Anybody know Latin?

i need an english phrase translated to Latin b/c i’m getting a tattoo of this phrase on my ankle
"He that plants thorns, must never expect roses"
Thanks to whomever can help!
~Megan

[quote=Megzy]i need an english phrase translated to Latin b/c i’m getting a tattoo of this phrase on my ankle
"He that plants thorns, must never expect roses"
Thanks to whomever can help!
~Megan
[/quote]

I am sure of the syntax but not of the vocabulary.

hamum qui adseret, debere numquam rosam sperat.

Megzy,

I heard Father Pacwa on EWTN the other day indicate that it is against church teaching to “deface” one’s body. That means no tatoos. I just wanted to let you know that. Does anyone else know this?

Newby

I understand that tattoos are not “officially” prohibited. But it seems that they do kinda mess you up. And they never go away. Why not just wait six months – or try out a fake tattoo for a year – and see if you still want this thing? Although customs change, at this point, women (and men, for that matter) with tattoos have a harder time in the professional world being perceived as mature and credible.

As a teenager, my 22-year-old daughter used to say that if you want to be trendy, getting something pierced is better than a tattoo because when you’re sick of it, you can take out the piercing jewelry and the hole disappears.

BTW: Jimmy’s noble effort is only slightly less “off” than Toula’s brothers’ in “My Big Fat Greek Wedding” telling Ian Miller that the Greek for “I have three testicles” means “Let’s all go into the house.” (Sorry, Jimmy – you did caution that the vocabulary might not be accurate.)

[quote=mercygate]BTW: Jimmy’s noble effort is only slightly less “off” than Toula’s brothers’ in “My Big Fat Greek Wedding” telling Ian Miller that the Greek for “I have three testicles” means “Let’s all go into the house.” (Sorry, Jimmy – you did caution that the vocabulary might not be accurate.)
[/quote]

No need to apologize.

But what is the correct interpretation. I would like to know.

Assuming the vocab is correct, I might translate it:

Hamos qui adseret, rosas numquam sperare debet.

Or

Spinas qui adseret, rosas numquam sperare debet.

Of course, it’s been years since I’ve tried to translate into latin, so I am open to criticism.

[quote=diarmait]Assuming the vocab is correct, I might translate it:

Hamos qui adseret, rosas numquam sperare debet.

Or

Spinas qui adseret, rosas numquam sperare debet.

Of course, it’s been years since I’ve tried to translate into latin, so I am open to criticism.
[/quote]

Your interpreting the thorn and the roses as the nominatives though. I would think they should be accusative. I used debere because in the infinative it is supposed to mean ought.

I thought hamos, spinas, and rosas were accusative plural.

I’ll take your word on debere.

[quote=diarmait]I thought hamos, spinas, and rosas were accusative plural.

I’ll take your word on debere.
[/quote]

They are, I am getting confused with Greek here. They are nominative forms in Greek.

You are corect, I am sorry.

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