Apostles spoke in Tongues after Pentecost


#1

Did All the Apostles continue to speak in tongues long after Pentecost? Their entire lives?

I have found several early church fathers who spoke in tongues but can’t seem to find anything on the Apostles after the year 51 Corinth.

Thanks John


#2

Paul said he thanked God that he spoke in tongues more than any one else he knew, and wrote about how to deal with people who gave prophecies in tongues, etc., so it was a charism in the early Church. I’m not sure when it became less important or not practiced in general any more. I do know that St. Francis of Assisi, St. Claire and several of their fellow Franciscans (in the 13th century, I believe) experienced a Pentecostal event during one of their meetings. The local people could hear them making sounds from inside of what looked like a burning building and ran to get water to put out the fire and rescue those they thought being burned alive. That’s how real a phenomena it was to them. But, that’s all I really know about the topic, no doubt others will give you more useful information.


#3

Generally once you are given the gift of tongues, you dont lose it… i say generally, because if you never use it agian, you will basically forget how, or lose any strength you had…that does not mean its not still there…


#4

Sorry for interrupting the thread. I didn’t want to begin a new one to pose this question. If I get answers, so be it.

What does it feel like to speak in tongues? Does it feel as though one is rambling? Does it feel as though one is communicating?
Are there any feelings/emotions that accomany it? Does it come on spontaneously or is it practiced and perfected? When one is speaking in tongues does one feel overtaken or in complete control?

In previous threads I see much debate about the authenticity of speaking in tongues. However I can’t find any references to the questions I asked here.


#5

correct me if I am wrong,

but I always thought that speaking in tongues meant you were able to speak in a language that you have never heard or learned wiht the intent to evangelize…

IE you go to kurplakistan to spread the word. You have never been there, or heard the kurplakistani language. Upon trying to share the words of Christ, you miracilously begin to speak their language…

I never understood where the idea of speaking in what sounds like mumbling or giborish (sp) is what it measn to speak in tongues…

Keep in mind, Paul said that there are two parts to speaking in tongues 1) you can speak the language 2) someone is there that can understand…

Anyway… Correct me if I am wrong, but that is my understanding both in how i have read scripture, as well as what the church teaches…

In Christ


#6

[quote=jjoshjl]correct me if I am wrong,

but I always thought that speaking in tongues meant you were able to speak in a language that you have never heard or learned wiht the intent to evangelize…

IE you go to kurplakistan to spread the word. You have never been there, or heard the kurplakistani language. Upon trying to share the words of Christ, you miracilously begin to speak their language…

I never understood where the idea of speaking in what sounds like mumbling or giborish (sp) is what it measn to speak in tongues…

Keep in mind, Paul said that there are two parts to speaking in tongues 1) you can speak the language 2) someone is there that can understand…

Anyway… Correct me if I am wrong, but that is my understanding both in how i have read scripture, as well as what the church teaches…

In Christ
[/quote]

yeah, i feel the same way… the ‘tongues’ the apostles spoke in
was the languages of the people around them…
:slight_smile:


#7

I don’t particulary like the word “tongues” because I came from a Charismatic sect of Protestantism that focused way too much on it. Tongues to me is way too KJV of a word, lol. The word means languages, so it should not be a bunch of babbling. Paul tells us the gift shouldn’t be used in a group of believers, but instead a group of unbelievers, why?

The reason why is that is is to be used to evangelize. I think it was Dr. Scott Hahn that I was listening to that talked about the widespread use of “tongues” wained after a few hundred years because we had “Christendom” then and pretty much all of the known world at the time had been evangelized.

Now, to present day. A little over 100 years ago, the Holy Spirit started pouring that same power back out again on Protestants and Catholics alike. Why?

The world had far and wide regressed from anything Christian and was becoming totally secular, therefore that same need of evangelization was here again. The problem I have experienced in the Protestant version of this gift is, it is almost never used to evangelize, it is used to pray over someone.

I am happy to see that Charismata has been accepted and embraced in the RCC. We should all seek our own Charism from the Holy Spirit. Paul tells us of several gifts in Corinthians that the Holy Spirit gives to us. I will not list them because I would rather you read it yourself in the Sacred Scripture.


#8

While tongues were a gift in the early Church, I am not sure that tongues were present at Pentecost.

Acts 2:8-11

Then how does each of us hear them in his own native language?9 We are Parthians, Medes, and Elamites, inhabitants of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia,10 Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the districts of Libya near Cyrene, as well as travelers from Rome,11 both Jews and converts to Judaism, Cretans and Arabs, yet we hear them speaking in our own tongues of the mighty acts of God."

If they were speaking all of these languages simultaneously it would have been a tremendous noise and confusion. I think it more likely that the apostles spoke in their own language and each **heard **in his own language.

