Any plans what t give up for lent?


#1

I am just curious if anyone knows what they plan to give up (or take on) for lent?
I plan to give up Pepsi (all pop really). I drink alot of it, close to 2 litres a day. I have tried to quit before, but I am addicted. I know that God will give me the will to stop cold turkey. I have been drinking Pepsi for about 20 years now and the longest I have gone without it is maybe a week. (I probably owns shares by now). When I am done with lent, I don’t plan to start drinking it again.

What about children? I have just started to talk to them about it. This will be their first time (7-8-15) so I want it to be something fairly easy so they don’t feel like they have failed. They don’t eat desert or eat junk food (suprising considering my Pepsi addiction). What about making their bed EVERY day?

I’m not sure, I am just looking for ideas.

Tara


#2

Politics: Political radio, the political forum here, my political posts on Facebook, other peoples’ political posts on Facebook, and political conversations (that, I’m afraid will be the most difficult for me).:o


#3

I know my mother liked to encourage doing things as well as giving up something, like candy, TV ( the one show we were allowed to watch), etc. She also did something that really helped us focus on the spirit of Lent and thinking about it…she bought a bag of hard beans, painted them purple, and every time we did something sacrificial, ( doing the dishes with out being asked, not fighting over a toy, etc.) we got to put a Lenten bean in the jar, on Easter morning it turned into a jar of Jelly beans! :bounce: We always tried to fill the jar full every year…:slight_smile:


#4

One year I tried giving up breathing. I'll never do that again!


#5

My mom always encouraged me to do something for others as well. And she also has Sunday be our “day off”. This year I think I will up negativity. I’m so negative about myself and men that it drives me nuts. I won’t become Susie Sunshine (some realism is key). And for adding, I will start looking into convents (so that voice telling me to keep looking will be quiet). :slight_smile:


#6

[quote="CountrySinger, post:5, topic:185230"]
My mom always encouraged me to do something for others as well. And she also has Sunday be our "day off". This year I think I will up negativity. I'm so negative about myself and men that it drives me nuts. I won't become Susie Sunshine (some realism is key). And for adding, I will start looking into convents (so that voice telling me to keep looking will be quiet). :)

[/quote]

Way to go hun! :bowdown2:That is awesome! I discerned for a minute or two...:rolleyes: It sounds like you have a great Lent ahead of you. And as for sarcasm, guys like a bit of pepper in the sugar...it means your smart! ;)


#7

You’re looking for ideas… so I will share on some of the things I have done in the past.

When I was a kid, I typically did the ‘no candy for lent’ thing.

I also have gone without meat (same as on Fridays) for lent. However, I can’t do that now for medical reasons… the doctor ORDERED me to eat meat! :eek:

I have done the ‘make your bed everyday’. That was a good one. I took the time that I used to make the bed as a mini-prayer time.

One year I gave up television, because it is so much a part of my life… but I will NEVER do that again, unless I kill someone’s grandmother in front of them on Christmas morning!::thumbsup:

But I have found the ‘taking on’ to mean more (for me)

I have worked in a soup kitchen twice a week for the season (giving alms to the poor)

I tried to read the Deuterocanonical (Catholic) books of the Bible. I got through Tobit. (That would make a great movie!) :slight_smile: but I have not completed the others.

I said I would do the Purpose Driven Life, but then, there are some things about the book (I have done the book before, about 4 or 5 years ago, I think) that make me wonder how in line it is with the Catholic Church. Until I know better, I don’t want to get into it when I don’t have the strong enough foundation.

I live alone, so one year, I said I would set the table every night to eat dinner and eat at the table, but I don’t spend that much time at home any more.

I think that Lenten challenges should be something to help you to build a stronger relationship with God. Not eating candy, or drinking pop, while they are challenging… I’m not sure that you get anything from them. For kids, though, it’s a big start.:stuck_out_tongue:


#8

I recently heard this quote - “God is in the pots and pans.” - St. Theresa of Avila. I HATE to clean even more than I LIKE to eat chocolate or ice cream! So, I have decided to see God all over my house and visit with Him as I clean. It is also a private penance. I will probably give up a favorite food, too - out of habit - but, a healthy one, because I usually manage to keep not eating it even after Lent is over - for a while anyway!


#9

I’ve been thinking this year about giving up either: internet (with the exception of email or anything work-related that’s necessary), soda, or clothes shopping.


#10

That’s not a bad idea! I may have to adopt that as well.

I usually go no sugar and vegetarian for lent. I will probably do so again this year. I haven’t gone full out vegetarian like I have before (not since I was married, anyway) but I think I will again. I am a HUGE meat-lover, and so it is a big sacrifice for me. I think that if I make vegetarian chili and things like that, my husband won’t mind too much. :slight_smile: Or I’ll just let him fix box afer box of mac and cheese for himself…:wink:


#11

I'm going to try to give up gossip, judging people before I know them, being irritated by thoughtless neighbors and to pray for them.

I'll get in the habit of reading the bible daily, volunteer more at church and pray for our priests and for more vocations.


Protect all human life from the womb to the tomb!


#12

I plan on giving up all junk food, desserts, and any mini-meals between the big meals. And tasty drinks too, besides water and milk.

Somebody above said they used to give up meat for Lent! :eek: I might have to do that… I am a meat addict, so that would be a pretty intense penance. :slight_smile:

Besides that my friend and I are going to pray the Rosary at lunch rather than eat so much.


