Are you watching, Vlad? US and British soldiers step up their joint training exercises with the Georgian army - on Putin's doorstep


#1

Read more: dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3590739/American-tanks-Putin-s-backyard-soldiers-continue-two-weeks-joint-military-drills-Georgian-army-angering-Russia.html#ixzz48j1toz6d

**Are you watching, Vlad? US and British soldiers step up their joint training exercises with the Georgian army - on Putin’s doorstep

Servicemen from both Georgia and the United States continued joint training exercises in Georgia on Saturday, photos have revealed.

They were seen with AT4s and a SPG-9 anti-armour weapon outside Tblisi.
Earlier this week, the Georgian army began twoweeks of military exercises with the United States and Britain on Wednesday - despite Russia’s anger as American tanks rolled into its backyard. **

Hundreds of soldiers gathered at the military base of Vaziani - once used by Russia, just outside the capital Tbilisi - for the opening ceremony of the exercise, dubbed ‘Noble Partner 2016’.

As the sky filled with paratroopers while some 650 American, 150 British and 500 Georgian soldiers watched on in front of a fleet of tanks, Moscow’s anger was almost palpable.

Last week, it said the decision to hold the exercise on its doorstep was ‘provocative’ and ‘aimed at deliberately rocking the military-political situation in the South Caucasus’.

The Russian Foreign Ministry went as far as to accuse the United States - which has also dispatched an entire mechanised company, including eight Bradley infantry fighting vehicles and, for the first time, eight M1A2 Abrams main battle tanks - of indulging the ‘revanchist desires of Tbilisi’.

It is a charge which Georgia has strongly denied.


#2

These exercises are to prepare for a possible Russian attack on Georgia. They are quite provocative towards Russia. They should just leave Russia alone since Russia is on the right side of history.


#3

I’m sure he’s watching… that’s why the Su-34s are buzzing US ships and Backfire bombers are causing Typhoons to scramble over various NATO coastlines every other day!

He sees and he seems determined to prove he is not intimidated. It’s a vary dark game of chicken, worst it’s been since 1980s, in my opinion.

And remember, at that time, things got worse (Korean Air Lines 007, evil empire speech) before they got better. We only found out a few years ago that the world came closer to a nuclear war in 1983 than the public ever imagined at the time.

**Pray for cool heads and honest discussions.
**


#4

You mean, after the bolsheviks, after Lenin, after Stalin, after the Gulags, after Khrushchev, after exporting communism, after electing a former KGB director as president, NOW they’re on the right side of history?


#5

:thumbsup:

“But he’s not a socialist!”

“But he’s better than Obama / Hillary / Donald Trump!”

“But he said he stands up for Christian values!”

“But…but he doesn’t like gay marriage!”

It’s amazing how many people, who are not Russian citizens, drink the Putin Kool-Aid. The man is certainly not a monster along the lines of Josef Stalin, but he is not the saviour of Christian civilization. I’ve been seeing this trend for the past two years, and sadly, it’s likely to grow worse. Perhaps next they can form a fan club for Narendra Modi. :stuck_out_tongue:


#6

Well, Garry Kasparov is not enamored of Putin. But Garry now lives in the U.S., presumably for his own safety.


#7

I’m actually a fan of Garry. Nice to hear about what he’s up to these days. :slight_smile:


#8

Are we talking about the CCCP or Russia, Stalin was Georgian amusingly enough it should be noted of course…


#9

He is a ‘tough guy’ leader of the kind Russians respect, they dislike people like Obama who is percieved as bookish there. Also Putin came to power after Yeltsin who was loathed (and I am been polite there) by many Russians, my wife once commented that if she saw Yeltsin burning to death her first thought would be ask where to get some more petrol to throw on the fire, given that she would stop for nearly anyone and aid them I was stunned by that but she detests the man and would regards him as a a traitor to the country.


