Are we talking, yet?


#1

When one finds an otherwise amiable person taking an intolerant position on either side of almost any issue, quite often it turns out to be a matter of defining terms. Let’s see. The question is, “What is a Christian?”

What would a Protestant say?

What would a Catholic?


#2

My Protestant answer: A Christian is anyone who believes that Jesus was the Son of God; that he died on the cross for the forgiveness of sins and TRUSTS in the redemptive work. I don’t see it as a Catholic thing or a Protestant thing, because I see those things as man-made. In simpliest terms I would include anyone who says I believe Jesus was the Son of God and I try my best to live for Him.


#3

My Catholic answer:

Christian. A person who is baptized.

Modern Catholic Dictionary, John A. Hardon, S.J.


#4

My answer is, a christian is one who has taken on the nature of Jesus Christ and walks in His Love dayly. :smiley:


#5

[quote=carol marie]My Protestant answer: A Christian is anyone who believes that Jesus was the Son of God; that he died on the cross for the forgiveness of sins and TRUSTS in the redemptive work. I don’t see it as a Catholic thing or a Protestant thing, because I see those things as man-made. In simpliest terms I would include anyone who says I believe Jesus was the Son of God and I try my best to live for Him.
[/quote]

The Catholic Church is God-made – founded by Jesus Christ, Son of God, Second Person of the Blessed Trinity, for the salvation of the world (Mt 16:18-19 et al.). This is attested by many writers, including the sacred authors of the NT and the Early Church Fathers, from its birth in Jerusalem on Pentecost in 33 A.D. to the present day – a continuum of 2,000 years. The history of Christianity is the history of the Catholic Church.

All Protestant churches are man-made, founded by various men and women in and after the 16th century. We know the names of their founders and the dates of their origin from the historical record. There are several thousand of them.

Peace be to you and to all who post at Catholic Answers.

JMJ Jay
Ex-Southern Baptist, ex-agnostic, ex-atheist, ecstatic to be Catholic!


#6

I had previously thought that the Catholic Church was founded by Jesus when he said “Upon this rock Peter…” but now I’m not so sure because we learned in RCIA class the the Orthodox churches were also “in it” so to speak from the very beginning. We were told that they helped put together the Bible so how do we know that the RCC didn’t split from the true church (Orthodox ?) I’m not saying I believe this to be true… I have no idea. But I learned that the Catholic Church became “official” over 300 years after Jesus said, “Upon this rock Peter…” The Catholic Church may very well be THE original Church… but how do you know for sure???


#7

Okay, these few responses are enough to make my point. It is meaningless to get upset or feel threatened should you be speaking with a non-Catholic Christian who says that most, if not all, Catholics are not Christians: you are not speaking the same language! It is like talking to a Mormon who declares that Jesus is the Son of God. It sounds good, but don’t be fooled. What a Mormon means by the title, “Son of God,” is utter blasphemy.

Peace in Christ,
Dan


#8

[quote=Dan Blake]When one finds an otherwise amiable person taking an intolerant position on either side of almost any issue, quite often it turns out to be a matter of defining terms. Let’s see. The question is, “What is a Christian?”

What would a Protestant say?

What would a Catholic?
[/quote]

I have been taught that that there are 5 signs of “Christian” membership - profession of faith in:

10 Baptism
2)Triune God
3)Incarnation
4)Resurrection
5) Eternal Life


#9

[quote=Katholikos]My Catholic answer:

Christian. A person who is baptized.

Modern Catholic Dictionary, John A. Hardon, S.J.
[/quote]

I don’t believe baptism enough to be Christian.

I myself, was baptized Catholic, but am not currently practicing any Christian faith.

Does that still make me Christian?

Baptism may be a part of it, but it’s not everything.


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