Appropriate Punishment: Please read before voting.


#1

OK, we have a few debates going on the viability of the death penalty. I would like to know what punishment people think is appropriate for this crime…we’ll use something recent. Assume that the criminal is actually guilty of the crime (100% GUILTY).

A 9 year old girl is abducted from her bed in the middle of the night, raped, and then murdered. The person who comitted this crime is found to be a repeat sexual offender/child molester. He has confessed this crime to the authorities.

What is the proper punishment?

Please post any arguments in favor of your choice.

Thank you.


#2

Personally I think it would be appropriate to lock this monster away for the rest of his life, and I mean never, ever being eligible for parole (thus the problem with our prison system). He should stay in jail until the day he dies. But, some would see that as a more cruel and unusual punishment than the death penalty. In these cases, two wrongs don’t make a right; killing this man in no way atones for what he did.


#3

[quote=vegpotter]Personally I think it would be appropriate to lock this monster away for the rest of his life, and I mean never, ever being eligible for parole (thus the problem with our prison system). He should stay in jail until the day he dies. But, some would see that as a more cruel and unusual punishment than the death penalty. In these cases, two wrongs don’t make a right; killing this man in no way atones for what he did.
[/quote]

If you’re still following this, please vote in the poll…I hadn’t finished it when you posted. Thanx!


#4

The real problem is that this is a sex offender and they are simply impossible to rehabilitate in any significant percentage. While I voted rot in prison until you die, the reality is, turning them loose in the prison population would probably shorten their life considerably.

Lisa N


#5

Personally, I would prefer having 10 mins alone (please ignore the screaming) followed by life in prison, no parole. But not my will be done, but the Lords, so I just chose life in prison, no parole.

Personally, I think that a solitary confinement of sorts should be placed on these sick people. No outside information or speaking with others, except a lawyer/priest. I’m guessing that a lot of these people would prefer death to this. It would give them time to come to terms with God, they would realize they are being punished. There would be no books written, no letters to fans/other deranged people. No way for them to influence the outside world; as thier psycological influence can be damaging also.


#6

While I’m very tempted to have 10 minutes alone in a dark, sound-proof place, I know that isn’t a holy thought worthy of a Christian.

Life in prison, NO parole, and in extreme lockdown and solitary. I’m talking solitary to the point of near sensory-depravation. No talking to others, minimal “recreation” time during the day (still isolated with snipers up in a tower watching their every move in a lock-down yard). I would also ideally have a special order of religious dedicated to praying for the souls of those who are locked up like this; someone needs to pray for them.

Honestly, I’d prefer death to this kind of lock-up, so I think it would be a perfectly suitable punishment.


#7

Oooops, I voted in the wrong category. I meant to put the solitary/rot option. There IS actually a lock-down like this in one U.S. prison in California, and it’s experimental, so I put the “U.S. prison” option not realizing that the Poll was using that to refer to typical life-imprisonment style in the U.S.


#8

Someone that sick needs to be in jail for the rest of there life in my book.


#9

[quote=Ghosty]Oooops, I voted in the wrong category. I meant to put the solitary/rot option. There IS actually a lock-down like this in one U.S. prison in California, and it’s experimental, so I put the “U.S. prison” option not realizing that the Poll was using that to refer to typical life-imprisonment style in the U.S.
[/quote]

Sheesh, I just realized I did the same thing… Great minds think alike! :stuck_out_tongue:


#10

Life in prison, no parole, so he would have to live with himself and what he did for the remainder of his life…lethal injection or the electric chair are too charitable…


#11

Something about child abduction, child rape, and child murder is beyond the pale for me. With a heavy heart, I vote for the death penalty, given DNA evidence is on record, with no appeals available.


#12

[quote=jlw]Something about child abduction, child rape, and child murder is beyond the pale for me. With a heavy heart, I vote for the death penalty, given DNA evidence is on record, with no appeals available.
[/quote]

I agree completely…I can accept a crime against an adult, but not against children. I know it may not be logical, but child molestors make me hateful. I want to hurt them as badly as they hurt the children…and then hurt them some more for good measure. :mad:

I know that this is about the worst thing that people can imagine, thats why I used it as the crime for the poll…

Oh, for the record, I voted for the 5 minutes alone…I would be doing penance for years afterwards I’m sure…


#13

Something about child abduction, child rape, and child murder is beyond the pale for me. With a heavy heart, I vote for the death penalty, given DNA evidence is on record, with no appeals available.

Then all you have to do is put him into the general “life in prison” population. No need for a forced death penalty.

There’s a reason people like that get put in special areas and are given 24-hour personal guards.


