (This was 20+years ago) The knowledge I’m learning have shown me I should not expect this Sacrament without taking the proper steps and knowing it is right. I am moving to another state in a couple of weeks.One of my first stops in my new home will be to sign up for classes & meet with a Preist to find out where I really stand & if my call to Catholism can be. I believe God will lead me and somehow this will all work out. Again thank you.
Tricia


#14

to megregor6
re:

New to site so excuse me if this is not proper format.
I am here to learn about converting from Anglican to Catholic.

I dont know what city you live but perhaps if you live in a city that has an Anglican Usage Catholic Church. You might want to check them out. Here is the parish I belong to and the priest is a convert from the Anglican Church and is now fully Catholic.
www.atonementonline.com
You may want to look at the links. Of course if you want more info you can send them an e-mail. The OLA Church was the first to be set up in this manner.


#15

[quote=space ghost]…the church of england…

IMHO
[/quote]

My sentiment exactly…


#16

Megregor6:

TobyLue’s advice about looking for an Anglican Use parish is probably the best advice - The Priest there will understand the issues relating to converting from Anglicanism to Catholicism, and how it’s a larger series of steps for some than others, because he’s just made the journey!

The link he gave is a very good one. Here are some others:

walsingham-church.org/otherparishes.htm
walsingham-church.org/
stmarythevirgin.org/

locutor.net/ (St. Athanasius in Boston, MA)

locutor.net/others.htm

pastoralprovision.org/congregations.html

If any of those are within an hours drive of your home, I believe it’s worth the drive because the Mass will be largely familiar to you and the priests and people will understand the issues you’re dealing with.

If they aren’t, please try the suggestion of trying two of three of the local parishes in your area. In my area, checking to see if the “Holy Water Fonts” have Holy Water in them (you can see that when you try to bless yourself with the sign of the cross as you enter the Church), locating the Blessed Sacrament (Front of the Church or in exile somewhere in the side) and seeing if the Priests sticks to an approved Eucharistic Rite (Rite 1 is the old Roman Rite most Catholics grew up with and is to be prefered) are as good tests as any.

I will say that full “Holy Water Fonts” + Blessed Sacrament in the center behind the main alter + Rite 1 = BINGO!

Priests who’s doing the above are generally doing it because they love the Lord. They will also be hearing more confessions and doing more teaching, because that’s what the Congregations who want those things tend to demand.

Unlike the priests who aren’t doing those things, they’ll be expecting people to approach them who want to convert.

If all else fails, go to your local parish and talk to the people at EWTN.

Regarding divorce, I don’t believe that DIVORCE alone is a bar to receiving the Eucharist or even being received into the Catholic Church. The problem would occur if you had been REMARRIED and your first marraige had been not yet been held to be NULL and VOID by the Catholic Authorities (it’s a practical consequence of the power to bind and loose).

That’s the reason it’s important to talk to a Priest and maybe even a Bishop.

I hope this helps.

May God richly bless you. Michael


#17

[quote=Psalm45:9]My sentiment exactly…
[/quote]

Psalm 45:9 & Space Ghost:

On that topic (LIke I can talk - I’m in a LIFEBOAT called the TAC wondering when the SS ROME is going to pick us up)

RECTOR DENIES UNIQUENESS OF CHRIST’S SALVATION MESSAGE FOR HUMANITY

Special Report - By David W. Virtue

*WASHINGTON, DC–The Rector Emeritus of All Saints Church, Pasadena, California told hundreds of Episcopalians at Washington’s National Cathedral recently that he could no longer think about Jesus as the only way to God and to a saving faith.

“I simply refuse to hold the doctrine that there is no access to God except through Jesus. I personally reject the claim that Christianity has the truth and all other religions are in error. Unfortunately, this is the position of the new Pope, Benedict XVI, who says salvation is only possible through Jesus Christ. I think it is a mistaken view to say Christianity is superior to Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, and Judaism and that Christ is the only way to God and salvation. I’ve given my life to a different Jesus,” said the Rev. Dr. George F. Regas.

He was speaking on the occasion of the installation of the new Dean of Washington National Cathedral the Rev. Samuel Lloyd.

“How one comes into a relationship with God has taken on a meaning that it did not have in my younger years.”

“I can no longer think about Jesus as the only way to God and to a saving faith. How one comes into a relationship with God has taken on a meaning that it did not have in my younger years.”

Jesus said, “I am the way, and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father (to God) except through me.” If my reflections on this verse are to have integrity, I must speak as though my close rabbi friends and my Muslim colleagues are sitting right there in a pew in front of me. Those good people in whom I’ve seen the glory of God."

Regas said he simply refused to hold the doctrine that there is no access to God except through Jesus.*

virtueonline.org/portal/modules/news/article.php?storyid=2548

I once posted on the "Working Theology of ECUSA. This is part of that. During the same service, they read a section of the Holy Koran in place of the Old Testament Reading. According to Islam, that Cathedral is now a Mosque and can be claimed as such at any time.

These people have NO idea what they’re doing - but, They’re leading the sheep astray nonetheless.

May God Richly Bless those who act to save HIs Little Ones. Michael


#18

MOre on the anglican Church - This from BRAZIL!

As Eye See It : “What is right & fair?”

by Miguel Uchoa
26th May 2005

*As I write these remarks I am not doing it to communicate only a personal view of the facts and history of the situation, I represent here the whole Diocese of Recife. Behind me there are thousands of faithful Anglicans

Anglicanism, as a part of the world wide church was, and is strongly affected by each of these events… But probably nothing has affected Anglicanism in the last 3 decades more then liberalism.

