Are there any Christian religions that require . . .


#1

. . . . . . . more self sacrifice than the Catholic Church requires?


#2

[quote=mark a]. . . . . . . more self sacrifice than the Catholic Church requires?
[/quote]

Could define what you mean by self-sacrifice?


#3

Possibly Amish Mennonites. No modern devices that could detract form God or the Community. Actually there is a debate about cell phones right now that is rather interesting…


#4

And the fasting practices in the Eastern Churches (both Byzantine and Orthodox) are substantially stricter than Roman Catholics

(no meat , eggs or dairy at all during Great Lent) and fast from midnight before recieving the Eucharist.


#5

[quote=tkdnick]Could define what you mean by self-sacrifice?
[/quote]

I think I meant self denial. Did I?

I was thinking along the lines of no divorce, no artificial birth control, and the other “no’s”.

I was thinking that the Amish were tougher, but I don’t know anything about their other practices.

I see in the above post that the Eastern Rite Christians and do more too.

A late PM Mass would be tough to fast for.


#6

Amish (and most mennonites as well) see work as a way of worship so there are few labor saving devices in the home. Depending on the region there may or may not be cars. There is also great importance placed on every day worship. One of the key pars of the Mennonite belief system is that there is no division of worship, you worship in your day to day life just the same as you worship in church.

I’m Mennonite Bretheren (many of the same beliefs but we don’t shun and we also use modern devices) and we had some more traditional Mennonites in the church I grew up in. They are some of the most hard-working and honest people I know.


#7

[quote=Shlemele]Amish (and most mennonites as well) see work as a way of worship so there are few labor saving devices in the home. Depending on the region there may or may not be cars. There is also great importance placed on every day worship. One of the key pars of the Mennonite belief system is that there is no division of worship, you worship in your day to day life just the same as you worship in church.

I’m Mennonite Bretheren (many of the same beliefs but we don’t shun and we also use modern devices) and we had some more traditional Mennonites in the church I grew up in. They are some of the most hard-working and honest people I know.
[/quote]

I agree. I have known and met a few Amish and Mennonite people and they have all been very Christ-like. I admire their ability to live in the world but not be of the world. I think we could all take example from them in their dedication to living godly lives. I may not agree with all parts of their theology but I have always been impressed by their lifestyle. :bowdown2:


#8

Shakers

cheddar


#9

any of the religious sects where adherents live together in communities or communes separate from the surrounding society, with more or less uneasy ties to that society: Amish, Brethren, Shakers, Old Salem, Amana colony and the various 19th c utopian movements. My Kentucky relatives still cling to an extremely severe fundamentalist sect - no dancing, alcohol, card playing, swearing, women wear dresses with long sleeves etc. and keep aloof from neighbors and co-workers. JWs are very disciplined as to their associates and required missionary activity. Mormons and SDA have dietary rules and Mormons have strict discipline over certain aspects of family life, and required missionary service.

Given that mainstream Protestant religions are mostly based on faith to the exclusion of works, this sectarian trend emphasizing “lifestyle choices” is at least as much a reaction and protest against Lutheran and Calvinist theology as it is against Catholic doctrine and practice. Methodism became such a division with the established Anglican church, and was based in part on a “method” or strict rules for living and behavior.


#10

[quote=cheddarsox]Shakers

cheddar
[/quote]

What are shakers?


#11

[quote=puzzleannie]Amish, Brethren, Shakers, Old Salem, Amana colony and the various 19th c utopian movements. .
[/quote]

Are these Trinitarians?

My Kentucky relatives still cling to an extremely severe fundamentalist sect - no dancing, alcohol, card playing, swearing, women wear dresses with long sleeves etc. and keep aloof from neighbors and co-workers.

The only one of the above I think is actually bad is keeping aloof from neighbors and coworkers.

JWs are very disciplined as to their associates and required missionary activity.

I have been aquainted with a few JW’s. They were straight-up as 6 o’clock.

