"Are You Holy Enough To Receive Communion?"


#1

Quick test.......

buzzfeed.com/ellievhall/are-you-holy-enough-to-receive-communion

(Assume #2 includes room for Catholic converts baptized outside of the Catholic Church....choose "yes" if this applies to you)


#2

Apart from the fact that the word holy is not appropriate (nobodybis holy enough to receive Communion, in fact, we proclaim to God: you alone are the holy one) the page was nice indeed. I am sure a few people would be surprised at the answers ;)


#3

Hm, good point, RC.


#4

Huh! I'm not impressed. Being opposed to the death penalty means I might not be eligible to receive Communion. We don't have the death penalty in this country but if we did I would still be opposed to it.


#5

A very misleading quiz. The title doesn’t match the quiz to start with…of course, it’s only meant to be a bit of fun.


#6

Ugh, some of the wording on the parts I looked at was terrible and/or misleading. :p


#7

Ha ha, they got Grumpy Cat in there (#20). :smiley:

#2 does seem confusing for converts. Maybe they could have added a “convert clause” to the question.

Beneath this question, before you get it “wrong” or “right”, the quiz says that “My stance on the death penalty does not affect my ability to receive communion.” :thumbsup:


#8

I already know I'm not in a state of grace (have not yet had my First Confession and Communion; hopefully this Mother's Day will be the day! :)), but it was fun taking the quiz nevertheless.


#9

From the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom (Byzantine Rite): "Holy Gifts to Holy People."

Catechism of the Catholic Church 1988 Through the power of the Holy Spirit we take part in Christ's Passion by dying to sin, and in his Resurrection by being born to a new life; we are members of his Body which is the Church, branches grafted onto the vine which is himself:36[INDENT] [God] gave himself to us through his Spirit. By the participation of the Spirit, we become communicants in the divine nature. . . . For this reason, those in whom the Spirit dwells are divinized.37

36 Cf. 1 Cor 12; Jn 15:1-4.
37 St. Athanasius, Ep. Serap. 1,24:PG 26,585 and 588.
[/INDENT]


#10

What a stupid test !


#11

It wasn’t testing “stupid”. This is a “stupid test”:

youtu.be/TmeBAJWDbB4

(after the advertisement, if there is one.)

:smiley: :smiley: :smiley:


#12

[quote="Vico, post:9, topic:321814"]
From the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom (Byzantine Rite): "Holy Gifts to Holy People."

[/quote]

After the priest says the above, the people reply: "One is Holy, one is Lord, Jesus Christ, to the glory of God the Father. Amen." :D


#13

You folks are a tough bunch. It's interesting those who object to it, but can't say why or what is wrong with it. The catechism is cited to support every point. The test is not really meant for "fun". It's a legitimate test meant to inform, which was posted by my friend, a priest, on twitter. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

God bless :)


#14

Question 2 is not really accurate: "Have you been baptized in the Catholic Church?" My answer to that is no, because I was baptized as an infant in a Lutheran church by my father (a Lutheran pastor). But I was later received into the Catholic Church as an adult, which means I can receive communion (or at least, my having been baptized outside of the Catholic Church doesn't prohibit me from doing so).

I also have problems with Question 3. It describes transubstantiation as a "physical transformation" but if it were thus, the accidents of bread and wine would no longer be present. The substance is changed into the body, blood, soul and divinity of Christ, but it is a transubstantiation, not a transformation.


#15

[quote="smh1978, post:14, topic:321814"]
Question 2 is not really accurate: "Have you been baptized in the Catholic Church?" My answer to that is no, because I was baptized as an infant in a Lutheran church by my father (a Lutheran pastor). But I was later received into the Catholic Church as an adult, which means I can receive communion (or at least, my having been baptized outside of the Catholic Church doesn't prohibit me from doing so).

I also have problems with Question 3. It describes transubstantiation as a "physical transformation" but if it were thus, the accidents of bread and wine would no longer be present. The substance is changed into the body, blood, soul and divinity of Christ, but it is a transubstantiation, not a transformation.

