Article on the Revised Translation

Please give me your opinion. I would ask that you withhold it until the entire piece has been placed in its entirety:

When Pope Benedict XVI travels to the United Kingdom to beatify the Venerable John Cardinal Newman in mid September, he will not only be raising a new blessed to the altars of the Church, but, he will also introduce a change that will affect English-speaking Catholics the world over: a revised translation of the prayers of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

These changes have been long in coming, having begun back in 2001 when the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments (the Catholic Church’s curial department that oversees the Liturgy) implemented a document called Liturgiam Authenticam (Authentic Liturgy), which sets the guidelines for new translations in the various languages of the faithful. In our case, these revised translations were made by the International Commission on the English Language (ICEL), composed of bishops from the various English-speaking countries, under the guidance of Vox Clara, another English-language subgroup headed by Australia’s George Cardinal Pell.

Before we look at the actual changes, a little history lesson is in order. Up until about 1964, the Church celebrated the Mass in Latin. The readings and the homily were in the vernacular, that is to say, the language of the people, but the rest of the prayers were in the Church’s official language, Latin. But, from 1964 on, the Church began a gradual shift towards celebrating the Mass in the vernacular by translating the 1962 Missal of Blessed Pope John XXIII.

In the wake of the Second Vatican Council, Pope Paul VI ordered a new Roman Missal (the official Mass prayer book) to be published both in Latin and in the vernacular. This version of the Mass came into being in Advent 1969. However, while the different language groups retained much of the original Latin version, the original ICEL used a French document that called for “dynamic equivalence”, meaning that translators would attempt to keep the essence of the Latin original, but, not use a literal word-for-word translation. For example, in Spanish, the celebrant greets the faithful with these words: “El Señor este con vostros.” The faithful respond, “Y con tu espíritu.” In the current translation, the celebrant says “The Lord be with you”. The faithful respond, “And also with you.”

Part II is next.

Part II:

And, so it has been for the last 40+ years. In 2000, the Servant of God Pope John Paul II released a third typical edition of the Roman Missal. When ICEL translated the new book, it was submitted to the CDWDS for the necessary recognitio, (Latin for “approval”). However, the CDWDS denied the recognitio, abolished ICEL and ordered its reconfiguration in addition to the creation of the Vox Clara committee. Under John Paul’s direction, the CDWDS also implemented Liturgiam Authenticam. “Dynamic equivalence” then gave way to a revised, literal word-for-word translation of the Roman Missal for English-speaking Catholics.

The key word in all of this is “revised”. The format of the Mass does not change. The Liturgy of the Word and the Liturgy of the Eucharist remain the same. The big shift comes in the language the celebrant and the faithful pray the Mass. When the celebrant greets the faithful with “The Lord be with you”, the faithful, in turn, will respond with “And with your spirit”, a little translation of the Latin “Et cum Spiritu tuo”, which the Spanish-language version retains. In fact, a lot of what we will be praying in English pretty much sounds like what many of us have been reciting in Spanish.

Another change that will sound very familiar to those who assist at Spanish-language Masses will be the prayer the faithful recite before Holy Communion. Currently, in English, the prayer reads: “Lord, I am not worthy to receive you, but, only say the word and I shall be healed.” The revised translation reads: “Lord, I am not worthy that you should come under my roof, but, only say the word and my soul shall be healed.” Not only does this prayer match the Latin word-for-word, but, it also matches the Gospel account of the Roman centurion’s plea to Jesus that he is unworthy to have the Lord come under his roof, but only a word of healing is sufficient enough.

A big change affects, the Memorial Acclamations that are sung after the priest chants, “The mystery of faith”. Gone are the familiar “Christ has died; Christ has died; Christ will come again” and “Dying, you restored our death. Rising, you restored our life. Lord Jesus, come in glory.” The “Christ has died” acclamation is somewhat of an anomaly because it does not appear in the original Latin text. In fact, it does not show up in any other vernacular version of the Roman Missal except the English one. Neither does “Dying you destroyed our death”. Instead, the acclamations return to the original three options: “When we eat this bread and drink this cup, we proclaim your death, O Lord, until come again;” “We proclaim your Death, O Lord, and profess your Resurrection until you come again;” and “Save us, Savior of the world, for by your Cross and Resurrection you have set us free.”