#14

wow. everyone who’s posted so far (that i read - sorry if i missed you) seems convinced that a person who did this sort of thing is a ‘horrible monster’ utterly disconnected from our own propensity for sin.

what you’ve described is a horrible act.

but are we saying that we are not capable of it? that we’re ‘good people’ and this is a ‘bad person’?

do we not consider that ‘but for the grace of God, there go i’?

we are all sinful people. all of us, if put in the wrong situation, with the wrong upbringing, and the wrong ‘understanding’ of the world, could be capable of atrocities worse than this. no?

this, my friends, is why our vote should be for life imprisonment, with heavy emphasis on rehabilitation. because if it were me, that’s what i’d want. this is a person, who can spend his eternity in heaven or hell, based on whether we kill him now, or give him time to learn about what he did, and what it means, and why it’s wrong, and what to do about it.

our outrage at his act makes us want ‘five minutes alone’. but this outrage is not toward the person - it’s toward the action. the person needs our love - just as we need God’s.


#15

I do not believe in the death penalty. I used to but after a serious conversation with a bishop about Catholic position and considering my strong opinions against abortion, I changed.

I am all for forgiveness and work toward helping the man/woman repent and convert. Never-the-less, the person pay for the crime, regardless of circumstances. Further, society must be protected from such people.

Bob


#16

[quote=jeffreedy789]wow. everyone who’s posted so far (that i read - sorry if i missed you) seems convinced that a person who did this sort of thing is a ‘horrible monster’ utterly disconnected from our own propensity for sin.

what you’ve described is a horrible act.

but are we saying that we are not capable of it? that we’re ‘good people’ and this is a ‘bad person’?

do we not consider that ‘but for the grace of God, there go i’?

we are all sinful people. all of us, if put in the wrong situation, with the wrong upbringing, and the wrong ‘understanding’ of the world, could be capable of atrocities worse than this. no?

this, my friends, is why our vote should be for life imprisonment, with heavy emphasis on rehabilitation. because if it were me, that’s what i’d want. this is a person, who can spend his eternity in heaven or hell, based on whether we kill him now, or give him time to learn about what he did, and what it means, and why it’s wrong, and what to do about it.

our outrage at his act makes us want ‘five minutes alone’. but this outrage is not toward the person - it’s toward the action. the person needs our love - just as we need God’s.
[/quote]

Do you mean to say that there is no culpability for sin? That we have no choice when we sin. Sin is, by definition, a choice. Isn’t the person who would commit such horrible acts a monster? If not, what does it take to become a monster? 10 children? 50 children? 100? One long-term study of hundreds of sex offenders found that the pedophile child molester committed an average of 281 acts with 150 partners. The most conservative study I have ever seen said that the average child molester has molested 18 children before they are caught the first time. Most are repeat offenders…

Now, I know that most child molesters don’t murder their victims, but the rape is (In my opinon) the worst part of the crime…the murder is horrible, but the rape is a violation.


#17

I had trouble deciding between the death penalty and rot in prison option. I choose the death penalty because we as humans should not make life a living hell for people, God will do that, and it will be worse than anything a human can do to somone. So I say let him “meet his maker”.


#18

Do you mean to say that there is no culpability for sin? That we have no choice when we sin. Isn’t the person who would commit such horrible acts a monster? If not, what does it take to become a monster? 10 children? 50 children? 100?

um, no. i don’t see how you get ‘no culpability for sin’ from what i posted. can you help me understand that bit? we ARE culpable for our sins - which is EXACTLY why we don’t want to send this man to hell.

no number of ‘acts’ would make this man a monster. thank goodness. he is forgiven 70 times 7 times, just as we are.

this man will never be a monster - he will always be a human being, capable of being forgiven and redeemed, just as i am.

Sin is, by definition, a choice.

um, no. sin is not a choice, by definition. if it were, then there would be no such thing as venial sins.


#19

Re-establish institutions for the criminally insane and sexually deviant. Of course, the ACLU will object. A big part of the problem is that persons like this are thrown out on the streets due to budget cuts.

Our prison system needs intense reform. Due to all the efforts of “civil libertarians,” lawyers and liberal activist judges, our prisons are festering with drug abuse, weapons, and prostitution rings. Bring back hard, forced labor camps…balls and chains and breaking rocks while the sun mercilessly beats down. Forget the TV’s, computers, university degrees, etc.

The abuse that prisoners enact upon other prisoners, and that some corrections officers engage in a la Abu Ghraib fashion, needs also to be stopped.


#20

Bring back hard, forced labor camps…balls and chains and breaking rocks while the sun mercilessly beats down. Forget the TV’s, computers, university degrees, etc.

believe it or not (i say that because of my previous posts in this thread) i agree with you.

because there is value in suffering. if this man who raped this girl and then killed her, spends the rest of his days breaking rocks, maybe God will have the opportunity of breaking his rock - his heart.


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