Any Married Priests in your Parish?


#1

If you have any married Priests in your Parish, would you please tell us about them, how you feel, how they are doing, the advantages and disadvantages, their families, etc. I would just like to know. It would be interesting reading for all, I am sure. There are no married priests in my area.


#2

We do not have a married priest, but we do have a priest (who will soon be our pastor) who HAS been married. He was widowed, and is a very proud grandfather. We love him.

**You may be surprised that this wonderful priest is NOT in favor of a married priesthood. He knows the pressures of married life, and the pressures of being a priest. **


#3

We do have a married priest in Columbia, although not in my parish. He is pastor of a small (100 families) church downtown which converted from Episcopalean about twenty years ago. He is a retired military chaplain and, from what I have heard, is doing a very good job with his parish. The couple of times I have attended mass there, I was not impressed with his homilies, but the service itself was very orthodox (for Anglican rite).


#4

None. We’re very much Latin rite, and the priests that we’ve had are all celibate. Very holy men, especially our first parish priest.


#5

My most dear friend is a layicized (sp?) priest who officiated at our mariage. We also have married ( i.e. ex-Episcopalian) priests in the diocese. I don’t have a problem with it. Celibacy is a discipline of the Church. Married priests? OK Female priests? No.


#6

[quote=geezerbob]We do have a married priest in Columbia, although not in my parish. He is pastor of a small (100 families) church downtown which converted from Episcopalean about twenty years ago. He is a retired military chaplain and, from what I have heard, is doing a very good job with his parish. The couple of times I have attended mass there, I was not impressed with his homilies, but the service itself was very orthodox (for Anglican rite).
[/quote]

As I’ve been taught all my life: Priests are Catholic, Rabbis are Jewish, Ministers and Reverends are Protestant.


#7

[quote=brotherhrolf]My most dear friend is a layicized (sp?) priest who officiated at our mariage.
[/quote]

I didn’t know that a layicized priest was allowed to officiate at a Catholic Wedding. Is this valid in the eyes of the church?

I too know a priest who was married and has become a priest after being widowed. His kids (adults now) are not practicing Catholics (nor was he for many years) and I seem to remember him saying they weren’t quite certain what he was doing becoming a priest. He left a thriving business and a very “successful” life behind and he couldn’t be happier.

CARose


#8

Reverend is used for Catholic priests, as in the Reverend Father Sean Knox or Reverend John A Hardon S.J.


#9

[quote=Church Militant]Reverend is used for Catholic priests, as in the Reverend Father Sean Knox or Reverend John A Hardon S.J.
[/quote]

Yes, I’ve heard that used. And I keep hearing Protesant ministers calling them selves ‘Father’ and wearing the Roman Collar, instead of the full protestant collar.


#10

Our pastor, a former Episcopalian priest, is married. He is a holy man, a faithful orthodox Catholic, and a good pastor.


#11

Could you also say which Rite you are in? Especially if you do have married priests?

From my understanding the Latin Rite of RCC does not have married priests but the other rites of RCC (Byzatine Rite, Eastern Rite, etc) do have married priests.
It’s also my understanding that a priest cannot GET married in those rites, but if he is a married man he can become a priest. But if his spouse were too pass then he is to live a life of celibacy after that.
So if the Latin Rite decided to allow married men to become priests the current priests could not get married. Most Latin Rite priests do not want marriage. They are married to the church. God chose them the Vocation of a Celibate life.
God chose me the Vocation of a Married life (yes marriage is a vocation).
I’m part of the Latin Rite. We do not have married priests in our area. Like I said it’s my understanding that the Latin Rite does not allow married Priests, but the other Rites do.


#12

[quote=Fidelis]Our pastor, a former Episcopalian priest, is married. He is a holy man, a faithful orthodox Catholic, and a good pastor.
[/quote]

We are in a Latin Rite parish. Actually, our pastor first came into the Church in the Byzantine Rite, and switched to the Latin Rite later.


#13

No married priests. We once had one who was widowed, he became a priest after his wife died. Lots of married Deacons :slight_smile:


#14

[quote=Fidelis]Our pastor, a former Episcopalian priest, is married. He is a holy man, a faithful orthodox Catholic, and a good pastor.
[/quote]

:smiley:


#15

[quote=AmberDale]Could you also say which Rite you are in? Especially if you do have married priests?

From my understanding the Latin Rite of RCC does not have married priests but the other rites of RCC (Byzatine Rite, Eastern Rite, etc) do have married priests.
It’s also my understanding that a priest cannot GET married in those rites, but if he is a married man he can become a priest. But if his spouse were too pass then he is to live a life of celibacy after that.
So if the Latin Rite decided to allow married men to become priests the current priests could not get married. Most Latin Rite priests do not want marriage. They are married to the church. God chose them the Vocation of a Celibate life.
God chose me the Vocation of a Married life (yes marriage is a vocation).
I’m part of the Latin Rite. We do not have married priests in our area. Like I said it’s my understanding that the Latin Rite does not allow married Priests, but the other Rites do.
[/quote]

The Latin Rite DOES allow for married priests, though only through special exception. Many, I believe it’s somewhere on the order of 800, married Anglican priests have been allowed to convert to Roman Catholicism (Latin Rite) and are parish priests. I do not know any, but I know they are out there.


#16

[quote=Kevin Walker]As I’ve been taught all my life: Priests are Catholic, Rabbis are Jewish, Ministers and Reverends are Protestant.
[/quote]

High-church Protestants (Lutherans, Episcopalians, etcetera) use the term ‘Reverend’. They also often wear the Roman collar. Typically it is easier to ditinguish Catholic ministerss from Protestants by the cross they wear–few Protestants wear crucifixes, most Catholic priests do. No iron-clad rule about that, either.


#17

[quote=Kevin Walker]As I’ve been taught all my life: Priests are Catholic, Rabbis are Jewish, Ministers and Reverends are Protestant.
[/quote]

Priest and Reverend are Catholic. Although you are correct about “Minister” being a Protestant title, the word minister is not exclusively theirs. Minister to a Protestant is something someone is and minister in the Catholic faith is something someone does.

We don’t have any married priests in my Parish but surprisingly, our new priest went to my high school. It’s nice to have a young priest. Although it’s sometimes hard to forget that he was a popular senior football player when I was a freshman!


#18

We have a married priest in our parish. He lives with his wife and family. He was an episcopalion first. He is a wonderful priest and does a lot of talks for young people. He has a lot of experience being married and all. this is in columbus ohio:


#19

Since this thread popped up again after 3 years, I’ll mention a married priest of our diocese. Here’s a nice article about him which I found, oddly, on a Episcopalian listserver: (but he was formerly Episcopalian.)


#20

Happy new year X3 everyone.

That was a nice article, JimG. Interesting that he is a parish marriage counselor.

So far there doesn’t seem to be any negativity at all regarding married Catholic priests, except perhaps from the priest himself.


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