Are you saved?


#1

Why there’s always argument about faith between protestant and catholic? After all, we’re all believe the same Jesus Christ. Even there are people who love to accuse other religions, saying that others religions are wrong and only his/her religion is the right one. How are we so sure about that?

Shouldn’t we all be like Jesus? As far as I’m concerned, Jesus never accuse other religions, in fact it is Pharisees who accused Jesus. I hope none of us is modern Pharisees. Regarding about “anonymous disciples” (those that do not belong to Christianity), it is stated clearly on the Bible; Matt 25:31-46. Any comment?


#2

Here is my reply to the question, “Are you saved?” when my Protestent brother asks me.

members.cox.net/humurabi/AreYouSaved.pdf


#3

Indifferentism (relativism) is a dangerous path to tread. While we both worship the same God, that is far from the complete picture. While Protestants possess much of the Christian truth, Catholicism possesses the full truth. Would you want only half Jesus if you could have the whole Jesus? Sure, half is better than NOTHING, say, but only if half is the BEST you could possibly do.


#4

No doubt about that, but instead of talking the differences, why can’t we talk about similarities?


#5

Another reply to the question “are you saved” is "yes, about 12000 years ago when Jesus died on the cross for my sins.


#6

Similarities are good to note, but today both Protestants and Catholics pretty much KNOW the similarities. Unfortunately, because of the influence of indifferentism and other modernisms, it’s been a quick slide from, “Gee, Catholics and Protestants both worship the same God but in different ways” to, “one way is just as good as another.”

This is a much tougher time than it was 40 years ago when neither Catholic nor Protestant really knew all that much about the other’s faith. (Not that some know any more now than they did then, but the opportunity for knowledge at least is here.) Because now there isn’t the honeymoon type of period where each group learns something positive (hey, that Catholic really does read the Bible; the priests don’t lock it up! or, hey, that Protestant really doesn’t walk around shouting “halleluia” all the time), but now unless one wants to fall right into indifferentism, one has to say, “yes, but with all the similarities, I still believe that my faith is more correct” (otherwise, if we worship the same God, what does it matter what faith we profess).

And once we make that statement, one or the other of us has to be right, and the other wrong. That is just the way it is. It would be great if we could BOTH be right, but we can’t be. And we can’t pretend that we can just exist side by side, Protestants worshipping as Protestants, and Catholics as Catholics, separate but equal. In order to be one, we must BE one–one in faith. We must choose the RIGHT faith.

And to answer the original title, as a Catholic my answer is, “I have been saved through Christ by baptism, I am being saved by Christ as I journey through life, and I hope to be saved by Christ at the hour of death.”


#7

Why do you believe ‘indifferentism’ to be inherently dangerous?

And once we make that statement, one or the other of us has to be right, and the other wrong. That is just the way it is. It would be great if we could BOTH be right, but we can’t be. And we can’t pretend that we can just exist side by side, Protestants worshipping as Protestants, and Catholics as Catholics, separate but equal. In order to be one, we must BE one–one in faith. We must choose the RIGHT faith.

Buddhists and Hindus do not agree, and I doubt that you would suggest that that makes one of them right. We may not both be right if we have contradictory views, but we could both be wrong.

As for being of one faith, not all Catholics believe the same things. This makes at least some of them wrong, but it does not make them non-Catholic. Heterogeneity is not a sin.

This is, perhaps, part of the reason behind the Roman Catholic Church’s acknowledgement of the possibility of salvation outside of its own purview. God alone makes the rules.


#8

The certainty is a necessity. When one believes that following the right doctrine makes the difference between an eternity in Paradise and an eternity in Hell, no one wants to even consider the possibility that s/he might be wrong. As a result, the ‘correctness’ of one’s own position is bolstered by the ‘demonstration’ of the ‘flaws’ in another’s position. I am sure that you can see the lack of logic in this, but we are only imperfect beings, after all. Add to this a few centuries of politically-motivated atrocities committed in the name of God against this religious group or that ethnic one, and you have a cycle of retribution which is very, very hard to break.

Am I saved? I do not know, nor, to be quite frank, do I particularly care. I believe that I am far too sinful to ever deserve a place with God, but choose to believe in a God who will do what is best, whatsoever that may be. My task is to keep trying to do what is right, regardless of where that may leave me. That is, I would like to go to Heaven, but, having no means of securing that on my own, I am left only with the option of leaving it all up to God.


#9

Am I saved? NO!

Can I be saved? YES!

How? ObeyJesus. Follow Jesus. Act as Jesus told us to.

Just read the Bible, even with as few as 66 edited books in it the post 1800’s Protestant Bible still proves faith alone is dead! Now when they take out James and some other books that may change things?


#10

Just read the Bible, even with as few as 66 edited books in it the post 1800’s Protestant Bible still proves faith alone is dead! Now when they take out James and some other books that may change things?

with the way the battle rages in our midst, for some reason I don’t doubt that possibility might exist. The ultimate arguement is that the RCC is wrong and Luther was 100% right with respect to the Canon.:eek: That would be the ultimate Apostasy…doing away with some books of the New Testament.:mad:


#11

I’m working out my out my salvation as Paul said with fear and trembling Phil 2:12 so yes Iam being saved.


