Apolistic Sucession


#1

Why would the Lutherans not have it; it extra-ordinary circumstance the priest can ordain. A friend claims the need arose for this to happen, and so that is what happend.

How woudl you address this? thanks!


#2

Actually, if I’m not mistaken, the Lutheran Church in Sweden managed to somehow maintain a line of apostolic sucession. I could, however, be wrong.


#3

I guess you mean apostolic succession, that is succession from the apostles.

Holy Orders is a sacrament. Every sacrament has words and matter and must be accompanied with the intention of doing what Christ intended.

All Protestant movements began by denying this sacrament and therefore there passed at least a whole generation, where the sacrament was not administered or not validly administered. Once the chain is broken, there is no way to restore it unless you go to be ordained by a validly ordained bishop of another denomination.

Verbum


#4

Luther had to deny the sacrament fundamentally and therefore apostolic succession so that from this he built
his all other protests against the church.

[quote=alyssa]Why would the Lutherans not have it; it extra-ordinary circumstance the priest can ordain. A friend claims the need arose for this to happen, and so that is what happend.

How woudl you address this? thanks!
[/quote]


#5

I guess you mean apostolic succession, that is succession from the apostles.

Holy Orders is a sacrament. Every sacrament has words and matter and must be accompanied with the intention of doing what Christ intended.

All Protestant movements began by denying this sacrament and therefore there passed at least a whole generation, where the sacrament was not administered or not validly administered. Once the chain is broken, there is no way to restore it unless you go to be ordained by a validly ordained bishop of another denomination.

Verbum


#6

it exists in the anglican/episcopalian (episcopal=bishop)
henryIII broke off, but kept a very tight reign on his bishops and archbishops.


#7

[font=Verdana]While priests play an important role in the Catholic Church, it is Catholic Bishops who are the successors to the apostles. Here is an excerpt from one article which explains why Lutheran bishops do not have claim to “apostolic succession”:[/font]

The logic of the philosophy of the Protestant Faith is that all Church authority and teaching ended with the death of the Apostles. If you understand that Christ created a living Church for all time, the obvious is to acknowledge the succession to the Apostles to the current day. The Bishops of the Catholic Church can trace their ordination from today back to Peter, upon which Christ founded his Church. The following scripture passages point to clear evidence of Apostolic succession and the need for the Church as founded by Jesus to continue.

“Brothers, select from among you seven reputable men, filled with the Spirit and wisdom, whom we shall appoint to this task, whereas we shall devote ourselves to prayer and to the ministry of the word.” The proposal was acceptable to the whole community, so they chose Stephen, a man filled with faith and the holy Spirit, also Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Timon, Parmenas, and Nicholas of Antioch, a convert to Judaism. They presented these men to the apostles who prayed and laid hands on them." Acts 6:3-6

This scripture passage is an example of the expansion of the Church. It represents the ordination and continuation of the Faith. Much like today, hands are “laid upon” those being ordained. Many protestant religions have what is called “ordained” ministers. The question is ordained by whom. Since the Protestant Reformation was started by man, its authority is granted by man. The authority given by God to the Church is of God and cannot be claimed by any man. You cannot storm the gates of heaven, you must be called. Christ created one Church, one authority. Just because someone professes to be called by God does not make it the case. It may be wise to try and determine where those operating outside the one true Church gain their authority. God would not divide his kingdom. God would not divide his Church.

Source: ourcatholicfaith.org/whycatholic/apostolicsuccession.html


#8

[quote=alyssa]Why would the Lutherans not have it; it extra-ordinary circumstance the priest can ordain. A friend claims the need arose for this to happen, and so that is what happend.

How woudl you address this? thanks!
[/quote]

Only Bishops can ordain. Nowhere in history has a preist ordained bishops. Marty was the first to do that. Apostolic Succession is passed on through bishops, you can’t pass on what you don’t have. So, Marty passed on nothing, in the name of succession.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.