Given that mainstream Protestant religions are mostly based on faith to the exclusion of works, this sectarian trend emphasizing “lifestyle choices” is at least as much a reaction and protest against Lutheran and Calvinist theology as it is against Catholic doctrine and practice.

I don’t quite understand what you mean here. Could you elaborate?

Thanks.


#12

Shakers, Mennonites, and some Babtists are part of a movement called the Anababtist movement. Some of the more old-schools believe that we need to be apart from the world (hence some of the alofness). It is a weakness the my church has been working on and in my town at least overcoming. I’m not sure about the shakers but I’m pretty sure all Anababtists believe in the trinity.


#13

[quote=Brendan]And the fasting practices in the Eastern Churches (both Byzantine and Orthodox) are substantially stricter than Roman Catholics

(no meat , eggs or dairy at all during Great Lent) and fast from midnight before recieving the Eucharist.
[/quote]

Eastern Catholics are “Roman Catholics”. They’re just not Latin Rite. Both Eastern Catholics and Eastern Orthodox use the Byzantine Divine Liturgy.


#14

[quote=mark a]What are shakers?
[/quote]

The shakers are a religious group started in the 1800’s by a woman (sorry details escape me). They lived in farm communities. Men in one house, women in another. They worked industriously and sold surplus to the outsiders. They had strict codes of dress, behavior and work ethic. They believed work was a form of worship, and took great care in design and industry.

No contact was allowed between the sexes. The Shaker commuities adopted orphans and raised them, offering them membership in the community or to join “the world” when they reached adulthood.

They got the name Shakers (I believed they referred to themselves as brethren, and within the community as brother and sister) because their weekly worship services included singing and dancing in praise of the Lord. There was a sense of mysticism in them, the words and tunes to the songs, and the steps to the dances were often mystically inspired. A brother or sister would “see” the revelation of a new song or dance. They also have a collection of mystic/inspired art which depicts the Lord’s relationship to His people.

I do not know much about their theology, or belief in the Trinity etc. I have visited some old Shaker villiages, and done a little reading on them. There are a few very old shakers still living, and a few younger converts as well.

cheddar


#15

I don’t know about the fasting and abstinence, but Mormons requires you to donate 10% of your salary to the Church and they give an additional 2 to 3 percnt of salary to the poor. PLUS they give up 2 years of their life to go on these missionary journeys.

They are by far the most generous of Christian groups as far as donations goes. I guess that is why they can build huge gold plated temples.

wc


#16

[quote=Semper Fi]Eastern Catholics are “Roman Catholics”. They’re just not Latin Rite. Both Eastern Catholics and Eastern Orthodox use the Byzantine Divine Liturgy.
[/quote]

I don’t want to get to far off topic, but my feeble mind had it laid out like this:
[list]
*]Roman = Latin
*]Eastern, Byzantine, and others do not = Roman or Latin
*]All of the above are Catholic, not necessarily Roman Catholic
[/list]Is this correct?


#17

[quote=Semper Fi]Eastern Catholics are “Roman Catholics”. They’re just not Latin Rite. Both Eastern Catholics and Eastern Orthodox use the Byzantine Divine Liturgy.
[/quote]

I don’t understand how you can assume all of this.

Eastern Catholics are in no way Roman. (some of them might have had some Latinization, but that’s it.) We are all simply Catholic. Being Catholic implies our Communion with the Bishop of Rome.

I’m sure you know that there are 8 Rites of the Catholic Church.
The Latin or Roman Rite being the largest. The other 7 are as follows: Byzantine,Maronite, Armenian, East Syrian, West Syrian, Coptic, Ethiopian

The Eastern Catholic Churches are in Communion with Rome. They have a separate Code of Cannon Laws as well as Traditions. Most of which I find are much more strict, in terms of Fasting and “Self Denial”

Brad


#18

I believe Semper Fi placed quotation marks around Roman Catholic to say that Eastern Catholics belong to the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church that the outside world mistakenly calls “Roman Catholic”.

If I am wrong in that assumption, please correct me.

Maranatha,
Hans


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