Annulment needed?


#1

There is a woman that some of my friends are trying to set me up with.

She is a non- denominational Protestant (for now, God willing) who was previously married. The man divorced her. She was cheated on and she gave opportunity to reconcile, but the man decided to pursue divorce and now they are and have been for about 2 years.

Is she still married in the eyes of the Church or does the Church recognize the divorce as an Annulment?

If not viewed as an Annulment would she need to get one from the Church before I would be morally allowed to date her?


#2

[quote="katholikos12, post:1, topic:326232"]

Is she still married in the eyes of the Church

[/quote]

Yes.

[quote="katholikos12, post:1, topic:326232"]
or does the Church recognize the divorce as an Annulment?

[/quote]

No. A divorce and a decree of nullity are not the same thing. A civil divorce decree does not dissolve a valid marriage or enable the divorced person to remarry.

[quote="katholikos12, post:1, topic:326232"]
If not viewed as an Annulment would she need to get one from the Church before I would be morally allowed to date her?

[/quote]

Yes.

She would have to have grounds for a decree of nullity. One does not simply go "get" an annulment. Infidelity is not grounds, per se.

She should talk to the pastor of the local Catholic Church.

You should not date a married woman.


#3

If her first husband was Catholic, her first marriage was invalid, and a decree of nullity should not be hard to obtain; otherwise I believe it is presumed valid. But personally I would never date a Protestant unless I were reasonably certain that she was going to become Catholic; and even then I'd have reservations.


#4

[quote="Ad_Orientem, post:3, topic:326232"]
If her first husband was Catholic, her first marriage was invalid, and a decree of nullity should not be hard to obtain;

[/quote]

There is nothing in the OP's post that would substantiate this assumption. It is entirely possible for her to have validly married a Catholic.


#5

Thank you for the replies.


#6

[quote="1ke, post:4, topic:326232"]
It is entirely possible for her to have validly married a Catholic.

[/quote]

That's true, she could have been a Catholic herself before becoming non-denom, in which case a marriage to a Catholic would likely have been valid. Otherwise not.


#7

[quote="Ad_Orientem, post:6, topic:326232"]
That's true, she could have been a Catholic herself before becoming non-denom, in which case a marriage to a Catholic would likely have been valid. Otherwise not.

[/quote]

She could have validly married a Catholic even if she was never a Catholic herself. I am not sure why you are under the impression a non-Catholic cannot validly marry a Catholic.


#8

shes a non-catholic who got married to a non-catholic.


#9

[quote="katholikos12, post:8, topic:326232"]
shes a non-catholic who got married to a non-catholic.

[/quote]

She is validly married until proven otherwise through the Catholic tribunal process.


#10

So how would one who is Catholic start dating this person?

Because she has absolutely no desire (or knowledge that she should) to get an annulment -- shes a protestant.

BTW i'm speaking hypothetically now, I would/will never pursue someone the Church views as married to another.


#11

[quote="1ke, post:7, topic:326232"]
She could have validly married a Catholic even if she was never a Catholic herself. I am not sure why you are under the impression a non-Catholic cannot validly marry a Catholic.

[/quote]

You're quite right. I forgot about the dispensation. :blush:

One good reason for people with marriage issues to consult priests and/or canon lawyers. Maybe the poster was hoping to find one on here. I'm just a simple layman.


#12

A Catholic should not start dating this person. She is a married woman.

Which is why a Catholic should not date her.


#13

[quote="1ke, post:12, topic:326232"]
A Catholic should not start dating this person. She is a married woman.

Which is why a Catholic should not date her.

[/quote]

Hi 1ke,

I always appreciate learning from your posts - would it make a difference if either or especially both were non-baptized?


#14

[quote="CatholicServant, post:13, topic:326232"]
Hi 1ke,

I always appreciate learning from your posts - would it make a difference if either or especially both were non-baptized?

[/quote]

It would make a difference, possibly, in the declaration of freedom to marry. In such a case, one of the dissolution of the bond processes could be an option in addtion to the declaration of nullity process.

But it would not make a difference in her freedom until she submitted it to the Church. Until she is declared free to marry, she isn't girlfriend material.


#15

Thank you.


#16

If you both decided you were interested in dating, she would first have to meet with your priest to determine whether there is a case for annulment. There is no harm in being friends and getting to know one another as long as it is clear that you can’t pursue romance at this stage and possibly never will be able to.


#17

thanks! and nice to see another **former **evangelical here :)


#18

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