#10

Salutations
My son, his wife, my 3 beautiful grand babies and other family members of his wife’s, live 45 min from Tblisi. I didn’t see the news yesterday.
We had to evacuate them, the last time Russians invaded. Only 1 baby, then.
I don’t know what history you got but Georgia has existed for centuries. They’ve been making their own wine for 4000yrs B.C. They have their own language and alphabet. They are disagreeing over 2 parcels of land (spelling) Acetia and Ochazia. Or Osetia and Achazia. Rome invaded them. Tamerain. invaded them. Various attack from Muslims. There is a bridge out of Tblisi on the way to Mtsketa, where 100,000 Orthodox Catholics were martyred for Christ.
It was the convert or die thing.
Those 2 pieces of land have a lot of Russians living there. They moved there on Georgian land. So, Russia always like seaports, that drives them. Now, Russia has Crimea with seaports. They only want them because of the ratio of Russians to Georgians.
The Russians go across their border and attack Georgian citizens.
The last invasion, quite a few Russian soldiers went AWOL. They stayed behind in the villages giving their guns away for food. I’ll work for food.
“Ooh Palma diglossious.” God bless you in Khartuli.
in Christ’s love
Tweedlealice :frowning:


#11

I have no issue with Russians respecting him. They’re right to do so. Heck, if I was a Russian, I probably would too! Heaven knows his “masculine” (for want of a better adjective) approach is a breath of fresh air today. (Perhaps Donald Trump appeals to people for a similar reason? :slight_smile: And heaven knows I’m no great fan of Obama, even if I don’t think he’s the Caligula that some of us paint him as. :stuck_out_tongue:

My issue was more with a certain segment of Internet Catholics (I call them the “Fatima Rapture” crowd, for self-explanatory reasons), who seem to think Putin is the fulfillment of their private prophecies and interpretations, and/or the Righteous Catholic Monarch. They will be very, very disappointed. :rolleyes:


#12

I actually think as a person Obama would be an ok person but that he is not a great national leader for numerous reasons. I certainly don’t think he is the monster he is often painted as. Obama has always struck me as a guy who would be happier as a mid level politician or an academic but I dislike the attacks on him which become very personally and nasty just as much as I disliked those on Bush before him. I think they lower the tone of political debate. Trump is viewed in a rather tongue in cheek way in Russia and the dry sarcasm with which he is spoken of does not always travel well unfortunately as Russian humour can be very sandstorm dry in quality at times. He is perceived as more macho than Obama though for sure.


#13

How do Russians fell about Gorbachev now? And indeed how do they feel about his polar opposite, Brezhnev?


#14

Agreed. I feel Obama would have been happier as a law professor. And while I disagree a lot of his policies, there is no need to vilify the man by questioning his parentage, accusing him of having a gay lover in Pakistan, lynching his effigy and so on. :frowning:


#15

Gorbachev is still generally regarded with some respect but Yeltsin is felt to be an incompetent drunk who more or less sold his country out. Brezhnev would be irrelevant to a lot of younger Russians but many older Russians would see him as neither particularly bad or good.


#16

Interesting.

Gorbachev was the last Russian leader, albeit of the former Soviet Union, to have a considerable fan-base in the West. I wondered whether Russians today view his doomed attempt to keep the Union together in response to Yeltsin’s campaign on behalf of the nation states as a negative or a positive.

Yeltsin essentially sounded the death knell for Russia - through the USSR - as a global superpower. While it’s economy was in sharp decline in the '80s, it was still a country armed to the teeth, a military superpower - almost to the last moment.

But Yeltsin really did it in with his presidency of the Russian Federation.


#17

Yeltsin was a clown, I remember when he turned up in Ireland and couldn’t get of the plane, the excuse was that,“he was feeling unwell”, but people felt it was more likely he was drunk.


#18

I have to wonder about this a little, notwithstanding that I don’t pretend to be a globalist expert.

Yeltsin, to my understanding, did not impoverish the Soviet Union. It was already impoverished. He tried to distribute the assets the state had appropriated, but it didn’t work out. Possibly his own corruption led to the concentration of wealth in the hands of robber barons, but possibly the lack of any kind of reasonable laws and enforcement mechanisms were the real cause. Russia was a long way from having the intricate balances that have existed for so long in the west (and were painfully won).

Russia could have been the most important political and economic power in Europe even so, albeit gradually. But a KGB cadre took over from Yeltsin and notwithstanding significant economic improvement, Russia is a political pariah because of Putin’s revanchist ambitions. Russia can be an important and respected European state or the despised erstwhile builder of a new empire in Europe, but not both.


#19

Russia rejected communism. Putin is a conservative Christian who is trying to save Christian civilization. The United States and the United Kingdom are now liberal nations. They are influenced by the New World Order. Russia is fighting the New World Order.


#20

This is a rather er interesting view of Russia, while I feel Russia gets used as a scapegoat even I’d feel this goes way too far in the other direction.


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