Are YOU more Catholic?


#1

This sounds real stupid but is it true that if you were brought up Catholic, baptized into the Catholic Church you’re more Catholic and more “valid” in the CC then a Protestant who is baptized in a Protestant church then converts to Catholicism?

In other words, is your “idenity” more likely Catholic if you were brought up in the Faith? Why? 'Cause I was not brought up in a certain sect except knowing that there was a God, etc. and we rarely went to church.

I was baptized in a Presbyterian church at age 18 so does that make my identity Presbyterian? Then when I converted to Catholicism, am I still a Presbyterian-Catholic so to speak?

Ooohh!!! You cradle Catholics are SO DANG LUCKY to have been baptized into the REAL Catholic Catholic Church!!! :smiley:


#2

[quote=Paris Blues]This sounds real stupid but is it true that if you were brought up Catholic, baptized into the Catholic Church you’re more Catholic and more “valid” in the CC then a Protestant who is baptized in a Protestant church then converts to Catholicism?
[/quote]

No.


#3

I don’t think so particularly. The first Catholics were origonally Jewish and were converted :stuck_out_tongue:

Besides, a lot of us “craddle-Catholics” tend to be pretty bad examples of Catholics cause we were raised Catholic and don’t see the beauty of our native religion–those Protestants who convert to Catholicsm know why they’re there and they’ve CHOSEN to be there for a reason, making them a lot more fervent.

That’s my opinion at least. There are good craddle-Catholics out there too I’m sure, but converts tend to be “more” Catholic in my experience :o


#4

[quote=Paris Blues]This sounds real stupid but is it true that if you were brought up Catholic, baptized into the Catholic Church you’re more Catholic and more “valid” in the CC then a Protestant who is baptized in a Protestant church then converts to Catholicism?
[/quote]

no


#5

I was born Catholic, fell away and came back but I am no more Catholic than anyone else.

I don’t think there is any such thing except as a common phrase describing someone in certain ways.

Like this I come from a Irish\Mexican background, I am very Catholic. This is just opinion and just is a comment on the percentage of Catholics from those countries. It really makes no difference.

I see many converts who have much more love of the faith than the cradle Catholics but it does go both ways, it is more personal experience than anything else. Most converts see the beauty that some cradle Catholics growing up never notice.

Your plenty Catholic for most anticatholics to get riled up about you, so don’t worry.

God Bless
Scylla


#6

I wouldn’t think so. The “Protestant” baptism is a Trinitarian baptism, so it is the same.

Plus there is no real “more or less” when it comes to Catholic based on when you embrace the fullness of truth. One can “truly” convert on their deathbed and be just as Catholic as you or I.

It’s just human nature for us to think "It’s not fair; I had faith, carried my crosses, etc. my whole life while this other person took the easy way out. Catholic’s don’t keep score like our post counts or Join dates on this forum. There is scripture to support this, but alas I can’t recall it.

Just perservere to the end! :wink:


#7

Every member of the Catholic Church is equally Catholic whether they have been a member for 60 minutes or 60 years.


#8

I suppose that if you are raised in the faith there are some things that come easier since you’ve been exposed to it longer

On the other hand…there is nothing like the ex-smoker, the newly fit formerly fat person, the recent immigrant, or the religious convert for energy and enthusiasm

Paul and Augustine come to mind


#9

[quote=Pillar of Cloud]I don’t think so particularly. The first Catholics were origonally Jewish and were converted :stuck_out_tongue:

Besides, a lot of us “craddle-Catholics” tend to be pretty bad examples of Catholics cause we were raised Catholic and don’t see the beauty of our native religion–those Protestants who convert to Catholicsm know why they’re there and they’ve CHOSEN to be there for a reason, making them a lot more fervent.

That’s my opinion at least. There are good craddle-Catholics out there too I’m sure, but converts tend to be “more” Catholic in my experience :o
[/quote]

Agreed. I think we cradle Catholics could take a lesson from the converts. Go through RCIA and realize the greatness of our faith… again


#10

No.

There is, however, a kind of Catholic Culture that I grew up in that I share with those who went through 12 years of Catholic School starting in 1960 through 1974…that has nothing, really, to do with the Faith or with Church Teachings…it is more a cultural thing…


#11

[quote=Paris Blues]This sounds real stupid but is it true that if you were brought up Catholic, baptized into the Catholic Church you’re more Catholic and more “valid” in the CC then a Protestant who is baptized in a Protestant church then converts to Catholicism?

In other words, is your “idenity” more likely Catholic if you were brought up in the Faith? Why? 'Cause I was not brought up in a certain sect except knowing that there was a God, etc. and we rarely went to church.

I was baptized in a Presbyterian church at age 18 so does that make my identity Presbyterian? Then when I converted to Catholicism, am I still a Presbyterian-Catholic so to speak?

Ooohh!!! You cradle Catholics are SO DANG LUCKY to have been baptized into the REAL Catholic Catholic Church!!! :smiley:
[/quote]

No.

Trick


#12

I find that I am more inspired by the converts to the faith, they always seem to be lit on fire with faith. someone mentioned St Paul and St Augustin but I also have in mind some modern day converts as Scott Hahn and Michael Cumbie. And also you Paris along with others on this board.

Also what comes to mind is the parable of fthe ield workers, that only worked for a short time and got paid for the same amount as those who worked all day. (I can’t remember the book or verses, I try to find them and repost)

Monica


#13

Yes, the workers in the field are a fine example of “Equal Catholicity”! I wish the typical Cradle Catholic could share in the enthusiasm that converts typically have.

Think about it - I’m Catholic because my parents are Catholic. I took the easy road. I have no pressure from my family telling me what’s wrong with my religion.

You, Paris (and all converts and reverts), are Catholic because you choose to be Catholic. You’ve had to overcome prejudices, both your own and from the people you most dearly love, to join our Holy Mother Church. I admire the strength that you have!

I would love to see all Catholics attending RCIA every 5-10 years. What a benefit it would be to our faithful!

If you look at so many of our early Church Fathers, Ambrose is another one - what beautiful souls we’ve reaped! Scott Hahn (convert), Jeff Cavins (revert), and so many other authors have added such a richness to our Church.

I’m trying to encourage the converts in our parish to step up and take an active role in our church. I think they feel that they are inadequate to become leaders in our parish, due to their newness to the faith. I say bunk!

Take Care and God Bless all of our Converts!

Notworthy


#14

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