Are you afraid of Santa?


#1

The Rudolph and the Occult thread got me thinking. Should we ignore the whole Santa myth with our kids. I don't know that I would do the Santa tradition simply because as a kid Santa scared the heck out me but the idea of him was fun. I wouldn't want to lie to my kids but I wouldn't want to take anything away from them either. It's a big dilema. :shrug::D

PS I don't have kids and may never have them I just pose this question for fun really :-)


#2

I was never afraid... and my kids have never been afraid...
But if you're looking for a good laugh on the subject check out...
sketchysantas.com/

ENJOY! :D


#3

no :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:


#4

Nope.

Santa comes to my Childrens Hospital:):) AND it's Catholic


#5

Well.. I was when I was little. But anything dressed up like the Easter Bunny or mascots creep me out too.

For what it's worth, I won't be telling my children presents come from santa. But I'm not starting a debate on this, because that's up to each parent.


#6

Nope, just clowns.


#7

Why did the other thread get deleted? Was it something I said?


#8

After visiting sketchy santas I'm a bit more paranoid. The easter bunnies always frightened me as a child.


#9

[quote="Em_in_FL, post:2, topic:179111"]
I was never afraid... and my kids have never been afraid...
But if you're looking for a good laugh on the subject check out...
sketchysantas.com/

ENJOY! :D

[/quote]

This is hilarious. I became a fan of the page on facebook!

Sketchy Santa Fan page!


#10

[quote="Sierrah, post:1, topic:179111"]
...I wouldn't want to lie to my kids...

[/quote]

Hello,

Just wanted you to know that the church does not consider telling your children about Santa as a "lie" in the sense that it is a sin. Just wanted to make sure that you knew that, it is okay to participate in childhood fantasies, myths and stories and be well within the guidelines of the church.

Whether or not to have Santa is personal. Whatever you decide when you have children is up to you, I just wanted to point out that it is not a sinful "lie".


#11

[quote="Monicad, post:10, topic:179111"]
Hello,

Just wanted you to know that the church does not consider telling your children about Santa as a "lie" in the sense that it is a sin. Just wanted to make sure that you knew that, it is okay to participate in childhood fantasies, myths and stories and be well within the guidelines of the church.

Whether or not to have Santa is personal. Whatever you decide when you have children is up to you, I just wanted to point out that it is not a sinful "lie".

[/quote]

That's a GREAT point to be aware of.

I think (just my opinion, I'm not a parent) that kids grow up too fast sometimes. Let them be kids, have fun with Santa, etc.


#12

Post: To Raise your Kids believing in Santa or not............. someone just posted a *wonderful *piece integrating Santa with St. Nick..........


#13

[quote="Sierrah, post:1, topic:179111"]
The Rudolph and the Occult thread got me thinking. Should we ignore the whole Santa myth with our kids. I don't know that I would do the Santa tradition simply because as a kid Santa scared the heck out me but the idea of him was fun. I wouldn't want to lie to my kids but I wouldn't want to take anything away from them either. It's a big dilema. :shrug::D

PS I don't have kids and may never have them I just pose this question for fun really :-)

[/quote]

As Santa Claus is an actual saint, and the tradition of giving gifts dates back to the Three Magi, I see nothing wrong with it. And certainly nothing occult.


#14

Do you have a source for this? I’m not about to claim that it’s on the level of grave matter or mortal sin or something like that, but to say it’s not a lie at all just defies all reason.

To be clear, I’m not talking about the icon of Santa in general, “playing” Santa, or teaching your children about the real St. Nicholas. I’m talking about seriously telling your kids that there’s this guy who flies around the world every Christmas dropping presents through chimneys and keeping them under that false impression.


#15

You must be fun at parties.

Not every single thing in life has to be deathy (and I use the word intentionally) serious. Santa Claus, trick-or-treating on Halloween, making believe you are Superman, these things are all part of a normal, healthy childhood.


#16

"He sees you when you're sleeping, he knows when you're awake..." :eek:


#17

IMHO Santa adds to Christianity...IF you Grwnups will allow.


