Are Catholics allowed to pray with Mormons?

If a Mormons is leading a Christian prayer with Christians from different denominations as a Catholic in my allowed to say amen. I’m asking because Mormons have such a distorted view of Christianity that the church doesn’t even recognize their baptism. I’m wondering if I should pray with them or not.

Yes, if you agree with the prayer’s positive intentions itself then you should. God listens to all Prayers to him.

It’s the same as if you choose to pray with an Islamic, a Jewish person or a Protestant.

But I would say, the best thing to do with Mormons is to confidenty lead the prayer yourself. Because they will ALWAYS say “Heavenly Father”(due to their belief that God has a humanly form, which is the heresy of believing God isn’t Omni-present and Omni-potent), they hardly ever say “Father God” or “Our Father”(they don’t like this either, most likely because of the common line that follows “who art in heaven”, their interpretation of “Heaven” is in fact Space)…

I’ve seen “Heavenly Father” used in other Christian prayer, even at Mass.

Of cause it is…

What I was trying to say is that if you look at, or listen to most Mormon prayers, they will ONLY use this, and do not often(NEVER! I have never heard a Mormon use any other opening line to a prayer) use other terms referring to God, especially when praying. This is due to their belief that God the father has a form, and is not Omni-potent or Omni-Present.

This is their own website’s guide to prayers:
lds.org/manual/gospel-principles/chapter-8-praying-to-our-heavenly-father

Notice how they refer to “Heavenly Father” even when God, more grammatically correct, is what a Catholic or Protestant would normally say.

Some examples:
“In what ways has Heavenly Father answered your prayers?”
“As we pray to our Heavenly Father, we should tell Him what we really feel in our hearts”
“We need to pray to ask our Heavenly Father for strength to live the gospel.”
"Prayer is a sincere, heartfelt talk with our Heavenly Father. "

And I am telling you from experience with Mormons, if allowed to lead the prayers, they will ALWAYS begin with “Heavenly Father” and will react to you when you insist on using one of the other traditional opening Prayer statements referring to God. Including the opening line of the Our Father prayer.

The Our Father prayer is interpreted in Mormonism as a “Template prayer”, and is actually rarely spoken word for word in a Mormon church.

Pray with Mormons, by all means. They are nice, quite loving people. But be aware that this is indeed one of their quirks caused by their belief about God’s nature, and that you should lead the prayer if you can(Don’t be rude about it though). Lead them in the Our Father if they let you!

Generally we do use the term Heavenly Father. However, I have heard LDS people use Our Father who art in Heaven. In fact I see little difference between the two terms they are essentially synonymous. I think the usage of the term “Heavenly Father” has to do more with culture.

We do believe that God the Father has form but we also believe he is omnipotent and omnipresent. Now let me explain this. He is a glorified being, a person. He of course cannot be in billions of places simultaneously. However, through the Spirit he is omnipresent. This Spirit is not him. It is the means, substance, or power he uses to be in constant communication with all his creations. By this same Spirit he knows all things.

[quote=colliric]This is their own website’s guide to prayers:
lds.org/manual/gospel-principles/chapter-8-praying-to-our-heavenly-father

Notice how they refer to “Heavenly Father” even when God, more grammatically correct, is what a Catholic or Protestant would normally say.

Some examples:
“In what ways has Heavenly Father answered your prayers?”
“As we pray to our Heavenly Father, we should tell Him what we really feel in our hearts”
“We need to pray to ask our Heavenly Father for strength to live the gospel.”
"Prayer is a sincere, heartfelt talk with our Heavenly Father. "

And I am telling you from experience with Mormons, if allowed to lead the prayers, they will ALWAYS begin with “Heavenly Father” and will react to you when you insist on using one of the other traditional opening Prayer statements referring to God. Including the opening line of the Our Father prayer.

The Our Father prayer is interpreted in Mormonism as a “Template prayer”, and is actually rarely spoken word for word in a Mormon church.

Pray with Mormons, by all means. They are nice, quite loving people. But be aware that this is indeed one of their quirks caused by their belief about God’s nature, and that you should lead the prayer if you can(Don’t be rude about it though). Lead them in the Our Father if they let you!
[/quote]

You are correct about the “Our Father” prayer. In our prayers we do not repeat word for word a previously spoken prayer. We feel that a rote prayer has a high likelihood of being impersonal. It also tends to not give God thanks for our personal blessings or ask him for what we need at the moment.