#12

This is an interesting article on the subject of indifferentism. Let me know what you think.

72.14.209.104/search?q=cache:dqeO9qgeK8cJ:learnv.ycdsb.edu.on.ca/lt/FMMC/hpteacher.nsf/Files/mcmanad/%24FILE/relindif.html+indifferentism&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=10

Religious Indifferentism
D. McManaman

Religious Indifferentism, the belief that all religions are on an equal footing and are simply different ways to the one God, is really a heretical position that has never, throughout the history of Christianity, been seriously entertained either by the Catholic Church or mainline Protestantism. In fact, ultimately it is a kind of relativism in disguise. Nonetheless, there is something very appealing about this heresy, and I believe its appeal lies in the fact that it tends to gloss over the difficult reality of the fallen human condition. As such, it is a kind of “good news”. In other words, if Religious Indifferentism is true, then man is not lost. He can save himself.

Indeed, this news sounds good, but it is true? If it is, it renders the good news of the gospel completely redundant. Moreover, it actually refutes itself; for Indifferentism is the belief that all religions are equally legitimate attempts to explain the truth about God. Such a claim, however, completely undercuts the claims of Christ and the fundamental beliefs of Christianity. At best, then, all religions except Christianity are legitimate attempts to explain the truth about God. Let me explain.

Indifferentists often employ the metaphor of the wheel. Just as the spokes on a wheel all lead to and converge upon the hub in the center, so too all religions are regarded as various and diverse ways that lead to the one God at the center of existence.

This is a very positive and reassuring image. If it is accurate, it is difficult to understand why the vast majority of people would not, in the end, find their way back to the center. But this is a very subtle denial of the most fundamental doctrine of Christianity, namely Original Sin. We believe that the human race is fallen, broken by sin, over its head in a debt that it cannot hope to repay. In short, man cannot save himself. Recall when Jesus said to his disciples that it is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God. They said in reply: “In that case, who can be saved?” Jesus gazed at them and said, “For man it is impossible, but not for God: because for God everything is possible” (Mk 10, 26-27). And so a more accurate illustration of the human condition by means of the metaphor of the wheel might be the following:

Man has been cut off from the source of divine grace through sin. It is simply not within any man’s power to rise above his inclination to sin and make satisfaction for himself or anyone for the infinite gravity of his own sin against God. That is why man needs a saviour. The faith of Christians is that God the Son, the Second Person of the Trinity, joined a human nature, dwelt among us, suffered and died to reconcile the world to God. And so the wheel should look more like the following:

It is now possible for anyone on the rim of the wheel to make it to the center, but he or she can only do so by the wood of the cross. This does not mean, as Fundamentalists tend to believe, that only professed Christians will be saved. Far from it. But it does mean that if anyone makes it to heaven, be it a Christian, Muslim, Hindu or Jew, he or she does so only because two thousand years ago, the “Word made flesh” died for us all on Good Friday and he or she cooperated with the grace that Christ made available by virtue of his death. In short, if we made it, we made it through Christ: “I am the Way; I am Truth and Life. No one can come to the Father except through me” (Jn 14, 6).

Religious Indifferentism is insidious in that it subtly denies a fundamental truth about sin, namely, that the gravity of sin against a God of infinite dignity is nothing less than infinite. It is a denial of Original Sin and its radical wounds that have infected human nature. And it denies that the world needs a redeemer who is both fully God and fully man, who as God can cancel a debt of infinite gravity, and who as man can offer a sacrifice on our behalf. Religious Indifferentism is simply another example of how something that looks and feels good on the surface is, underneath the appearance, dangerously deceptive.


#13

I was received in the Catholic Church April 10, 2004, after over 40 years of involvement in evangelical Protestant churches.

Our RCIA teacher taught us a great response when people ask, “Are you saved?”

Answer “Yes, by the grace of God.”

It’s doctrinally correct (CCC) and very, very Catholic! It also makes Protestants gape, which is kind of fun!


#14

We rightly hope for the grace of final perseverance in working out our salvation in fear and trembling-----but will not know we are saved until the time of our death.

CCC.

1949 Called to beatitude but wounded by sin, man stands in need of salvation from God. Divine help comes to him in Christ through the law that guides him and the grace that sustains him:

Work out your salvation with fear and trembling; for God is at work in you, both to will and to work for his good pleasure.1

2016 The children of our holy mother the Church rightly hope for the grace of final perseverance and the recompense of God their Father for the good works accomplished with his grace in communion with Jesus.70 Keeping the same rule of life, believers share the “blessed hope” of those whom the devine mercy gathers into the “holy city, the new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband”.71


#15

Hello All,

When I am asked, “Are you saved”, I turn around and ask, “What must I do to share in everlasting life?” After they give me their answer, I say, “No! What is the best answer to this question? What is Jesus’ answer to this question?”

Usually those who ask the question “Are you Saved” do not accept Jesus’ teaching "If you wish to enter into life, keep the commandments."

