Anglican Use Mass


#1

I’ll be attending a Solemn Mass of the Anglican Use this Sunday. Has anyone been to one of these? What can I expect as far as how the people participate, as compared either to an OF or EF Mass? Any tips in general?

I’ll also be going to Confession at that church. I’m assuming that rite will be the same.


#2

It will probably feel like a very “traditional” OF Mass. It will probably be a very high quality liturgy. The majority of it will probably be in English, with perhaps a few Latin parts. Most likely the Eucharist will be celebrated facing ad orientem. Vestments, architecture, music, etc., will probably all be quite beautiful. Likely expect incense. I wouldn’t be surprised to see two deacons instead of the usual one we Romans see. Communion will likely be distributed under both Kinds, but kneeling at a rail. (!)


#3

[quote="SammyJankis90, post:1, topic:305360"]
I'll be attending a Solemn Mass of the Anglican Use this Sunday. Has anyone been to one of these? What can I expect as far as how the people participate, as compared either to an OF or EF Mass? Any tips in general?

I'll also be going to Confession at that church. I'm assuming that rite will be the same.

[/quote]

In keeping with Anglican practice, the congregation are welcome and encouraged to sing the hymns.

If you're used to the English of the OF, you may caught a bit off-guard with the language, which is likely to be hieratic English. So, just keep in mind:

V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with thy spirit (not your).

At the Preface:
V. Let us give thanks to the Lord our God.
R. It is meet and right so to do (I almost slipped up here the first time with "to do so").

The Lord's Prayer may proceed immediately to "For thine is the kingdom..."

Grab a missallette to keep your place. You will notice some very beautiful prayers from the Anglican tradition, notably the Collect for Purity, the Summary of the Law, the Bidding Prayers, Penitential Rite, Comfortable Words, Prayer of Humble Access and Thanksgiving.

You may kneel longer and more frequently than that at the OF. Communion is likely to be at a rail and under both kinds. Communion on the tongue is likely to be the norm, communion in the hand likely permitted.

From your location, I assume you will be celebrating from the Book of Divine Worship, so it may differ from the manner of celebration at St. John the Evangelist up here in Calgary, which uses a Rome-corrected English Missal (an Anglican translation of the Roman Missal in use in 1958), so some common EF practices are used here which may or may not be used where you are:

[LIST]
*]At the Gloria, bows at the name of Jesus, at "we worship thee", "we give thanks to thee for thy great glory", and "receive our prayer." Sign of the cross at the Gloria's conclusion ("with the Holy Ghost").
*]At the Creed, full genuflect/kneel (not just bow) at "And was incarnate by the Holy Ghost of the Virgin Mary: And was made man." Sign of the cross at "And the life of the world to come."
*]Communion is offered as "The Body of our Lord Jesus Christ which was given for thee preserve thy body and soul unto everlasting life" and "The Blood of our Lord Jesus Christ which was shed for thee preserve thy body and soul unto everlasting life." There is no response from the communicant.
*]The "Lord I am not worthy" is said three times as in the EF.
*]There is a Last Gospel.
[/LIST]


#4

I didn't end up going this week, unfortunately.

How do they give out the Precious Blood at an altar rail? Seems like it could be tricky, depending on how high the rail is.


#5

[quote="SammyJankis90, post:4, topic:305360"]
I didn't end up going this week, unfortunately.

How do they give out the Precious Blood at an altar rail? Seems like it could be tricky, depending on how high the rail is.

[/quote]

I have received the Precious Blood in this way and it's much more secure than receiving standing because one's mouth is level with the chalice, and you don't need to touch it.


#6

So then the minister pours the Precious Blood into your mouth?


#7

It’s very easy. The communicant may need to lightly touch the base to help stabilize the chalice and provide sensory feedback on the chalice’s movements but the minister has a good grip and angle. I take a very light sip, no more than a few drops. The chalice never changes hands

And goodness, no the precious Blood is never poured.

I don’t really relish the idea of touching as I’m a layman and not a subdeacon but I know it’s out of necessity and is not a matter of doctrine so I can live with it.


#8

[quote="SammyJankis90, post:1, topic:305360"]
I'll be attending a Solemn Mass of the Anglican Use this Sunday. Has anyone been to one of these? What can I expect as far as how the people participate, as compared either to an OF or EF Mass? Any tips in general?

I'll also be going to Confession at that church. I'm assuming that rite will be the same.

[/quote]

I've been weekly attending an Ordinariate Parish in my local diocese. I am amazed with their liturgy and spirit, and being a former High Church Anglican myself, I am familiar and glad to live among all the good parts of the Anglican Patrimony. I highly recommend it. I am discerning registering with the Ordinariate, again being a former Anglican.


