Any Kindle users considering the new Kindle Fire?

Anyone thinking of going from Kindle to Kindle Fire? Why? Why not?

Curious . . .

My current Kindle does what it does very well. Don't really feel the need for color or a touch screen. Plus, if I upgraded to a Kindle Fire, I would undercut my own mental rationalization for the iPad, which is what I really want. (RIP, Steve.):(

I’m still waiting for the full-color e-ink version of the Kindle to come out. :o I don’t think the technology is there yet. Maybe someday…

It seems like it’s basically Amazon’s answer to the iPad. I’ve never been an early adopter. I like to wait until it’s been out for a bit so they can work out the kinks and I can read some substantial reviews. It may be time for me to get a regular Kindle, though. :slight_smile: Those have dropped in price again. Now you can get a basic one for $79. When they first came out, weren’t they $400?

I pre-ordered a Kindle Fire yesterday. I like many of its features. Web browser. I can access Facebook, e-mail. I have a lot of kindle books now that I have to use a Kindle reader on my PC to access. I also shop at Amazon and buy books and other items from Amazon. I like the free 2 day shipping you get after you buy the Fire. And there are a lot of apps (Android, I think). Also movies, TV shows and music, can be downloaded and viewed or listened to.

That is why I ordered the Fire.

I am tempted . . . but I also like to wait and hear the experiences of others.

When I got my Kindle, my husband tried to talk me into getting an ipad. I didn't want to spend that much, and I just wanted to read books.

I guess I have to decide if I still just want to read books!

What I want to know is if you will be able to view Netflix instant streaming on the Kindle Fire. I have read that Barnes & Noble has a new Nook Color 2 coming that will allow instant viewing, plus it has an SD slot that can expand the memory another 32gbs. Spec wise, the 2 may be equal. I dunno, though. You can get dizzy checking out all of the tablets!

Although I'm not considering buying one, I am keeping an eye on things and I am excited about what the Kindle Fire could mean.

I have a Kindle with keyboard, and am absolutely thrilled with it. It's great for reading books. That's what I want to do, and that's why I have a Kindle; to read books. That might sound a bit obvious, but my point is that I don't use a Kindle for anything else. I don't need or want MP3 capability, web browsing, crossword puzzles, movies, or anything else that only gets in the way of using my Kindle to just-plain-read-books.

Despite a lot of hype we've seen since it was announced, I don't think the Kindle Fire will be a true contender in the tablet market. The Fire's primary purpose is as a portal for Amazon content; not just ebooks but movies, music, and a good selection of apps available from Amazon. The interface is (or "will be" since it hasn't been released yet) heavily weighted to Amazon content. In other words, it will be am Amazon device that just happens to do most of what other tablets will likewise do. In contrast, other tablets are meant primarily to do whatever a tablet can do, and Amazon content just happens to be a part of that. That's a long way of saying that the Fire will have a lot of limitations and users will often run up against the "you can't do that on a Fire" problem.

There are also a lot of users out there who want tablets for different reasons and ebooks, or watching movies might not be a high priority--nice to have but not primary. I think a lot of them will be turned-off by the fact that the whole interface is heavily weighted toward Amazon content instead of being more open to whatever each user's priorities might be.

Will Amazon allow other e-readers to be installed on the Fire? I can't say for certain, but I do doubt it. All the apps have to come from the Amazon app store, as opposed to most other Android tablets that access the Android Market, or some other more open market that doesn't care which ebook reader or movie viewer, or whatever else, a user has installed.

The part that does get me excited is the price, even though the price itself comes with some drawbacks. For example, the advertised $199 price for the current Kindle Fire includes "special offers" which is a euphemism for the fact that Amazon is going to fill the user's experience with lots and lots of unwanted (and no-doubt intrusive and questionable on the privacy aspect) advertising that will make the whole thing "just plain annoying" to use, much the same way that so many users were turned-off by AOL's constant and annoying advertising. We know what happened to them once other easy options became available to people. They might make a Kindle Fire available without the advertising, as they do the other Kindles, but this will certainly come at an added cost, and that means that price-comparisons between the Fire and the competition will not be in the Kindle's favor as much as this might seem at first-glance. $200 for a 7-inch tablet looks like it will corner the market at first, but if the no-ad version costs $300 then Amazon's lead, in terms of price, has just shrunk a bit.

