Are the General Intercessions/ Petitions (Prayers of the Faithful) in your Masses often thinly-disguised leftist psychobabble?

Are the General Intercessions/Petitions (Prayers of the Faithful) in your Masses often thinly-disguised leftist psychobabble?

Many of them are, in my experience. I’ve often wondered who writes them.

catholicexchange.com/2004/11/06/93914/

the-tidings.com/2007/080307/difference.htm

Absolutely!

We hardly ever pray for the spiritually sick or lost souls. Instead every day we pray for those suffering from physical illness…duh, you are kind of missing the point. What good is bodily healthy if your soul is rotting to the core?

We never pray for an end to abortion, either.

It’s starting to go in that direction right now. It wasn’t like that a few weeks ago. Maybe it’s a wobble and will be back on track soon.:frowning:

All platitudes and a feel-good brand of theology. As noted above, the serious issues are never tackled.

You know, you could ask the priest to ask the parish to pray for an intention, like the souls in Purgatory. You have such a right as a Christian.

But stop talking trash about Mother Church and about the Mass, or a part of it. Be more respectful, charitable, and considerate to Jesus Christ.

No they are not. If fact, I have not attended a Mass in this diocese where they were.

You can ask for Masses to be said for your own intentions and you can also suggest certain intentions for the general prayers of the faithful. Simply contact your parish office.

Remember, we do always pray for the faithful departed during Mass no matter what the Prayers of the Faithful happen to be at that specific Mass.

There is a certain structure for the intercessions to follow

1 - prayers for the Church
2 - prayers for civil authorities & the salvation of the world
3 - prayers for those burdened with difficulties (poor, oppressed, sick)
4 - prayers for various particular needs of the local community

This structure comes from the GIRM # 70.

Nope.

I wonder if someone who agrees with the original post would give some examples of petitions they have actually heard in church, that they consider psychobabble. Up to now things are a bit vague.

Maybe not psychobabble, but depending on who writes the petitions, yes, they can have a political slant. My old parish had the organist/liturgical director/DRE write each weekend’s petitions. Throughout the Bush administration, we prayed for “enlightened leadership”. There were many times I remained silent because because of her slant. I think it really depends on who is composing such petitions and whether or not the pastor approves.

I seem to remember a piece on Time (?) about this topic. I think it came out last fall in time for the election. I’m really fuzzy on that though.

Chris

Often, these are “canned” petitions from the same people who publish the missallettes. If a parish orders missallettes, they will automatically send these suggested petitions on a regular basis, unless the pastor phones them and says not to send them;)

And yes, I have noticed a decidedly left-leaning slant to the petitions. Especially during the last election cycle. They all but mentioned the candidates by name. “Dear God, please please give us leaders who will see the wisdom of socialized medicine and end the oppressive capitalist stranglehold on our healthcare” (yes, that’s an exaggeration, but not by much, folks!)

Those who write petitions on the parish level will often use these as a resource, and so it’s only natural that the agenda will show-through, even if such is not at all the intention of the writer.

No.

E.g., we often pray that politicians would support the right to life for all human beings from conception to natural death. That doesn’t sound like psychobabble to me.

And that’s just one example.

I guess I’m blessed here.

Let’s see…mostly what I hear is prayers for an increase in vocations, an end to abortion, healing for the sick, for the repose of the souls of those who have died, for God to move in the lives of unbelievers, etc. And mine is not the most conservative of parishes. Could be due to the wisdom of our pastor, who, shortly after he was installed, invited anyone offering petitions NOT in line with Catholic teaching, to kindly take them outside. :smiley:

(I heard once that someone actually prayed for a sucessful abortion!) :eek:

Ours are usually for the deceased, for civil authorities to do what is right, for the pope, bishop, and priests, for an increase in vocations, and for the success of our new school.

Are the General Intercessions/Petitions (Prayers of the Faithful) in your Masses often thinly-disguised leftist psychobabble?

Many of them are, in my experience. I’ve often wondered who writes them.

catholicexchange.com/2004/11/06/93914/

the-tidings.com/2007/080307/difference.htm


“Wherever I go in the whole world, the thing that makes me the saddest is watching people receive communion in the hand.”
– Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta

As reported by Fr. George Rutler in 1989 when he asked her, “What do you think is the worst problem in the world today?”


**Why do I have the feeling that you have an agenda in asking this question–or maybe have your mind already made up?

[edited]**

Unfortunately, OCP also has its hands on the General Intercessions. :eek: That is why you get a lot of poltical correctness, very few prayers for the Holy Father and a lot of stuff that really does not belong there.

At the Cathedral, I would, from time to time, write up the petitions. In fact, for special diocesan Masses, I have done them as well. I made sure that we prayed for the Holy Father and for real needs, like the sanctity of life and more vocations.

“Wherever I go in the whole world, the thing that makes me the saddest is watching people receive communion in the hand.”
– Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta

As reported by Fr. George Rutler in 1989 when he asked her, “What do you think is the worst problem in the world today?”


Please remove this from your signature line. Blessed Theresa herself, as well as the Missionaries of Charity, have denied that she ever said this.

Not in our parish. Although we use some of the intentions that are in our missalettes (particularly the prayer for the Church which the missalette usually links to the readings of the day) the prayers are pretty general and apolitical, for example we might include a prayer for wisdom for a newly elected government without specifying that we want them to do x, y & z - believing that if God provides wisdom it will lead to x, y & z if that’s His will.

Samples of intercessions we have used:

For the families preparing for their children’s baptism, we pray to the Lord.

For couples preparing for marriage, we pray to the Lord.

For peace with justice throughout the world and in our own land; for those engaged in military action; and for the safety of the personnel of the Canadian Armed Forces, we pray to the Lord.

For all who engage in terrorism, blinded by the pride and the desire for vengeance, we pray to the Lord.

For the sick and for those who care for them, we pray to the Lord.

For those who have died and for those who mourn them, we pray to the Lord.

Our Church once threw this beauty of an intercession out: “For an end to poverty and the unjust distribution of resources, which leads to terrorism.”

Of course, this particular church also did a book study on Kerry Kennedy’s book, “Being Catholic Now” and literally is under the impression that President Obama is more Catholic than the Pope.

I use the sample texts found in the Sacramentary, with just a little bit of editing.

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