[/quote]

With the reception of the Holy Spirit in baptism comes incorporation into the one body (Rom 8:1f, 9f; I Cor 12:12f). Per the CDF:It is possible, according to Catholic doctrine, to affirm correctly that the Church of Christ is present and operative in the churches and ecclesial Communities not yet fully in communion with the Catholic Church, on account of the elements of sanctification and truth that are present in them.[9] Nevertheless, the word “subsists” can only be attributed to the Catholic Church alone precisely because it refers to the mark of unity that we profess in the symbols of the faith (I believe... in the “one” Church); and this “one” Church subsists in the Catholic Church.[10]

vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cfaith/documents/rc_con_cfaith_doc_20070629_responsa-quaestiones_en.html

From the survey:3. Do you believe that the bread and wine of the Eucharist disappear at the moment of consecration during Mass and LITERALLY become the body and blood of Jesus Christ?
The substance is what it really is, the accidents, the appearance. It is a real change.

See Modern Catholic Dictionary on Transubstantiation: After transubstantiation, the accidents of bread and wine do not inhere in any subject or substance whatever. Yet they are not make-believe; they are sustained in existence by divine power. (Etym. Latin trans-, so as to change + substantia, substance: transubstantiatio, change of substance.)


#16

The appearances, exactly. The word "disappear" is misleading. The bread and wine don't "disappear"; their appearance remains.

And the title of the quiz reminds me of a class for Eucharistic ministers about 30 years ago, and one of the questions we were asked was "Have you ever received Communion unworthily?"

"Every time," responded one of the new Eucharistic ministers, without hesitation. Of course she didn't mean that she was always in a state of mortal sin, she meant that she and the rest of us are not worthy of the Eucharist. There is even a hymn about that.


#17

[quote="CleverUserName, post:13, topic:321814"]
It's interesting those who object to it, but can't say why or what is wrong with it.

[/quote]

That I "cannot say" does not follow from the fact that I did not say. :)

[quote="smh1978, post:14, topic:321814"]
Question 2 is not really accurate

[/quote]

Correct. For the reasons smh1978 mentioned above, nearly everything the quiz said here is wrong.

[quote="smh1978, post:14, topic:321814"]
I also have problems with Question 3. It describes transubstantiation as a "physical transformation" but if it were thus, the accidents of bread and wine would no longer be present. The substance is changed into the body, blood, soul and divinity of Christ, but it is a transubstantiation, not a transformation.

[/quote]

I agree. What was said in Question 3 was awful.

The question is itself already somewhat problematic: It would be far better to say I believe the bread and wine are substantially changed into the body and blood of Jesus Christ.

But the content below is worse:

The use of the terms "literal, physical" is ambiguous and therefore misleading and/or confusing (see the numerous discussions on CAF and elsewhere regarding why), which is one of the reasons the Church uses others. The Church uses words such as these:

I'm sure that the Quiz intended what was said to be understood in an entirely orthodox manner, so I have no beef there, but I don't think the use of ambiguous terminology was particularly helpful.

Much worse is this element:

Failure to believe what the Church teaches regarding the Eucharist is grave matter. Whether it is a mortal sin, however, depends on two more conditions: full knowledge and deliberate consent. We are not usually in a position to say whether these conditions obtain in another person. It would hardly be just, for example, to assume full knowledge in a person who has not been catechized or who has been badly catechized.

The charge of heresy is similarly problematic. As the Catechism teaches, "Heresy is the obstinate post-baptismal denial of some truth which must be believed with divine and catholic faith, or it is likewise an obstinate doubt concerning the same." Whether another Catholic is obstinately denying or doubting the Church's teaching is, again, something we may not be in a position to know. At least the Quiz managed to qualify this one with "possibly."


#18

And what does obstinate entail?


#19

[quote="smndtupidisaftr, post:18, topic:321814"]
And what does obstinate entail?

[/quote]

It is used in the context of incredulity, so obstinate here means the willful refusal to assent to the revealed truth; (obstinātus, past participle of obstināre to persist in, from ob- (intensive) + stin-, variant of stare to stand).2089 *Incredulity *is the neglect of revealed truth or the willful refusal to assent to it. "*Heresy *is the obstinate post-baptismal denial of some truth which must be believed with divine and catholic faith, or it is likewise an obstinate doubt concerning the same; *apostasy *is the total repudiation of the Christian faith; *schism *is the refusal of submission to the Roman Pontiff or of communion with the members of the Church subject to him."11
Assent is acceptance.


#20

I agree with others about the parts that were misleading, and will go on record that I believe I found a couple pictures and the question on transubstantiation to be offensive. I just think that could have been done better.


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