Are these sins?


#1

Sorry if this looks like a lot…but I have a few questions. is listening to impure music a mortal sin or venial? (like most rap). is telling impure jokes a mortal sin or venial? (told between teenage boys). Also I created a fake Facebook page and friended a few of my friends to see if they would friend someone they didn’t know (there was a theory that they would) is that a mortal or venial sin? or a sin at all? And finally if you have a impure thought about girls and guys do we have to specify it was about ‘girls and guys’ in confession or would ‘impure thoughts’ be ok? I’m going to confession Friday and I would like a little clarification before I go. Thanks in advance :shrug:


#2

These are all questions for your pastor in confession, not an internet forum.


#3

Sorry if this looks like a lot…but I have a few questions. is listening to impure music a mortal sin or venial? (like most rap). is telling impure jokes a mortal sin or venial? (told between teenage boys). Also I created a fake Facebook page and friended a few of my friends to see if they would friend someone they didn’t know (there was a theory that they would) is that a mortal or venial sin? or a sin at all? And finally if you have a impure thought about girls and guys do we have to specify it was about ‘girls and guys’ in confession or would ‘impure thoughts’ be ok? I’m going to confession Friday and I would like a little clarification before I go. Thanks in advance :shrug:


#4

You sound like a younger person in your post. My best advice: I would take these questions to your confessor on Friday. He will be in the best position to ask questions about the circumstances and give you the appropriate guidance.

I suspect you are asking here because you do not want to ask a priest who might know you, you might be embarrassed, etc. Rest assured you are probably not going to be asking about something the priest has never heard before.

For your specific questions, well it depends:

“impure” music - what makes the music impure? the lyrics? the listener’s intent? the performer’s intent? the perceived message of the song? - the list goes on.

“impure” jokes - again, the evaluation of what makes it impure needs to be done.

“impure” thoughts - same thing.

The reason I say this is illustrated by a story - I have heard from many priests people will come to confession and confess they missed Mass through their own fault. When the priest digs a little deeper, it often happens that there was no sin because it was not a Holy Day of obligation (or a Sunday), or they were prevented from attending Mass because of things outside of their control. So while it is a mortal sin to miss Mass on a Holy Day of obligation through your own willful act, it is not a sin under other circumstances.

There are things that are intrinsically sinful all the time. I suggest you ask your priest to explain the differences to you.


#5

I would suggest reading paragraphs 1852 to 1869 (a bit too long to reproduce here) of the Catechism of the Catholic Church (usccb.org/beliefs-and-teachings/what-we-believe/catechism/catechism-of-the-catholic-church/epub/index.cfm#). It will explain both mortal and venial sins and the proliferation of sin.

Another help might be to prepare for confession by using a guide such as the one from Divine Mercy (divinemercysunday.com/pdf/ConfessionGuide2.pdf)

Even using the Catechism of the Catholic Church, I am not going to run through the items you mention and state/judge whether they are (a) mortal (b) venial © weaknesses or (d) not a sin. I would recommend preparing for confession and trusting in the Sacrament. The priest will give you the counsel and guidance to help you move forwards on your journey of faith.

God bless.


#6

The question you should be asking is whether certain things are grave matter.

The three essential conditions for a sin to be considered mortal are: grave matter, full knowledge, and complete consent of the will.

Therefore you should have your confessor help you decide which things are grave matter. Some grave matter is listed explicitly in the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

[quote=“Catechism of the Catholic Church”]1858 Grave matter is specified by the Ten Commandments, corresponding to the answer of Jesus to the rich young man: "Do not kill, Do not commit adultery, Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Do not defraud, Honor your father and your mother."132 The gravity of sins is more or less great: murder is graver than theft. One must also take into account who is wronged: violence against parents is in itself graver than violence against a stranger.

[/quote]

So you can see that all Ten of the Commandments are considered grave matter. That alone is not enough for them to be mortal sins for everyone. For a sin to be mortal, that person must also have full knowledge of the sinful nature, as well as complete consent of the will to commit the sin. A person who is forced at gunpoint to steal a television set does not commit a mortal sin, because he did not consent to the act himself. His will was compromised by the threat of bodily harm.

I hope this helps. Please be aware that some people suffer from scrupulosity, which is a mental disorder related to OCD. Scrupulosity causes a person to worry over much about committing sin and causes him to doubt his state of grace constantly. On the other hand, many young people believe that by avoiding only mortal sins, they can stay “safe” in a state of grace. This is a false dichotomy. The object should be to avoid all sins. Venial sins can be confessed to a priest as well, and this is a laudable practice. So if you find yourself committing a sin and you doubt that it is grave matter, then consider bringing it to your confessor soon. It is always a good thing to make frequent confessions, regardless of your state of grace. And after committing a mortal sin, immediately seek reconciliation with a priest, lest you die an unprovided death.


