Anyone repelled from vocation because of "formality"


#1

The title basically says it. Has anyone decided to not follow a vocation because they dislike the formality of it all. Such as saying the office, the whole initiation process into the order, etc?


#2

[quote="0129141, post:1, topic:253325"]
The title basically says it. Has anyone decided to not follow a vocation because they dislike the formality of it all. Such as saying the office, the whole initiation process into the order, etc?

[/quote]

I'm not sure how someone who dislikes praying the office, for example, could be said to have a vocation to something which requires the office. Nor a vocation to an order if they didn't want to go through the process required to enter that order.


#3

[quote="0129141, post:1, topic:253325"]
The title basically says it. Has anyone decided to not follow a vocation because they dislike the formality of it all. Such as saying the office, the whole initiation process into the order, etc?

[/quote]

Yes, it is a big obstacle those "dislikes"


#4

I know this happens all the time with the vocation of marriage. Some people don’t want to go through with it because of all the ceremony and expectations that go with it. That’s why they do it outside the church, or not at all.

For me, these formalities were never an obstacle with my vocation of marriage. They can be a bother, depending on the situation, but never and obstacle or “deal breaker”…not if you really want it or feel called to it.


#5

Being repelled by something doesn't necessarily change the fact that it is your vocation. Many people rebel against God from time to time, even those who become holy. St. Augustine spent many years wandering and running before he really became holy.

Look at your feelings of repulsion and look at them carefully. Where are they coming from? Is it personal vanity or convenience? Is it egoism? Or is it something else?

One might feel called to be in a monastery, but realize one is better suited as a missionary working out in the field, serving the poorest of the poor.

Discernment of vocation can be a major undertaking for some people.


#6

certainly no one with a genuine vocation has felt that way since the hallmark of a religious vocation is obedience, but I can see where that would give someone second thoughts if they were just exploring possibilities


#7

[quote="0129141, post:1, topic:253325"]
The title basically says it. Has anyone decided to not follow a vocation because they dislike the formality of it all. Such as saying the office, the whole initiation process into the order, etc?

[/quote]

I would go so far as to say that if you are not attracted to the "formalities" then you have no vocation. It would kinda be like saying, "I want to be an accountant but without a degree, without all that training, without the office time, without a company and without a boss". Hmmm.

That said, perhaps you have a vocation but with a community that has a particular prayer life and spirituality.


#8

Different vocations have different degrees of formality. Certain things are canonically required (vows, community life and prayer, some distinguishable religious identification [traditionally a habit but a community can adapt something less like a certain crucifix all member wear]) but beyond that it varies. My congregation, the Legionaries of Christ, is more formal that many others.

Initiation can vary a lot. Religious communities would have a novitiate (where learn to prayer and the spirituality of the community) and many dioceses are adapting a spiritual year with similar ends.

I would suggest investgating a few communities that interest you and see them from inside. You might fnd some of the formalities more naturally from the other side (i.e. living with the community).

I hope that helps.

In Christ,
br Matthew, LC


#9

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