#13

I think I’ll be adopting part of this, instead of saying something negative, praying for the person first, or when a negative thought comes into the brain about someone, saying a prayer for them immediately. I think all this, though, goes hand-in-hand with my abstaining from politics, at least it does for me.:o


#14

I usually give up sodas (coke was the hardest to give up) and let me tell you, I lost 6 lbs from no sodas! This time I won’t give up anything since I’m pregnant and I’m already skipping sodas. I can’t stomach many things so if I give something up, I’ll be giving up nourishment for our baby.

Maybe I can give up something like internet or tv…


#15

i like this idea… instead of giving something up, add something into your life…
-say the rosary everyday and read a chapter of the bible.

-making the bed and keeping the whole house clean is another great idea!


#16

That is a really good idea, I’m definitely going to borrow that one from you!
I’m planning on putting my laptop in my brother’s vacant bedroom in the closet underneath clothes, and not taking it out until Easter Sunday. I end up grabbing it way to often to just look something up. But even if it’s only for 10 minutes, I know I could be doing something better with my time:) Like praying the Rosary, reading the Bible, or reading some JPII.

Let’s all pray for each other that through our sacrifices this Lent we may all come to a deeper understanding of the things that are of the greatest importance in life! Those prayers will do wonders!


#17

I’m going to do a couple of things for Lent. For starters, I’m going cold-turkey with facebook. It will be rough, I’m sure. My boyfriend is changing/not telling me my password to help me out. I spend at least an hour, probably closer to two or three or four on facebook a day. [Besides Facebook, I have to limit time spent on a computer each day]. Then, I’m beginning a thorough read of the Bible. I’m not sure how far I’ll get during Lent, but I’m going to start. Then, I’m going to try to give up pessimism and complaining. …I think I have two more things…I think I may be in over my head, but I’m going to try to stop biting my nails, also; and, I must try to begin praying again. For some reason prayer scares me. But, those are my five things for Lent. And, for some reason, I am very very very very impatient for Lent to get here.


#18

Tara, if you drink THAT much each and every day, I’d ease into the process slowly instead of going cold turkey. Baby steps are usually more successful. Certainly no point making it WAAAY more difficult for yourself (and God - and your family who are surely going to bear the brunt of your withdrawals!) than it’s going to be anyway.

Remember the saying ‘God helps those who help themselves’. So, have definite plans in place for yourself. Maybe drink only one litre a day for a week, then cut down to half a litre a day for another week, then one can or glass per day for a week after that, and then stop. But be a bit flexible - don’t beat yourself up for one bad day, instead resolve to stick to your set amount for the week and drink no more in total. That sort of thinking helps me a lot with my own struggles with overeating.

Find a replacement for your Pepsi. What other healthier but equally yummy drinks can you enjoy instead? Fresh fruit juices (with no added sugar)? Low-fat milk drinks? Tea or coffee? All in moderation of course.

Figure out rewards that you’re going to give yourself for each day that you stick to your plan - for example, save up the money you’d otherwise spend on Pepsi or whatnot, and at the end of the week spend it on a treat.

And make yourself accountable - tell your family, friends, workmates or whoever exactly what your plan is. Maybe make a deal with someone that you’ll pay THEM something every time you slip up and drink more than you should. Or some other penalty - something that’ll really hurt. Make the penalty worse the more you drink, so that even on those days that you have a little bit more you won’t be tempted to blow your resolution completely.


#19

Tara, if all that soda you drink has caffeine, be sure to replace the caffeine with tea or coffee so you don’t have unbearable withdrawal.

In general, I think it’s important to make the season of Lent really different from the rest of the year by stripping away things that distract from one’s relationship with God. It should be a less festive time, marked by some deprivation and more prayer and more good done for others.

For example, that means (for me) making Friday night less of a TGIF with pizza and beer and more of a simple supper and Stations of the Cross at church.

It means not scoffing at giving up things like sweets and soda and coffee. Last year I gave up sweets, and was a little embarrassed about it. Hey - I’m fifty-some years old and STILL giving up sweets?? Then I realized it was a subtle form of spiritual pride making me say that. Giving up sweets is a real sacrifice of a real and legitimate pleasure, of something that gives a festive air to the day. Unless you are “giving up” something you don’t really enjoy, this is a fine thing to do. It won’t do me much good to give up smoking or sushi, but my sweet goodies really are a sacrifice. Maybe someday I’ll grow up.

Other things I’ve given up - my favorite local talk radio program, meat, white flour, rolling my eyes and the critical spirit that goes with that, and wasting time, money & food. That last one was really tough. It’s so easy to just pick up dinner rather than cook, to spend hours online for no good reason, to buy myself a little something whenever I go to buy something necessary. That year, I had to buy a gift for someone, and found myself in the aisle in Target with the vases and such. I love flowers and vases, and I saw the most wonderful little vase that I wanted. It was only about $7, but I stayed strong and didn’t buy it. That little vase haunted me all of Lent, and the day after Easter, I went and bought it!

I like to have a special book to read for Lent, also. Last year it was *The Sacred Passion *by de la Palma. This year I’m thinking about What Jesus Saw From the Cross. Other good ones are *A Doctor At Calvary *and The Day Christ Died.

And I try to get serious about prayer and daily Mass and such. And more frequent confession. And deeper examination of conscience so important issues get taken care of in confession.

Hope you all have a profitable Lent!

Betsy


#20

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