Jesus, What Must I Do To Share In Everlasting Life?
NAB MAR 10:17

As he was setting out on a journey a man came running up, knelt down before him and asked, "Good Teacher, what must I do to share in everlasting life?" Jesus answered, “Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone. You know the commandments:
**‘You shall not kill;
You shall not commit adultery;
You shall not steal;
You shall not bear false witness;
You shall not defraud;
Honor your father and your mother.’”**NAB MAT 19:16

“Teacher, what good must I do to possess everlasting life?” He answered, “Why do you question me about what is good? There is One who is good. If you wish to enter into life, keep the commandments." “Which ones?” he asked. Jesus replied “You shall not kill”; ‘You shall not commit adultery’; ‘You shall not steal’; ‘You shall not bear false witness’; ‘Honor your father and mother’; and ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’”

NAB LUK 10:25

On one occasion a lawyer stood up to pose him this problem: “Teacher, what must I do to inherit everlasting life?” Jesus answered him: "What is written in the law? How do you read it?" He replied:
"You shall love the Lord your God
with all your heart,
with all your soul,
with all your strength,
and with all your mind;
and your neighbor as yourself."

Jesus said, "You have answered correctly. Do this and you shall live."
NIV 1JO 5:3

This is love for God: to obey his commands. And his commands are not burdensome.NIV JOH 14:15

"If you love me, you will obey what I command."
NAB JOH 15:9

“As the Father has loved me, so I have loved you. Live on in my love. You will live in my love if you keep my commandments, even as I have kept my Father’s commandments, and live in his love.” **NAB JOH 12:47 **

"If anyone hears my words and does not keep them, I am not the one to condemn him, for I did not come to condemn the world but to save it. Whoever rejects me and does not accept my words already has his judge, namely, the word I have spoken - it is that which will condemn him on the last day. For I have not spoken on my own; no, the Father who sent me has commanded me what to say and how to speak. Since I know that his commandment means eternal life, whatever I say is spoken just as he instructed me."


#16

**

Jesus, What Must I Do To Share In Everlasting Life?
NAB MAR 10:17

As he was setting out on a journey a man came running up, knelt down before him and asked, "Good Teacher, what must I do to share in everlasting life?" Jesus answered, “Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone. You know the commandments:
**‘You shall not kill;
You shall not commit adultery;
You shall not steal;
You shall not bear false witness;
You shall not defraud;
Honor your father and your mother.’”**NAB MAT 19:16

“Teacher, what good must I do to possess everlasting life?” He answered, “Why do you question me about what is good? There is One who is good. If you wish to enter into life, keep the commandments." “Which ones?” he asked. Jesus replied “You shall not kill”; ‘You shall not commit adultery’; ‘You shall not steal’; ‘You shall not bear false witness’; ‘Honor your father and mother’; and ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’”

NAB LUK 10:25

On one occasion a lawyer stood up to pose him this problem: “Teacher, what must I do to inherit everlasting life?” Jesus answered him: "What is written in the law? How do you read it?" He replied:
"You shall love the Lord your God
with all your heart,
with all your soul,
with all your strength,
and with all your mind;
and your neighbor as yourself."

Jesus said, "You have answered correctly. Do this and you shall live."
NIV 1JO 5:3

This is love for God: to obey his commands. And his commands are not burdensome.NIV JOH 14:15

"If you love me, you will obey what I command."
NAB JOH 15:9

“As the Father has loved me, so I have loved you. Live on in my love. You will live in my love if you keep my commandments, even as I have kept my Father’s commandments, and live in his love.” **NAB JOH 12:47 **

"If anyone hears my words and does not keep them, I am not the one to condemn him, for I did not come to condemn the world but to save it. Whoever rejects me and does not accept my words already has his judge, namely, the word I have spoken - it is that which will condemn him on the last day. For I have not spoken on my own; no, the Father who sent me has commanded me what to say and how to speak. Since I know that his commandment means eternal life, whatever I say is spoken just as he instructed me."

I concur, as commandment keeping is essential to Faith, so if we omit commandment keeping, then according to Christ and the gospels one can fall from grace. One with Faith keeps Gods commandments.

Angeljan…**


#17

If you love me, you will obey what I command."


#18

Amen! I am redeemed. My salvation I work out with fear and trembling…a perfectly acceptable Catholic response to the question.


#19

I heard a really excellent answer to this on a tape - ages ago, so don’t shoot me down if I get it slightly wrong.

“I am saved by water and the Holy Spirit, by a free gift of God’s grace, and, like the apostle Paul, I’m working out my out my salvation with fear and with trembling.”


#20

To be saved is a lifetime journey not a one time acceptance. No one can know for sure if they are saved. That is why we work out our salvation with fear and trembling, as other poster have said. Matthew 25: 45-46 says "…Amen , I say to you, what you did not do for one of these least ones, you did not do for me.’ And these will go off to eternal punishment, but the rightous to eternal life."
So if we are already saved, as a lot of people think, why would he (Jesus) tell us that?

I agree with brotherhrolf.:thumbsup:


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