Are they married?


#1

If two Christans get married by a minister, are they marrried, and is a catholic allowed to attend the wedding?


#2

[quote=Emly]If two Christans get married by a minister, are they marrried, and is a catholic allowed to attend the wedding?
[/quote]

If two non-Catholic Christians are legally married by their minister, it is indeed a valid marriage, though not a sacramental one. A Catholic may attend as long as the ceremony doesn’t replace his or her Sunday Mass obligation.


#3

[quote=Fidelis]If two non-Catholic Christians are legally married by their minister, it is indeed a valid marriage, though not a sacramental one. A Catholic may attend as long as the ceremony doesn’t replace his or her Sunday Mass obligation.
[/quote]

A marriage between two baptised Christians is sacramental,( as long as it doesn’t involve a Catholic marrying outside of the Church w/o dispensation)


#4

What if there is a marriage between a Protestant and a non-practicing Catholic (at a Protestant church)? Would I be allowed to attend this wedding?


#5

[quote=Emly]If two Christans get married by a minister, are they marrried, and is a catholic allowed to attend the wedding?
[/quote]

Two non-Catholics seeking marriage in their own church are recognized by the Catholic Church as married and yes a Catholic can attend.

If either party is Catholic, then the Catholic must receive a dispensation to marry outside of the Catholic Church. Assuming they completed the proper paperwork and received persmission to marry, then yes it’s ok to go to the wedding.


#6

[quote=Fidelis]If two non-Catholic Christians are legally married by their minister, it is indeed a valid marriage, though not a sacramental one.
[/quote]

If both persons are baptized, the marriage is a Sacrament even if they are non-Catholics.


#7

[quote=Atreyu]What if there is a marriage between a Protestant and a non-practicing Catholic (at a Protestant church)? Would I be allowed to attend this wedding?
[/quote]

If the Catholic has made a formal act of leaving the Church-- such as renouncing the faith, joining the Protestant church, etc-- then they are no longer considered Catholic.

You could attend, but that would be up to you and what sort of situation it was and what message you think it might send. You are not “forbidden” from attending if that’s what you are asking.

The non-practicing Catholic is not bound by Catholic Canon Law if they have formally left the Church.


#8

Basically she is a cradle Catholic who now goes to church perhaps once or twice a year. I guess for me, it would send a very negative message if I chose not to attend, and that’s something I am very reluctant to do.


#9

what about a jew married by a rrabbei?

What if their prosstant but don’t believe marrige is a sacorment?

Thanks


#10

[quote=1ke]If both persons are baptized, the marriage is a Sacrament even if they are non-Catholics.
[/quote]

I would think that might be qualified by intent. If they intended a permanent, covenantal marriage, that would be a sacrament. If they saw the ceremony as more of a cultural rite, and did not intend to permanence, I don’t believe it would be considered a sacrament.

The parallel is in baptism: baptism is valid if it follows proper form and matter (Trinitarian formula and water), even if preformed by a non-believer, as long as the non-believer intended to do what the Church does in baptism.


#11

[quote=Fidelis]If two non-Catholic Christians are legally married by their minister, it is indeed a valid marriage, though not a sacramental one. A Catholic may attend as long as the ceremony doesn’t replace his or her Sunday Mass obligation.
[/quote]

If two non-Catholic Christians who are free to marry are legally married by their minister, it is indeed a valid marriage and a Sacrament.


#12

[quote=Atreyu]Basically she is a cradle Catholic who now goes to church perhaps once or twice a year. I guess for me, it would send a very negative message if I chose not to attend, and that’s something I am very reluctant to do.
[/quote]

I would speak with her and explain why you will not attend the wedding. Maybe that is what she needs to hear to get her derailed faith back on the track.


#13

[quote=otm]I would think that might be qualified by intent. If they intended a permanent, covenantal marriage, that would be a sacrament. If they saw the ceremony as more of a cultural rite, and did not intend to permanence, I don’t believe it would be considered a sacrament.

[/quote]

Just like every Catholic marriage, a non-Catholic marriage between baptized persons ** is presumed to be a Sacrament** by the Catholic Church on its face.

Only a tribunal examination of the marriage could determine that a defect or impediment existed such as you describe.


#14

[quote=1ke]Just like every Catholic marriage, a non-Catholic marriage between baptized persons ** is presumed to be a Sacrament** by the Catholic Church on its face.

Only a tribunal examination of the marriage could determine that a defect or impediment existed such as you describe.
[/quote]

That I don’t question. It seemed that the statement to which I had replied was perhaps a bit over broad, as many Protestants do not have much, if any, sacramental theology, and may not intend what the Church intends.

The presumption may be there, but it would seem that there may be more instances where the presumption would be overcome.


#15

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