Apostles creed or Nicene Creed?

I’m looking for a little direction- I’m a cradle Catholic however, the formation I recieved was not the greatest. My father was a Catholic but my mother was not, so a lot of the faith I have learned on my own!! I taught my self to pray the Rosary after listening to my grandmother recite it before mass when we would visit, I have always said the Nicene Creed to begin it. Now as an adult with kids of my own, I’m trying to re-learn my faith CORRECTLY! All the literature, CD’s I have use the Apostles Creed when starting a Rosary, I’ve tried to switch it, but after years of saying the Nicene Creed, I always seem to end up saying that out of mere habit! Is this wrong? Which way do I teach my young children?

Thanks for any input, I truly do want to be accurate!:gopray2:

Since the Rosary is a private devotion, there really is no “right” way.

I use the Nicene creed, because that is what I am used to and what I have memorized.

You are perfectly fine saying the Nicene Creed. The Rosary is not regulated and there are many variations. It is a private devotion, not an official liturgical prayer.

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Just a suggestion, for starters:

youtube.com/watch?v=L9fzE8c5X7g&feature=fvwrel

:wink:

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I’ve never heard of a Rosary prayer using the Nicene Creed. I know the Rosary is a private devotion and you may do what you want but historically/traditionally The Apostles Creed has been used.

As noted by others, either is valid. However, I would be inclined to teach the children to use the Apostles Creed.

  1. It is easier to memorize I think.

  2. It will enable them to fit in better in group recitations.

Just my :twocents:; nothing vital.

Even though it’s a private devotion, there are some services where it is said as a congregation.

For example, I attend first Friday all night vigils and there are multiple parts of the vigil where the rosary is said using the different mysteries.

So I agree with whoever said I would teach them the Apostles Creed with the rosary, especially since it’s easier to remember, anyway.

I have a question though. Is there a specific translation that should be used? Should people start learning the new translation?

On a side note, when I learned the “Glory Be”, I learned “as it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be, world without end”. I have heard “as it was in the beginning, is now and will be forever, world without end.”

Is there an official translation of such things?

Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto, sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen. is the only official form of the prayer as far as I know. (It isn’t part of the OF, for one thing. Or did I miss it?)

Most literal English translation: “Glory to Father, and to Son, and to Holy Spirit, as it was in beginning, and now, and always, and in ages of ages.” (Where did the weird “world without end” come from anyway? It completely misses the mark, IMO.)

In Polish: Chwala Ojcu i Synowi i Duchowi Swietemu jak byla na poczatku, teraz i zawsze i na wieki wieków. Amen.

Other languages:

rosary-center.org/rosaryprayers.htm

Whichever way, it counts as prayer.

I like world without end, but that’s just me.

I scream for Nicene! It just spells out everything fantastically and outlines everything there is for the faith.

Either prayer is entirely appropriate. Use what you are comfortable with.

Oh boy! :rolleyes:

All I know if that when you got a site like Come pray the rosary, of if you way it with Mother Angelica, it is said a certain way.

Not to worry. It still counts as a prayer, whether it’s the Nicene Creed or Apostles’ Creed or Pastor Anglican’s way or Mother Angelica’s way. :D:D:D

By the way, I selected Spanish and I still got the English. :eek::eek:

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