The good news on price is that at $200 many people who might be considering a tablet but who don't want (or can't) invest $500 or more will be more inclined to get a Kindle, and as the Kindle sales soar that just might cause the other tablet makers to drop their prices and that will be great for consumers. Even though comparing a Kindle Fire to (let's say for example) an iPad or a Xoom, isn't quite an apples-to-apples comparison, I think they're going to sell a boatload of these things, and that will make everyone else take notice. I think they'll cut into competitors sales only slightly while at the same time having a huge impact on getting new customers who want more than just an ebook reader, but are willing to settle for a little less than a full tablet.

I think they're going to be very popular and they'll do a lot to introduce new customers to the tablet experience. But I think that in the long run these will be a sort of "my first tablet" product until moving on to something else more versatile and less restricted to Amazon content and advertising. So in the long run, I think they'll go far in making tablets even more popular than they are today.

As for me personally, I don't think I want one. I have my Kindle keyboard for reading ebooks. It does exactly what I want, and does it well. It stays charged for almost a month, it's easy on the eyes, and (very important) I'm not constantly cleaning finger prints off the touch screen.

My concern with the Kindle Fire is that it will do too much, and this will be to the detriment of actually reading books. I have an iPad and I like that. It serves its purpose for so many different things, but it's not very good for reading ebooks heavily (and I'll stress that I mean heavy reading). The battery doesn't last as long as the e-ink screen, it's heavy, and the backlit screen is not comfortable for long periods of reading--good in a pinch but not for the kind of reading that I do on a day-by-day basis (although great for short term travel). In other words, "the right tool for the right job" I'll probably get a new e-ink Kindle when the time comes, and I'll probably get a new full tablet when the time comes, but I cannot see myself getting a Kindle Fire as a replacement for either.

FrDavid96 - great answer!! Thanks. :thumbsup:

[quote="Timothysis, post:6, topic:258550"]
What I want to know is if you will be able to view Netflix instant streaming on the Kindle Fire. I have read that Barnes & Noble has a new Nook Color 2 coming that will allow instant viewing, plus it has an SD slot that can expand the memory another 32gbs. Spec wise, the 2 may be equal. I dunno, though. You can get dizzy checking out all of the tablets!

[/quote]

I doubt it will play nice with Netflix. It seems more likely to me that Amazon will use it to push their own Netflix-esque streaming feature that is available to all Amazon Prime members. For ~$80 a year (in contrast to ~$96 a year with Netflix), you can stream pretty much the same crop of second-rate movies and kiddie shows. :p Plus you get the free 2-day shipping.

Fr. David, I did not realize that the Kindle Fire could possibly have advertising on it. That is a deal breaker for me. I guess that I will just wait to see what the Rook Color 2 will be like. There is a rumor that Amazon will be previewing a 10 inch tablet soon…I’ll be curious about that, too.

You are probably right. I have, with Netflix, been reacquainted with The X Files, though, and have really been enjoying watching it again. It has been so long since I have originally seen them that I barely remember any of it (am I getting old? No, it can’t be!!!). How could I have forgotten about Special Agent Dana Scully?!?!? The Nook 2 is really holding my attention right now, though.

I’ve been thinking about getting one, but I’m still not sure. I have long ago decided that the main reason why I would ever get a tablet would be to read digital comics (because it would be cheaper and take up less space than buying regular comic books), so this looks like it might be a good thing for me. I’ve done a few quick calculations and it looks like my savings on comic books and regular books should equal the $200 price tag in less than a year, so my return on investment looks good too.

Still, I need to spend more time researching other uses so that I’m not getting this thing and wasting most of the functions. I also need to spend some time thinking about whether I really need a kindle or whether the way I’m getting things now is fine as it is. For example, am I really going to watch that many movies on it if I don’t watch a lot of movies any way?

I’m trying to find exactly where I saw that about the ads… It’s not on the Kindle Fire page as of today, but it might be somewhere else on the Amazon site. If I find it I’ll post it because I don’t like saying things like that w/o being able to back them up.

I would guess that they will keep the same system they have on the current Kindles, where they offer the advertising version at one price and the no-ads version at another. If you’re still looking into the Fire, I wouldn’t dismiss it just yet. The no-ads version (if indeed they make one) might still be a good deal.

B&N doesn’t have quite the downloadable multimedia library that Amazon has (ok, nowhere near it), so the Nook color might be even more limiting. Of course, we won’t know until it comes out.