#7

Baltimore Catechism

52 Q. What is actual sin?
A. Actual sin is any willful thought, word, deed, or omission contrary to the law of God. Three ways we may sin, by “thought”–allowing our minds to dwell on sinful things; “word”–by cursing, telling lies, etc.; “deed”–by any kind of bad action. But to be sins, these thoughts, words and deeds must be willful; that is, we must fully know what we are doing, and be free in doing it. Then they must be “contrary to the law of God”; that is, violate some law He commands us to obey, whether it be a law He gave directly Himself, or through His Church. We can also violate God’s law by neglecting to observe it, and thus sin, provided the neglect be willful, and the thing neglected commanded by God or by His Church.

53 Q. How many kinds of actual sin are there?
A. There are two kinds of actual sin–mortal and venial.

383 Q. What are we commanded by the ninth Commandment?
A. We are commanded by the ninth Commandment to keep ourselves pure in thought and desire.

(From A. 59)
“Lust” is the desire for sins of the flesh; for impure thoughts, words, or actions. It comes under the Sixth and Ninth Commandments, and includes all that is forbidden by those Commandments. It is the habit of always violating, or of desiring to violate, the Sixth and Ninth Commandments. Lust and impurity mean the same thing. The followers of lust are, generally, neglect of prayer, neglect of the Sacraments, and final loss of faith.

[Not from the Catechism: St. Thomas Aquinas categorized the parts of lust. The parts of lust are the species or types of lustful sins: fornication, adultery, incest, seduction, rape, unnatural vice. Unnatural vice means the thought or act is *not between a man and woman.]

384 Q. What is forbidden by the ninth Commandment?
A. The ninth Commandment forbids unchaste thoughts, desires of another’s wife or husband, and all other unlawful impure thoughts and desires.

385 Q. Are impure thoughts and desires always sins?
A. Impure thoughts and desires are always sins, unless they displease us and we try to banish them.

59 Q. Which are the chief sources of sin?
A. The chief sources of sin are seven: Pride, Covetousness, Lust, Anger, Gluttony, Envy, and Sloth; and they are commonly called capital sins.

A “source” is that from which anything else comes. The source of a river is the little spring on the Mountainside where the river first begins. This little stream runs down the mountain, and as it goes along gathers strength and size from other little streams running into it. It cuts its way through the meadows, and marks the course and is the beginning of a great river, sweeping all things before it and carrying them off to the ocean. Now, if someone in the beginning had stopped up the little spring on the mountain–the first source of the river–there would have been no river in that particular place. It is just the same with sin. There is one sin that is the source, and as it goes along like the stream it gathers strength; other sins follow it and are united with it. Again: each of these “capital sins,” as they are called, is like a leader or a captain in an army, with so many others under him and following him. Now, if you take away the head, the other members of the body will perish; so if you destroy the capital sin, the other sins that follow it will disappear also. Very few persons have all the capital sins: some are guilty of one of them, some of two, some of three, but few if any are guilty of them all. The one we are guilty of, and which is the cause of all our other sins, is called our predominant sin or our ruling passion. We should try to find it out, and labor to overcome it.

*213 **Q. **When is our confession entire?
**A. **Our confession is entire when we tell the number and kinds of our sins and the circumstances which change their nature.

“Number”–the exact number, if you know it; as, for example, when we miss Mass we can generally tell exactly the number of times. But when we tell lies, for instance, we may not know the exact number: then we say how often in the day, or that it is a habit with us, etc.

“Kinds”–whether they are cursing, or stealing, or lying, etc.

“Circumstances which change their nature.” In the case of stealing, for example, you need not tell whether it was from a grocery, a bakery, or dry-goods store you stole, for that circumstance does not change the nature of the sin: you have simply to tell the amount you took. But if you stole from a church you would have to tell that, because that is a circumstance that gives the sin of stealing a new character, and makes it sacrilegious stealing. Or if you stole from a poor beggar all he possessed in the world, so that you left him starving, that would be a circumstance making your sin worse, and so you would have to tell it. Therefore you have to tell any circumstance that really makes your sin much worse or less than it seems; all other circumstances you need not tell: they will only confuse you, and make you forget your sins and waste the priest’s time.


#8

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