Are kids spending too much time on electronics then god


#1

do you think that kids are spending too much time on electronics then god


#2

I think we can be all guilty of that one. It is true that children have more to deal with that let us say those years ago. The fact that children have hardly any brothers and sisters and have too much on their plate they tend not to know about God while at home. It is not that children are slow in learning about God. On the contrary they are very smart and probably if were given the chance to learn about God will pick up alot more than we ever did. Now I am talking about the home. This is where most of the time the child will be and it is there where the child can learn more about God than anywhere else. I will venture to say not to blame sports or electronics or whatever but to put the blame on the parents. The parents are to be blamed for this. Remember the childhood of the late Holy Father John Paul II when he wrote that his first seminary was his own home. He can recall after the death of his mother how his father would be in constant prayers on his knees for a hour at a time. This impressed the young boy so much that he decided that if his father thought God is that important to spend an hour a day with so must he. We learn best from those around us. Thank God for those parents who will give time for God so that their children can imitate. You can have electronics, sports, and TV but please supplement it with your time with God. Your child will be always grateful and you will never regret the time you will give to God in the presence of your own children.


#3

[quote="avemaria2010, post:1, topic:223413"]
do you think that kids are spending too much time on electronics then god

[/quote]

How do you know that many kids use their electronic devices to draw closer to God? Electronics are a tool, it depends upon how you use them and for what that matters. My daughter uses her computer and various sites to explore her faith and meet other young Catholics. She uses her ipod to listen to Christian music. I wouldn't presume that its an either/or situation between electronics Vs. God.


#4

[quote="avemaria2010, post:1, topic:223413"]
do you think that kids are spending too much time on electronics then god

[/quote]

Whose money is it?

More than likely, the parents.

Do some parents spoil their kids rotten and buy them every new toy on the face of the earth? You bet.

If the kid earned the money, then he should be free to spend some of it on whatever he likes.


#5

[quote="avemaria2010, post:1, topic:223413"]
do you think that kids are spending too much time on electronics then god

[/quote]

Sad but true, electronics are being designed to addict children and people to their continued use.


#6

Definately. I am a teenager and I am guilty of spending way too much time on the computer. Sometimes it's hard to get off of facebook for a moment to do something important. I try to limit my time on the internet, but when I'm spending all day on the computer, my mom is sure to put a word in. I encourage all parents to get their kids off the computer or the X-box every once in a while for some family time or for prayers :)


#7

There is a lot of leveraging of obsessive-compulsive tendencies going on by electronics companies. I would offer MMORPGs such as World of Warcraft as an example of a business built on OCD; the more you play the more experience you get (and so more of the game is unlocked), but also the more real world money you sink into the game.

Ten years ago, something like Facebook would have been rightly labeled as anti-social. Today, it is "social networking." Many of my teenage confirmands have no idea that what they post on there is public record and will be archived by hundreds of servers and that the privacy settings have proven to be ineffective.

There is nothing wrong with video games, communication websites, etc. per se. I use both casually and occasionally, as I am doing right now. The problem is how certain of these products are being irresponsibly marketed to children and accepted by the culture (much like tobacco—while they don't cause cancer, the case could nevertheless be made that WOW, Facebook, and the like are addictive and make children antisocial and underactive).

St. Dymphna, pray for us.


#8

There is a lot of leveraging of obsessive-compulsive tendencies going on by electronics companies. I would offer MMORPGs such as World of Warcraft as an example of a business built on OCD; the more you play the more experience you get (and so more of the game is unlocked), but also the more real world money you sink into the game.

Ten years ago, something like Facebook would have been rightly labeled as anti-social. Today, it is "social networking." Many of my teenage confirmands have no idea that what they post on there is public record and will be archived by hundreds of servers and that the privacy settings have been problematic.

There is nothing wrong with video games, communication websites, etc. per se. I use both casually and occasionally, as I am doing right now. The problem is how certain of these products are being irresponsibly marketed to children and accepted by the culture.

There are parallels to how tobacco was marketed to children in years past. While they don't cause cancer, some scholars have stated that Facebook can be addictive and could cause users to be more antisocial and underactive.

St. Dymphna, pray for us.


#9

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.