Part III is forthcoming.

Part III:

Other changes include the Confiteor (I confess), which restores the triple “through my fault, my fault, my most grievous fault” that in Spanish reads “por mi culpa, por mi culpa, por mi gran culpa.” The Gloria and the Credo (Creed) and the Sanctus (Holy, Holy, Holy) also have major revisions. In the Credo, instead of praying “We believe”, we will recite “I believe.” But, that is not the only significant change in the text of the Creed. The language will now more accurately reflect the essence of the Church’s faith by using words such as “incarnate” and “consubstantial” (which means “one with the First Person of the Trinity, in the unique, singular identity of God”, as author Russell Shaw explains it).

These revisions and restorations, the Church tells us, are important. What we pray is as important as how we pray. “Lex orandi, lex credandi” means the law of prayer is the law of belief. As Benedict told the Vox Clara committee, “I welcome the news that the English translation of the Roman Missal will soon be ready for publication, so that the texts you have worked so hard to prepare may be proclaimed in the liturgy that is celebrated across the anglophone world. Through these sacred texts and the actions that accompany them, Christ will be made present and active in the midst of his people.”

The current translation of the Roman Missal expires on the First Sunday of Advent, November 27, 2011. By then, the revised translations should be in place. For those interested in seeing the entire text of the Order of the Mass, log on to the USCCB Roman Missal formation website at usccb.org/romanmissal/. In addition, author Jeffrey Pinyan has written an excellent book, “Praying the Mass”, which not only offers a look at the revised translations in greater detail, but, it also serves as an excellent primer for the Liturgy.
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Please let me know what you think.

Personally, I love it

I think it’s a great improvement.
It is a lot closer to what we say in the EF.
Thanks for sharing that with us. :):slight_smile:

Benedictgal, is this something you or somebody you know wrote? I’m wondering what the context is for this article.

I think it’s very well stated. But I wish it had included the fact that at least some nations had some very fine literal English translations in 1964 but those were rejected in favor of an all new dynamic equivalent translation.

Thanks to all for the feedback. I am writing this article for the local secular newspaper and am trying to pack in as much as possible. My spiritual director told me to try and keep this as positive as I can.

I’m not so sure I’m sold on this whole ‘literal translation’ thing.

Why not?

The words we use are just as important as how we use them. At Mass, we are engaging in something that it out of the ordinary. We need to use sacred language because we are engaging in a sacred act.

:thumbsup::thumbsup:

As an Anglican that’s what I loved about their service. The language was not simply ‘everyday’ language.
Whenever I can I go to a Latin Mass. Once again we no longer use our everyday (or ‘profane’*) language.
Mass is not an ordinary, everyday thing. It is sacred and holy. Our language (and our dress, for that matter) should also be special.

  • I use the word “profane” here simply as referring to anything which is not sacred. 30-odd years ago I had to read “The Sacred and the Profane” for one of my religion courses at Carleton U.

Check out the facts if the Holy Father is truly using the new translations. This is a copy of the mass that he will be celebrating. Looks like it is the present translation.
vatican.va/news_services/liturgy/libretti/2010/messale_regnounito2010.pdf

Iagree that it is not strictly a literal or as Benedictgal calls a “word for word” translation, for in many instances it is not word for word. What we have in the revised texts is called “formal equivalance” as opposed to the “dynamic equivilance” that was called for in Comme le prevoit. Other than that and the opening paragraph that states the pope will be using the new translation, the article is pretty good for use in the secular media.

Pope Benedict thank you!

I did and the strange part is that the official UK Papal visit website lists this appears:

thepapalvisit.org.uk/2010-Visit/Papal-Liturgies-Magnificat

On page 112, the new Gloria will make its debut at the Papal Mass in Scotland. The same holds true for the Sanctus and the Memorial Acclamation. There are significant parts in Latin. I may just order one of the booklets online as a keepsake.

It looks like only a small number of sung parts will be introduced. I do remember reading something about the Gloria. perhaps it is just a new mass setting using the revised translation, the rest will be the 73 version. But al lot of the mass will be in Latin anyway.