This is an oxymoron.

As others have pointed out, this is a contradiction. Omnipresent means he IS in “billions of places simultaneously”

You are correct about the “Our Father” prayer. In our prayers we do not repeat word for word a previously spoken prayer. We feel that a rote prayer has a high likelihood of being impersonal. It also tends to not give God thanks for our personal blessings or ask him for what we need at the moment.

And I can understand that logic. It just seems strange that you take it to the extreme of not even using a prayer Jesus taught us.

No this is just simple truth. Spirit permeates the universe, but God is not this Spirit. A very crude comparison might be electro-magnetic waves which cannot be seen but are none the less present. By transmitting and receiving these waves one can communicate and be in contact with others. The Spirit acts in some similar fashion. God our Father uses the Spirit to be in contact with all his creations.

This should not be confused with the Holy Ghost who is a separate personage and also uses the Spirit.

Please. LDS prayers may not be written down, but they can be highly repetitious, using the same words and phrases in almost every prayer. They may as well be written down and read. LDS prayer can be just as impersonal and vain as any prayer that is read. What matters is in the heart. I love the prayers that have been written down. They are very beautiful and poetic. Frankly the authors of those prayers have a better way of saying things that are in my heart than I do sometimes. So why not use those prayers if they really do come from my heart?

Prayers in LDS services and in the temple are highly repetitive even though they are not written down. It does not make them superior to prayers that are written down and read. It just makes them as “vain and repetitious” as “rote” prayers.

Back to answer the OP’s question before the thread derails, as most of the Mormon threads do.

Yes, you can pray with Mormons.

Certainly, individual members may give prayers that are repetitive and impersonal. My point is simply that prayers written by others have a high potential to be less personal. Perhaps you disagree with this statement. But in my opinion this is why the LDS church and it’s members avoid them.

But the sacrament prayer is completely repetitive and if not done exactly right must be repeated until it is absolutely perfectly done before sacrament can proceed.

Just to clarify it’s a nondenominational prayer so it’s not like the Mormon prayers with all the repetitive stuff. I just wanted to make sure because I’ve been reading about the rituals in the Mormon Temple and the baptism for the dead and frankly it scared me. I wanted to make sure that I wasn’t acknowledging the Mormon Jesus by saying amen. Because when I pray to Jesus I’m praying to the real Jesus. Thank you for your responses everyone.

I think that both ways have a high potential to be less personal. With prayers that have already been written, one should think about the words, why they are saying them, what they mean, and their personal connection to them as a reason for why they are saying that prayer. This is no different than reciting the Sacrament blessing prayer, or the words of various other ordinances (i.e. parts of the Endowment and the Initiatory). Catholics are okay with saying “set” prayers, as well as spontaneous ones. The issue is simply to not make it “vain repetitions”.

Although many LDS prayers are not of the “set” variety, i.e. written in stone like the Hail Mary or Our Father (Lord’s Prayer), they end up being similar anyway, as I’m sure anyone that has attended Sacrament Meetings anywhere for an extended period would attest-“Dear Heavenly Father, we’re thankful for this beautiful Sabbath day…please bless that we can all return safely home and feel the Spirit as we continue/go about our day…we pray for those unable to make it to Sacrament Meeting…we pray that thy Spirit may bless the speakers today…we’re grateful for the Atonement…etc”, and of course “Dear Heavenly Father, please bless this food that it will be nourishing and strengthen our bodies”, and other prayers that I’m sure weren’t just said in my ward.

All my family are LDS. I am respectful during their prayers, but cannot in good conscience say “amen”, and never do.

Then logically, you must feel the whole Bible has a high likelihood of being impersonal.

Then what about the prayers at the one-and-only sacrament Mormons have? It is always identical, exactly.

I may be wrong, but I believe that other Mormon prayers are by rote. Baptism, confirmation, ordination.

Exactly and another example of Mormon scripted prayers. Every word said in the temple is by rote. When you go for your endowment they follow a script exactly.

Not sure what you mean by this. A book is someone else’s experience. A prayer is my personal experience with God. Yes, by it’s very nature a book is less personal.

All written prayers in the LDS church of which I am aware, are ordinances not personal communication with God. Through ordinances our Father in Heaven communicates promises to his children. I see a need for these promises to be crystal clear. It is for this reason that they are said verbatim.

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