Shipping costs were one of the reasons I decided to get a Kindle a year ago. I was tired of either paying the shipping for a book I really wanted, or having to find other books to get to the $25 minimum to get free shipping. The other nice thing about ebooks is that they’re never out-of-stock, as long as the book even exists in e-format. That’s my biggest complaint, that a lot of what I want to buy just isn’t available. It’s getting better by the day though.

Further, ebooks are either cheaper or the same as paperbacks (I’ve never seen one cost more–sometimes the 3rd party or used sellers have the physical book for less), so there’s some long term savings there too. I haven’t compared prices on comics. What did you find? More, less, or about the same? I know you said you’ll save money, but I’m curious about the comic prices specifically.

But what about funding your retirement by selling all those comic books for a small fortune when you’re in your 60s? Can’t do that with e-comics.

What you say about the movies is a big part of the overall discussion here. Amazon is banking on the fact that if you do buy a Kindle Fire, sooner or later you’ll start buying movies from them–even if it wasn’t your intention from the start. That’s what separates the Kindle Fire from the other tablet makers. The other tablet makers will certainly try to steer you in a certain direction, that of buying content from them or their partners. But with an iPad, Galaxy or a Xoom, the user still has the option of dealing with other sources. The Kindle Fire gives Amazon such a huge advantage for music and movies and even Android Apps, that it’s probably safe to say that most users will end up buying a lot of Amazon content, no matter what their intentions at first.

I did think about shipping. I have free shipping with Amazon Student (or something like that), but only until March. Shipping was a bigger factor with the comic books, which I order online from another vendor, but for a slightly different reason. In order to not pay as much, I have my books sent once a month, which means that even though certain books came out yesterday, I have to wait until the last Friday of the month to read them. Getting digital copies will let me get them earlier.

Further, ebooks are either cheaper or the same as paperbacks (I’ve never seen one cost more–sometimes the 3rd party or used sellers have the physical book for less), so there’s some long term savings there too. I haven’t compared prices on comics. What did you find? More, less, or about the same? I know you said you’ll save money, but I’m curious about the comic prices specifically.

The comic are something that I have to look into a bit more. Amazon and DC have some sort of deal. Right now only certain graphic novels have been specified, but it’s likely (although I’m not sure, still researching) that the comics from DC’s digital store will work with this thing. So, assuming that this is true, I will save two dollars per book as the physical books are $2.99 and the digital ones are $.99. I haven’t really thought about how this would work for Marvel, but I don’t really read Marvel.

But what about funding your retirement by selling all those comic books for a small fortune when you’re in your 60s? Can’t do that with e-comics.

The reason why certain comics like the original Action Comics #1 (from the 1930’s) are so valuable is because they are rare and iconic. The new Action Comics #1 (from last month) wouldn’t get me a lot of money. Several of the comics from the “new 52” (Fifty-two #1’s that came out last month) have already gone through multiple printings, so there are to many of them to make it likely for me to make a large profit.

What you say about the movies is a big part of the overall discussion here. Amazon is banking on the fact that if you do buy a Kindle Fire, sooner or later you’ll start buying movies from them–even if it wasn’t your intention from the start. That’s what separates the Kindle Fire from the other tablet makers. The other tablet makers will certainly try to steer you in a certain direction, that of buying content from them or their partners. But with an iPad, Galaxy or a Xoom, the user still has the option of dealing with other sources. The Kindle Fire gives Amazon such a huge advantage for music and movies and even Android Apps, that it’s probably safe to say that most users will end up buying a lot of Amazon content, no matter what their intentions at first.

Like I said, I don’t really watch a lot of movies.

Oh, I don’t doubt what you say.

I just mean that the general trend will be that people who might not intend to buy Amazon movies when they buy a Kindle Fire, will probably find themselves doing this sooner or later–just a general observation (or ‘prediction’ might be better), not directed at your own preferences.

That’s what Amazon is counting on (counting all the way to the bank). At least that’s how I see it. Let’s say I buy a Xoom tablet, for example. I might never use the thing for movies. I might never want to. If I don’t go out of my way to download a movie app, or try a pre-installed one, I can pretty much ignore the fact that the tablet can be used to watch movies. If I do decide to watch movies, I’ll do my own research and pick my own favorite service, regardless of which one the tablet manufacturer favors. The difference with the Kindle Fire though is that Amazon has much more control over what the user does and sees compared to how much control Motorola has over the Xoom user. Substitute any other manufacturer’s name for Motorola. I don’t think even Apple’s advantage with the iPad (of steering customers to use iTunes) will match Amazon’s potential for ongoing content sales, because the iPad is still open to content from other sources–something not likely for the Kindle Fire, not to the same degree.

