Are adults living with their parents obliged to obey them?


#1

Is someone who has reached the age of majority (18 in most jurisdictions) but who still lives with his parents under a moral obligation to obey their commands?

The Old Catholic Encyclopedia would seem to think not:

Children are released from parental control when they attain their majority, or are legally emancipated.

John Paul II's Catechism appears to contradict this:

As long as a child lives at home with his parents, the child should obey his parents in all that they ask of him when it is for his good or that of the family.

but this statement is ambiguous: does "child" refer to offspring in general or just to minors, and what is the significance of the last eleven words?

If anyone can offer clarity, I would appreciate it. However, given that I will be busy during this week, and will not have time for lengthy discussion, I ask that only those who can cite a reliable authority (such as a priest or moral theologian) reply, and that those who cannot cite one refrain from offering their own personal opinions or musings.


#2

If you look at the whole quote from the Catechism I believe the answer is there, my emphasis

2217 As long as a child lives at home with his parents, the child should obey his parents in all that they ask of him when it is for his good or that of the family. "Children, obey your parents in everything, for this pleases the Lord."Children should also obey the reasonable directions of their teachers and all to whom their parents have entrusted them. But if a child is convinced in conscience that it would be morally wrong to obey a particular order, he must not do so.
As they grow up, children should continue to respect their parents. They should anticipate their wishes, willingly seek their advice, and accept their just admonitions. Obedience toward parents ceases with the emancipation of the children; not so respect, which is always owed to them. This respect has its roots in the fear of God, one of the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

So while 18 (in most cases) means you are an adult, if your parents are still contributing to your support, and you would not be able to support yourself without them, it would seem to me that you owe them obedience.

[quote="Soler, post:1, topic:314418"]
Is someone who has reached the age of majority (18 in most jurisdictions) but who still lives with his parents under a moral obligation to obey their commands?

The Old Catholic Encyclopedia would seem to think not: John Paul II's Catechism appears to contradict this: but this statement is ambiguous: does "child" refer to offspring in general or just to minors, and what is the significance of the last eleven words?

If anyone can offer clarity, I would appreciate it. However, given that I will be busy during this week, and will not have time for lengthy discussion, I ask that only those who can cite a reliable authority (such as a priest or moral theologian) reply, and that those who cannot cite one refrain from offering their own personal opinions or musings.

[/quote]


#3

I would definitely think so. If the adult child(ren) cannot abide by the rules of their parents' home, that would be some pretty good motivation for them to seek out their own place and then live by their own rules. I have family members who are adults and still live at home, but think that once they turned 18, they can do and say as they please without any respect to the fact that they are STILL living under someone else's roof!


#4

[quote="Soler, post:1, topic:314418"]
Is someone who has reached the age of majority (18 in most jurisdictions) but who still lives with his parents under a moral obligation to obey their commands?

The Old Catholic Encyclopedia would seem to think not: John Paul II's Catechism appears to contradict this: but this statement is ambiguous: does "child" refer to offspring in general or just to minors, and what is the significance of the last eleven words?

If anyone can offer clarity, I would appreciate it. However, given that I will be busy during this week, and will not have time for lengthy discussion, I ask that only those who can cite a reliable authority (such as a priest or moral theologian) reply, and that those who cannot cite one refrain from offering their own personal opinions or musings.

[/quote]

No matter what the age, if you are living at home you are required to obey your parents. If that becomes urksome for some reason and you can support yourself, you should move out and start your own life. However, if you must live at home, perhaps you can discuss disagreements calmly with your parents about certain issues. Linus


#5

I would think so. I'm in this very situation myself. They're helping to support me, so the very least I owe them would be obedience.

I hope that didn't come out wrong.:blush:


#6

Yes, As long as you are living in my house you must obey my rules. If you chose to do otherwise: then get your own place.


#7

[quote="Seeking_Him, post:5, topic:314418"]
I would think so. I'm in this very situation myself. They're helping to support me, so the very least I owe them would be obedience.

[/quote]

Good for you! :thumbsup:


#8

[quote="Soler, post:1, topic:314418"]
Is someone who has reached the age of majority (18 in most jurisdictions) but who still lives with his parents under a moral obligation to obey their commands?

The Old Catholic Encyclopedia would seem to think not: John Paul II's Catechism appears to contradict this: but this statement is ambiguous: does "child" refer to offspring in general or just to minors, and what is the significance of the last eleven words?

If anyone can offer clarity, I would appreciate it. However, given that I will be busy during this week, and will not have time for lengthy discussion, I ask that only those who can cite a reliable authority (such as a priest or moral theologian) reply, and that those who cannot cite one refrain from offering their own personal opinions or musings.

[/quote]

Ten Commandments," Honor your Father and your Mother"


#9

[quote="flower_lady, post:6, topic:314418"]
Yes, As long as you are living in my house you must obey my rules. If you chose to do otherwise: then get your own place.

[/quote]

You assume that if you are living with your parents, that the house belongs to them.

What if it your house? Or a rented house, and you share the rent?


closed #10

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