Until 1949, evangelicalism was the primary vision, but changes started around 1960 through the influence of ECUSA and the WCC. Clergy were sent to the USA to liberal seminaries, with offers of scholarships, and a growth in publications etc… Less then one decade was enough to takeover the whole church and liberalism has dominated it since then.

Today we, as a Diocese in Recife, with our orthodox position and clear evangelical faith are an isolated body in the Province of Brazil. For the Brazilian province and for us, Christianity seems to be two different things:

  • For them, the Bible is not the word of God, nor His primary means of revelation …for us it is.

  • For them, the Church is a social and cultural environment where moral and ethical issues should not be discussed

  • For us, Church is a community for the transformation of society. Spiritually, morally, ethically, and socially, we work to restore creation to the image of God through Jesus Christ.

  • For them Faith is an expression of the spirit of the age… and the multi-faith vision is accepted. Jesus is just part of God’s revelation
    ,
    but never the only one…

  • For us, Faith is our only reason to live, faith in Jesus Christ alone as Saviour and Lord…

  • For them ecumenism should be broad and includes all creeds and religions. Recently we became aware of one bishop in Brazil attending voodoo cults …

  • For us, ecumenism is a relationship with those who profess their faith in Jesus Christ as the only son of God, and the only Saviour…

  • For them, evangelism is a very horizontal teaching of the justice in earth. One must never help someone of another faith come to Jesus…this would be totally wrong.

  • For us, evangelism is the proclamation of the good news of God, to the whole human being and to all human beings. It is good news by bringing people to the faith in Jesus Christ

  • For them sexuality is a personal subject. Hetero, or homo-sexual are equally suitable for the church and for the clergy and there is nothing considered sinful in this matter…The biblical standards are not relevant… Because for them the Bible is not relevant

  • For us, homosexuals are loved by God and should be loved by all of us, but we teach that this is an attitude that goes against the will of God, as shown in His Word…

I could keep giving you more and more significant differences that today we find within the Province of Brazil.

In the end we come to a point where we have… two churches, two different and two different visions of God almighty … is it right and fair that we will be judged by those same people who totally disagree with our orthodox doctrinal positions, and have historically oppressed the evangelicals?

The Brazilian province depends financially on the ECUSA and Canada. Over 40% of the province budget comes mainly from these two churches. The Episcopal church of Brazil is largely an “empty pews” organisation. It is a tiny church and the only denomination that is not growing in Brazil today. There is little hope for the near future. The exception is the Diocese of Recife. By the grace of God, in the church of the Holy Spirit where I am the rector, there are probably more active members than in
any single diocese in the whole province. 6 of the 7 bishops in the province voted against Lambeth Resolution 1.10 The ordination of gays and lesbian priests in Brazil today, is a regular practice. There is no bishop, beside Cavalcanti that has not ordained an openly gay or lesbian priest in recent times.

Is it right and fair that the unique and only part of the Church in
Brazil that is growing and staying faithful to Anglicanism today, is to be judged by those who are in steep decline and acting against the Anglican Communion guidelines?*

anglican-mainstream.net/news05052602.asp

Pray for the embattled Diocese of Recife - That they say “Enough!” and either join us in the LIFEBOAT or simply make the Trip to Rome themselves.

May God bless those those who save His Little Ones. Michael


#19

And for the COMIC RELIEF!

Trinity Wall Street Like So Totally Loses It

anglican.tk/fun/epfract2.gif

This entry was posted on Saturday, May 28th, 2005 at 2:17 pm and is filed under ECUSA, Communion Matters. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

badnews.classicalanglican.net/?p=61

And this in my e-mail from Virture OnLine:

*And at TRINITY WALL STREET in New York City, the Rev. James Cooper, rector of the celebrated Episcopal sanctuary at Broadway and Wall St., (also the single richest church in the world) greeted worshipers last Sunday in some highly unorthodox vestments – a checked red-and-white clown suit, red fright wig, rubber nose and large floppy shoes. Then, in
what was almost surely the most unusual church service most
parishioners ever experienced, he presided at a “Clown Eucharist” that included circus music during the opening procession, a mimed sermon, jugglers and outlandishly dressed ushers blowing soap bubbles at worshipers.

To encourage people to get in the mood, ushers handed out noisemakers and big red noses to everybody, but only a few of the 450 or so worshipers, among them several dozen tourists, wore any clownish accoutrements. “I’m self-conscious about doing that kind of thing in church,” one woman said. “We are fools for Christ’s sake,” said the rector. Sorry rector, you are just plain fools. In his previous church, in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., he fired up chain saws and rode motorcycles down the aisle to make sermon points. Oh, God.*

Well, that’ll clear that Church out! It was too full anyway! Empty Pews! Must have Empty Pews! Then, NO one will notice the Gospel ISN’T being preached!

Blessed are they who act to save God’s Little Ones. Michael


#20

[quote=Traditional Ang]Psalm 45:9 & Space Ghost:

On that topic (LIke I can talk - I’m in a LIFEBOAT called the TAC wondering when the SS ROME is going to pick us up)

[/quote]

I’m sorry, I know it was not right for me to label all Anglicans on that boat, you are lucky that you were able to find a life boat before the Titanic sank.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.