#9

As narrated to me, after the Second Vatican Council, many High Church Anglicans abandoned the English Missal and adopted the modern Roman Missal in its official English translation but with a difference from the Catholic practice: the Anglicans actually did it right (ad orientem, chant, incense, maniples, etc.)


#10

I haven’t been to a liturgy in person, but I did -]stay at a Holiday Inn Express/-] watch a video of nearly an entire liturgy on Youtube. It looked wonderful. It seems to combine a lot of my favorite things about the Ordinary and Extraordinary Forms of the Mass - the EF’s solemn tone (ad orientem, secret prayers, Communion kneeling and on the tongue, etc) with the pastoral benefits of vernacular liturgy and hymnody.


#11

I concur.


#12

My wife and I attended Mass at an Anglican use parish about 6 months ago. It was much as was described above in the first couple of posts, though with no Latin. Communion at the rail under both kinds worked well, though it did take a bit longer than what I was used to, it wasn’t a concern for me. All it did was allow more time for hymns, which were particularly good at the Church. High Church Anglican music has always been beautiful and frankly, we would do well in the Catholic Church to start using more of it. Anyway, I am getting off topic.

The rest of the Mass will likely seem beautiful to you, if a bit odd and hard to follow. Whether it is in modern English or more classical English depends on if they are celebrating Rite I or II of the Solemn High Mass.

If I were located in an area with such a parish, I would strongly consider joining.

Peace,


#13

Some Anglican Use parishes only give the Body of Christ, others use intinction, which is wholly done by the priest.

Rite II is no longer allowed to be used in Anglican Use and Ordinariate parishes. This makes me happy, as I attended the only AU parish that used it and found it a mish mash of the OF and some of the Anglican prayers. Also Latin was used for the Gloria, Sactus etc. There were several books one had to use to follow the Mass and it was very confusing. I believe the priest was from England maybe he felt more comfortable using Rite II.

I am anxious to see what the revivsed liturgy will be.

I attend a small Ordinariate parish and although they must use a Catholic Church, they have done a wonderful job of putting up a temporary altar to face Ad Orientem, including the Last Gospel of John.

There is much kneeling and bowing, however after one or two visits it is very easy to follow.

Yours in the Hearts of Jesus and Mary

Bernadette


#14

Blessed John’s really is a lovely place. :wink:


#15

You are really blessed to be near an Anglican Ordinariate parish. There is none in our area. On the plus side, we attend an NO parish where the priest celebrates the Mass with great reverence. My only wish is that the hymnody were a better standard. I really miss Anglican church music, especially the chanted Coverdale psalter.


#16

But how many times in the Anglican church can you find the chanted Coverdale psalter? A sad commentary.

[quote="Aidan12, post:15, topic:305360"]
You are really blessed to be near an Anglican Ordinariate parish. There is none in our area. On the plus side, we attend an NO parish where the priest celebrates the Mass with great reverence. My only wish is that the hymnody were a better standard. I really miss Anglican church music, especially the chanted Coverdale psalter.

[/quote]


#17

I know this is a few weeks old, but I saw that the OP is here in Houston, at least some of the time, so I wanted to let him know that if he plans on attending at Our Lady of Walsingham, our local Anglican-Use parish, Communion is given by intinction, so it is not allowed in the hand.


#18

The only thing I don’t like about the Anglican Use is that the pews in Anglican Churches are built so you perch your bum on the seat as you kneel, and that posture doesn’t feel right to me, and so kneeling up is very uncomfortable (at least for me).

Apart from that :wink: I enjoy the liturgy a great deal.


#19

Hmmm, I used to attend an Anglican church, and I remember the pews and kneelers being just like those in the Catholic church. I wonder if that is unique to Canada, or maybe my church was unique.

The one church I’ve been to that kind of had what you are describing is St. Patrick’s in NYC. The pews are so narrow, it is very difficult to walk past someone when they are sitting. You could easily lean back on the seat when kneeling, but it’s not difficult not to.

I think it’s because people were a lot smaller in the old days.


#20

I grew up in the Episcopal church and the pews were no different than the ones in Catholic churches. In fact the one I belonged to as a child had cushions on every pew.

Since I have never been in a CoE, nor one in Canada I have no idea if they are different than in the US.

The one difference when attending an Anglican Use Catholic Mass is that unless it is a low Mass, they do last longer than the OF.

I am attending both an OF parish and a Anglican Use parish. Of course the AU parish is just beginning and has a small congregation. We meet in a Catholic church and hopefully someday will be able to have a building of our own.

Yours in the Hearts of Jesus and Mary

Bernadette


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