:twocents:


#9

[quote=jjoshjl]correct me if I am wrong,

but I always thought that speaking in tongues meant you were able to speak in a language that you have never heard or learned wiht the intent to evangelize…

IE you go to kurplakistan to spread the word. You have never been there, or heard the kurplakistani language. Upon trying to share the words of Christ, you miracilously begin to speak their language…

I never understood where the idea of speaking in what sounds like mumbling or giborish (sp) is what it measn to speak in tongues…

** Keep in mind, Paul said that there are two parts to speaking in tongues 1) you can speak the language 2) someone is there that can understand…
**

Anyway… Correct me if I am wrong, but that is my understanding both in how i have read scripture, as well as what the church teaches…

In Christ
[/quote]

bingo… (catholic langue for you hit the nail on the head)


#10

[quote=Mijoy2]Sorry for interrupting the thread. I didn’t want to begin a new one to pose this question. If I get answers, so be it.

What does it feel like to speak in tongues? Does it feel as though one is rambling? Does it feel as though one is communicating?
Are there any feelings/emotions that accomany it? Does it come on spontaneously or is it practiced and perfected? When one is speaking in tongues does one feel overtaken or in complete control?

In previous threads I see much debate about the authenticity of speaking in tongues. However I can’t find any references to the questions I asked here.
[/quote]

I speak for only me: There is no loss of control. I feel at peace. I just ask the Holy Spirit to pray with me, and through me. It is spontaneous, but not uncontrolled. It is quiet some times hardly audible.

Do you ever get a tug to pray but can’t figure out what you are supposed to be praying for?


#11

[quote=jjoshjl]correct me if I am wrong,

but I always thought that speaking in tongues meant you were able to speak in a language that you have never heard or learned wiht the intent to evangelize…

IE you go to kurplakistan to spread the word. You have never been there, or heard the kurplakistani language. Upon trying to share the words of Christ, you miracilously begin to speak their language…

I never understood where the idea of speaking in what sounds like mumbling or giborish (sp) is what it measn to speak in tongues…

Keep in mind, Paul said that there are two parts to speaking in tongues 1) you can speak the language 2) someone is there that can understand…

Anyway… Correct me if I am wrong, but that is my understanding both in how i have read scripture, as well as what the church teaches…

In Christ
[/quote]

You are partially correct. here are 3 New Testament descriptions of glossia.

  1. People heard one language yet understood it in their own:

Acts 2:6-11 At this sound, they gathered in a large crowd, but they were confused because each one heard them speaking in his own language. They were astounded, and in amazement they asked, “**Are not all these people who are speaking Galileans? Then how does each of us hear them in his own native language? ** We are Parthians, Medes, and Elamites, inhabitants of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia, Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the districts of Libya near Cyrene, as well as travelers from Rome, both Jews and converts to Judaism, Cretans and Arabs, yet we hear them speaking in our own tongues of the mighty acts of God.”

  1. People spoke in a language that was able to be translated.

1 Cor. 12 and 14 bear this out, and I see you are familiar with these passages.

  1. A language known only to God, also called a prayer language.

1 Cor 14:2 For one who speaks in a tongue does not speak to human beings but to God, for no one listens; he utters mysteries in spirit.

Do not be afraid of people that pray in tongues and let us all hear St. Paul’s admonition:

1 Cor 14:39,40 So, (my) brothers, strive eagerly to prophesy, and do not forbid speaking in tongues, but everything must be done properly and in order.


#12

[quote=b_justb]I speak for only me: There is no loss of control. I feel at peace. I just ask the Holy Spirit to pray with me, and through me. It is spontaneous, but not uncontrolled. It is quiet some times hardly audible.

Do you ever get a tug to pray but can’t figure out what you are supposed to be praying for?
[/quote]

How do you know that it is the Holy Spirit speaking through you?


#13

Let me point out that we’re talking about different phenomena here – the Apostles spoke to a polyglot audience who each understood them to be speaking in his native language.

When Paul discusses talking in tongues, he makes it clear that his audience does not understand him, and someone else must translate.


#14

[quote=b_justb]I speak for only me: There is no loss of control. I feel at peace. I just ask the Holy Spirit to pray with me, and through me. It is spontaneous, but not uncontrolled. It is quiet some times hardly audible.

Do you ever get a tug to pray but can’t figure out what you are supposed to be praying for?
[/quote]

Oh Yes I do. But being a reserved person I can’t see myself ever doing something as seemingly out of character as speaking in tongues unless I was completely overtaken. It’s something I have great difficulty understanding. I’d like to know more about it. Not that I chose to be, but I am a skeptic by nature. Not only of tongues but of most everything.

My only experience in speaking in tounges is hearing an audio tape of Kenneth Copland (excuse spelling). To be perfectly honest it seemed not only staged but totally foolish and so ridiculous as to be insulting. He was communicating with someone else (anoth pastor I believe) in laughter. You could sense thier efforts to maintain it.

I’m not sure all speaking in toungues is this way. It’s just my only experience hearing it.


#15

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