I scrolled through all 480+ pages and what will be used are the new settings for the:

Gloria
Sanctus
Memorial Acclamation
Agnus Dei (even though this has not changed)

From what I could hear of it, the new settings sound really good.

And if I might ad this:

chiesa.espresso.repubblica.it/articolo/1344719?eng=y

Thank you Benedictgal for this thread. Please continue to Pray for our Holy Father Benedict XI as he continues to restore our Church!

And thank-you for that post dmorgan!!
I enjoyed reading that link.
Especially:

Kneeling for communion is one of the innovations that pope Joseph Ratzinger has introduced when he celebrates the Eucharist.

But rather than an innovation, this is a return to tradition. The others are placing the crucifix at the center of the altar, “so that at the Mass we are all looking at Christ, and not at each other,” and the frequent use of Latin “to emphasize the universality of the faith and the continuity of the Church.”

But among the standard-setting practices of Benedict XVI, the one least understood – so far – is perhaps that of having the faithful kneel for communion.

But all this about church flooring got me wondering about my local parish.
It now has carpeting on top of the old boring tiles.
The first time I ever entered the church I was amazed for a good 10 minutes at all the ornate decoration inside. I’ve heard that some people left in the 60’s because much of the artwork was removed and sent elsewhere.
Now I’m wondering what the original flooring was like …

Thank you for the feedback. I have made some revisions to the article and have sent it off. I am hoping that it will be printed soon.

Here is the article as revised:

Pope slowly lifts the veil on the revised English Mass parts
When Pope Benedict XVI travels to the United Kingdom to beatify the Venerable John Cardinal Newman in mid September, he will not only be raising a new blessed to the altars of the Church, but he will also partially roll out a change that will affect English-speaking Catholics the world over: a revised translation of the prayers of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

These changes have been long in coming, having begun back in 2001 when the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments (the Catholic Church’s curial department that oversees the Liturgy) published a document called Liturgiam Authenticam (Authentic Liturgy), which sets the guidelines for new translations in the various languages of the faithful. In our case, these revised translations were made by the International Commission on the English Language (ICEL), composed of bishops from the various English-speaking countries, under the guidance of Vox Clara, another English-language subgroup headed by Australia’s George Cardinal Pell.

Before we look at the actual changes, a little history lesson is in order. Up until about 1964, the Church celebrated the Mass in Latin. The readings and the homily were in the vernacular, that is to say, the language of the people, but the rest of the prayers were in the Church’s official language, Latin. But, from 1964 on, the Church began a gradual shift towards celebrating the Mass in the vernacular by translating the 1962 Missal of Blessed Pope John XXIII.

In the wake of the Second Vatican Council, Pope Paul VI ordered a new Roman Missal (the official Mass prayer book) to be published both in Latin and in the vernacular. This version of the Mass came into being in Advent 1969. However, while the different language groups retained much of the original Latin version, the original ICEL used a French document that called for “dynamic equivalence”, meaning that translators would attempt to keep the essence of the Latin original, but, not use a literal word-for-word translation. For example, in Spanish, the celebrant greets the faithful with these words: “El Señor este con vostros.” The faithful respond, “Y con tu espíritu.” In the current English translation, the celebrant says “The Lord be with you”. The faithful respond, “And also with you.”

And, so it has been for the last 40+ years. However, back in 2000, the Servant of God Pope John Paul II released a third typical edition of the Roman Missal. When ICEL translated the new book, it was submitted to the CDWDS for the necessary recognitio, (approval). However, the CDWDS denied the recognitio, restructured ICEL and ordered the creation of the Vox Clara committee. Under John Paul’s direction, the CDWDS also implemented Liturgiam Authenticam. “Dynamic equivalence” then gave way to a revised, formal translation of the Roman Missal for English-speaking Catholics.

The key word in all of this is “revised”. The format of the Mass does not change. The Liturgy of the Word and the Liturgy of the Eucharist remain the same. The big shift comes in the language the celebrant and the faithful pray the Mass. When the celebrant greets the faithful with “The Lord be with you”, the faithful, in turn, will respond with “And with your spirit”, a little translation of the Latin “Et cum Spiritu tuo”, which the Spanish-language version retains. In fact, a lot of what we will be praying in English pretty much sounds like what many of us have been reciting in Spanish.

Part II is forthcoming.

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