I don’t know exactly how the Fire will work, but strictly for conversation, let’s say that every time I turn on the Fire, or every time I wake it from sleep mode, the Fire will automatically show me the fact that I can buy movies; maybe even show me some movie suggestions based on the books that I buy. This isn’t all that far fetched, so it’s not as if I’m writing a science fiction novel by imagining such a possibility. After a while, I’ll be likely to finally start buying movies from Amazon, even though at the time I bought it my intention was just to use it to read ebooks. Just for example, a few weeks ago I bought a ebook on Amazon. Sure enough a few days later when I logged on to their webpage, it was suggesting the movie version to me. This is just an obvious example, but the point is that Amazon knows how to keep their customers buying, and I think they’ll multiply that potential by selling Kindle Fires and following up on that with content sales.

That’s what Amazon is counting upon by offering the Kindle at such a low price. Motorola wants to sell tablets, and that’s the source of their profit. Once the sale is made, they’re pretty much finished. Amazon on the other hand wants to sell books and movies and all kinds of other digital content. Even if they sell their Kindles at cost (or even below), they’re still poised to make a profit in the long run, and keep doing so. We see the same thing with cell phone service. They’re more than happy to give you a free phone because they know they’ll make a ton of money by selling you monthly service. The cell companies keep your business by locking you in to a contract. Amazon will do it with the power of persuasion and by giving their own content such a significant advantage over content from other sources.

I hope no one misunderstands me here. I’m excited about the new Kindle Fire even though I still prefer to keep my e-ink Kindle. I’m excited because I think it’s realistic to hope that if the Kindle Fire sells well, it will bring the cost of other tablets down somewhat. A few other companies have tried low-cost tablets in recent months, but they just don’t have the publicity potential that Amazon has–they have millions of customers visiting their webpage every day and seeing the Fire displayed prominently. Here we are on CAF discussing the upcoming Kindle. How many CAF threads have we seen about the Lenovo IdeaPad that’s currently selling for $199? I did a quick search and the answer is none. By that I mean that other companies have tried low cost tablets, but they haven’t been very successful. The Amazon Kindle has the potential to be the first low-cost tablet that’s actually going to make an impact–and I think it will be significant, even if it’s not a direct competitor to the current king of the hill, the iPad.

I think the Kindle Fire will be “just right” for a lot of people, and I think it will likewise benefit those who don’t own one by bringing down the cost of other tablets, if even just a little.

-]You’ve got my curiosity here. I tried to check DC’s digital store for downloadable comics, but all I could find were movies. Can you provide a link to the store. It’s probably right in front of me, but I just can’t find it on their webpages./-]

Cancel that. I found it.

I tried to download a comic to see if it would work with the Kindle, but no luck. I got to the point where I could view a comic online but not download any (I tried a free one). What’s the file extension on one that you already have? Better yet, can you share a link to one of the download comics that’s a free sample?

I have never downloaded any comics. If I had then there would be no point in calculating the money I would save once I start doing it. Right now I’m buying the physical books because I like to shift positions a lot while I read and it’s too much of a bother to do that with a computer (although it would be a different story with a tablet).

I’m a bit confused. It sound like you’re saying that you have not yet tried digital comics, but you’re looking into it. Did I get that?

What I’m trying to figure out is the same thing you posted above, whether or not "the comics from DC’s digital store will work with [Kindle].

I’m trying to do a little “research” or maybe an “experiment” to see if that will work. I went to the DC store and I was able to read a few free sample comics on the computer using the web browser. However I could not actually download a file–not even a free sample. If you can give me a link to a comic I can try it to see if it works on the Kindle, or try other options. Since I only tried free samples, I don’t know what happens when one purchases a comic–does that mean you can go to the DC webpage and read it again, or does it mean that they allow you to download a file and keep it on your harddrive the same way we purchase mp3?

I get the fact that you’ve never actually bought a digital comic; I’m just asking for some links so I can try it on my end (although instead of purchasing one, I’ll look for a free sample version).

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