Are Christian Prayer shawls aloud and can they be used during Mass and prayer time?


#1

This prayer shawl here.

It looks like a stole, and I don’t want anyone to be confused; but, can I buy them and use them as a prayer tool and also during Mass if I pleased?

It’s sold by a Christian website, but I’m not sure which denominations, probably Protestant.

So is it allowed?


#2

[quote="JD27076, post:1, topic:293480"]
This prayer shawl here.

It looks like a stole, and I don't want anyone to be confused; but, can I buy them and use them as a prayer tool and also during Mass if I pleased?

It's sold by a Christian website, but I'm not sure which denominations, probably Protestant.

So is it allowed?

[/quote]

We use those in our church. We have one on the platform and sometimes when someone is praying at the altar the pastor will be led to place it on the praying person. It was manufactured in Israel and has been anointed with olive oil from the Holy Land. (We're Pentecostal by the way. I'm not sure if other churches use them though).


#3

[quote="JD27076, post:1, topic:293480"]
This prayer shawl here.

It looks like a stole, and I don't want anyone to be confused; but, can I buy them and use them as a prayer tool and also during Mass if I pleased?

It's sold by a Christian website, but I'm not sure which denominations, probably Protestant.

So is it allowed?

[/quote]

You can wear whatever you like for your personal prayer, as long as it is in keeping with the sentiment of prayer and not attempting to mimic one of the sacred vestments, which have their own meaning and function.

For Mass, it differs. If the shawl is like a tallit, it is probably broad enough not to be confused with a stole, and will just look like a shawl. In that case, I don't see why not, though you might want to take into account the impressions of the priest and other people in the church, whether they would be distracted or confused, and things like that

If it is too narrow and looks like a stole, I would avoid wearing it - definitely for Mass, and also during prayer with other people where it may be confused with the vestment.


#4

[quote="JD27076, post:1, topic:293480"]
This prayer shawl here.

It looks like a stole, and I don't want anyone to be confused; but, can I buy them and use them as a prayer tool and also during Mass if I pleased?

It's sold by a Christian website, but I'm not sure which denominations, probably Protestant.

So is it allowed?

[/quote]

Absolutely not. Ever.

Frankly, I'm curious: how, exactly, would this be a "prayer tool"? It sounds more like a desire to draw attention to yourself.


#5

[quote="JD27076, post:1, topic:293480"]
This prayer shawl here.

It looks like a stole, and I don't want anyone to be confused; but, can I buy them and use them as a prayer tool and also during Mass if I pleased?

It's sold by a Christian website, but I'm not sure which denominations, probably Protestant.

So is it allowed?

[/quote]

Never use one of those. Those are cherished by the Jews and their use by non-Jews is deeply offensive to them. We should not use them for the same reason we would not want their rabbis to wear a stole and chasuble.


#6

Our parish knits them...so they are not confused with a priests vestments...and has them blessed and gives them to people who need them. I love mine...it's very comforting to pray with it on....


#7

[quote="joe_cool, post:4, topic:293480"]
Absolutely not. Ever.

[/quote]

Why not?


#8

You can find patterns on Ebay for making them, knitting, crochet and quilting or just sewing one. They have them for different reasons, some can be made for people who are sick or who have friends and loved ones who are sick, for the loss of a friend or family member, etc.

Check them out, they are not something that would be confused with a stole.


#9

These have nothing to do with prayer as you mean it. Started by some wonderful Baptist ladies, the movement has been taken up by prayerful people of any and all denominations. Knitted or crocheted shawls or lap blankets are prayed over as they are being hand made, that God will see fit to use them as a means of consolation, peace and comfort...and these are presented with that known as the intent, to the grieving, the worried, the lonely, those sick or dying. They have proven to be a wonderful extension of living our Christianity.
Jerry Stephens


#10

[quote="Jerry_Stephens, post:9, topic:293480"]
These have nothing to do with prayer as you mean it. Started by some wonderful Baptist ladies, the movement has been taken up by prayerful people of any and all denominations. Knitted or crocheted shawls or lap blankets are prayed over as they are being hand made, that God will see fit to use them as a means of consolation, peace and comfort...and these are presented with that known as the intent, to the grieving, the worried, the lonely, those sick or dying. They have proven to be a wonderful extension of living our Christianity.
Jerry Stephens

[/quote]

What you are describing doesn't seem very similar to what the OP is asking about. It appears to be a manufactured tallis with the Lord's prayer on one side and something in Hebrew on the other. I would be concerned about it being offensive to the Jewish faith as well. I would not recommend wearing it to Mass unless it is under the clothing. The shawls and blankets that the faithful knit and crochet and pray over for the sick and elderly are another matter.