#18

[quote="Sailor_Kenshin, post:15, topic:179111"]
You must be fun at parties.

Not every single thing in life has to be deathy (and I use the word intentionally) serious. Santa Claus, trick-or-treating on Halloween, making believe you are Superman, these things are all part of a normal, healthy childhood.

[/quote]

I asked Father Mike, one time , "If there was a Superman"?

Father Mike replied..."kimmie, the greatest Superman I know is Jesus".

Father Mike, in his wisdom allowed me to enjoy Superman....BUT I saw Jesus:):)

As Always, just my thoughts

We don't need no stinkin Grinch's:D


#19

[quote="exoflare, post:14, topic:179111"]
Do you have a source for this? I'm not about to claim that it's on the level of grave matter or mortal sin or something like that, but to say it's not a lie at all just defies all reason.

To be clear, I'm not talking about the icon of Santa in general, "playing" Santa, or teaching your children about the real St. Nicholas. I'm talking about seriously telling your kids that there's this guy who flies around the world every Christmas dropping presents through chimneys and keeping them under that false impression.

[/quote]

Hello Exoflare,

Thank you for asking, yes I do have a source my source is actually this website on the "Ask An Apologist" forum. If you go there and search this topic you will find this question has come up, and yes it is okay to "seriously tell your children there is this guy who flies around the world every Christmas"

If someone chooses not too because they are not comfortable that is a personal family decision...however for those that choose to it is just a reminder that it is not a sin.

I cutted/pasted here I hope this helps. A person asked since the Catechism instructs us that lying is a sin, then why is it okay to lie about Santa?

**Michelle Arnold's answer is here:

Without knowing which passages in the Catechism of the Catholic Church you are thinking of, I cannot comment on them. What I can do is to comment on the idea of telling children stories of Santa, the Easter Bunny, and the Tooth Fairy.

It is not lying to create stories for young children. That is basically what is done when parents tell their children of imaginary creatures such as the Easter Bunny and the Tooth Fairy. From the beginning of time parents have spun such tales for the entertainment and education of their children. Rather than "lying," it can be considered "myth-making." Myths are a means of conveying certain truths pictorially rather than didactically. When parents tell their children tales of the Easter Bunny and the Tooth Fairy, the larger truths that are being conveyed mythically are that we are part of a larger universe and are watched over and cared for by good spirits whom we cannot yet know empirically. This can be considered groundwork for later introduction to the communion of saints.

As for Santa, he is based on a real person: St. Nicholas, an early Catholic bishop who is a patron saint of children because of positive interactions he was believed to have had with children during his life. The stories that have been based upon St. Nicholas are what we call legend. Legends are generally non-historical or unverifiable stories passed down through the ages about a person or group of people. While Catholic parents may want to make sure children know about the real-life saint behind the Santa Claus legend, there is nothing wrong with passing on pious legends to children.

The real question probably comes when children find out that their parents are the ones who are providing the Santa gifts, Easter candy, and Tooth Fairy money. In my experience, parents tend to worry too much about how their children will receive this news. Many children through many generations simply accept this information as a part of growing up, and, in fact, will "collude" with parents to keep the myth going by not letting their parents in on the fact that they know The Truth in order to avoid spoiling their parents' fun. But, if a child does feel betrayed to find out The Truth, then the parent can explain the context of storytelling and myth-making, perhaps pointing out to the child that Let's Pretend is a game for people of all ages.

Of course, it should be said, if a parent does not feel comfortable taking this approach to Santa, the Easter Bunny, and the Tooth Fairy, the parent is free to leave out such stories from his child's education. He should though teach the child to be sensitive to not spoiling the fun of other children by telling them that such characters are Not Real.**


#20

Well, I don’t have any problems with anything you just mentioned so I don’t see why you bothered to mention them or what relevance it has to what I said. The fact remains that if your kid wants to know whether some guy really does fly around dropping presents down chimneys and you tell him or her that there is, then you’re lying to your kid. The mere mention of Santa Clause, trick-or-treat and playing make believe is a red herring and does nothing to address that point.


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