#11

[quote="JD27076, post:1, topic:293480"]
This prayer shawl here.

It looks like a stole, and I don't want anyone to be confused; but, can I buy them and use them as a prayer tool and also during Mass if I pleased?

It's sold by a Christian website, but I'm not sure which denominations, probably Protestant.

So is it allowed?

[/quote]

In what way is this a "prayer tool?" How does a drape like the one pictured in the link with Hebrew inscriptions assist in Christian prayer - and at Mass especially?


#12

The answer can be found in why God commanded the Children of Israel to make such garments - Numbers 15:39 “that you may see it and remember all the commandments of Hashem and perform them” - this is more than a little incongruous in a Christian framework. The addition of part of the Christian “Lord’s prayer” in Hebrew and English only adds to the effect. The irony, is that those Christians who wish to wear a replica of a Jewish Tallit, are no doubt those Christians who have the greatest affinity to Jews and respect toward Judaism.


#13

[quote="ltwin, post:2, topic:293480"]
We use those in our church. We have one on the platform and sometimes when someone is praying at the altar the pastor will be led to place it on the praying person.

[/quote]

I would be really uncomfortable with someone doing that to me.


#14

[quote="chosen_people, post:12, topic:293480"]
The answer can be found in why God commanded the Children of Israel to make such garments - Numbers 15:39 "that you may see it and remember all the commandments of Hashem and perform them" - this is more than a little incongruous in a Christian framework. The addition of part of the Christian "Lord's prayer" in Hebrew and English only adds to the effect. The irony, is that those Christians who wish to wear a replica of a Jewish Tallit, are no doubt those Christians who have the greatest affinity to Jews and respect toward Judaism.

[/quote]

So you don't consider its use by non-Jews offensive?


#15

[quote="porthos11, post:14, topic:293480"]
So you don't consider its use by non-Jews offensive?

[/quote]

On a personal level I understand that no offense is intended and it may be seen as a Christian wishing to identify with what he feels are his "Jewish roots". However, if someone were to stroll through an Ultra-Orthodox Jewish neighborhood wearing this object, I think the word "offensive" would probably not begin to describe the reaction.


#16

I found this online, the church is Lutheran.

Why would a Christian use a prayer shawl?

The modern Christian is under no commandment requiring the use of prayer shawls. However, many find the use of a prayer shawl helpful or comforting for some of the same reasons it is used in other traditions. Prayer shawls create an intentionally altered experience of the physical space and sensation of prayer. By changing the common, everyday sensations with which we are surrounded, the prayer shawl assists the person praying to focus on God. Additionally, some find that wearing the prayer shawl encourages the turning inward that is one of the necessary components of prayer, by providing the symbolic “cover” of prayer so often mentioned in the Psalms.

How does one use a prayer shawl?

There is no right way or wrong way to use a prayer shawl within the Christian tradition. Some people will choose to wear them around their shoulders. Some will choose to wear them draped over their head. Some may simply lay the shawl across their lap while praying. In short, whatever you find comfortable and meaningful should guide you in using the shawl.

Keep in mind, the prayer shawl is only a tool, designed to facilitate turning toward God in earnest and heartfelt prayer. If the prayer shawl helps you achieve that goal, then it is a useful tool. There is nothing magical or superstitious about its use. Using a prayer shawl doesn’t mean God will hear you “better” during prayer or be more inclined to answer prayers in a manner that you may wish to see. Conversely, not using a prayer shawl certainly does not prevent your prayers from being heard or from being any less effective than any other form of prayer.

If you feel uncomfortable using a prayer shawl or find that it does not help you in focusing on God but instead distracts you, then you should not use a prayer shawl. The prayer shawl represents an invitation, not an obligation.


#17

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