Ask me anything: Episcopalian Edition


#41

I believe that truth is found in all Christian Churches. I was brought up in the Episcopal Church, so there I am. FYI: I do not hold, as some of my fellow parishioners do, that the Bishop of Rome is “just some other man.”


#42

I would like to remain on topic but this should be addressed.

The Didache condemned abortion and that goes back to the 1st century. To call it murder or not is a game of semantics. We know from science new life begins at conception. As for the passage you alluded to:

I’m not Catholic. Far from it. But that viewpoint is correct and stands up to scrutiny.


#43

Interesting. I believe the fullness of truth is found in the RCC, it is not interchangable. There are elements of the truth to be found in almost all worship, however, and so should be respected.

Also, was not Episcopalian 2004 the poster who put out the invitation?


#44

What is presented here as “so that her children come out” is translated in other bibles simply as “suffers a miscarriage.” And what is presented here as “if there is harm” is alternately translated as “if the woman dies.”
In my opinion the anti-abortion folks have fudged the translation.

That being said, not practicing abortion is an ancient Christian tradition which members of that Church should continue to respect. I don’t see the need to force that tradition unto others through the use of secular law. I don’t believe that early Christians did that.

In my mind the most important question is this: “Is voluntary pregnancy termination offensive to our Creator?” Remember that He gave Moses over 600 laws and many of these address human reproduction. None of these laws address voluntary abortion or define that act as murder.


#45

Abortion isn’t confined to religion any more than murder or theft is.


#46

In Judaism a diseased fetus which threatens the life of its carrier is regarded as a “gollum” and the woman is legally entitled to defend herself against it, using deadly force if necessary.


#47

That’s not where I was going with the statement.


#48

Again, I hate to go off-topic again.

Nope. The interlinear for the Ancient Hebrew shows premature birth not miscarriage.

Modern liberal democracies allow people to put forth their ideas. Early Christians didn’t live under anything like that. Luther’s two kingdoms view offers insight into this.

Absence isn’t licence. Even literalists/fundamentalists agree with this.


#49

True. Back in the early Roe v Wade days, I recall a friend who was considering forming an Atheists For Life group.


#50

Not the OP, but I was raised Episcopalian and never heard of the 39 Articles until I was 26 and in the ACNA.


#51

Not raised Episcopalian, but after the catechism classes, as history, never heard of them again, within my jurisdiction. Certainly not within the parish.


#52

The fact of the matter is that the Articles are quite Reformed in a number of ways, and a great many Anglicans are not Reformed. If I’m not mistaken, the clergy are required to accept the Articles in their entirety, but many simply don’t, and the laity are not obligated to accept them in their entirety. Which is good, because I believe in seven sacraments, disagree with sola fide, and have some other issues with them.

On that note, btw, Article XXV contradicts itself. It says that the five sacraments besides baptism and the Eucharist are not sacraments because they lack an associated physical sign. Which…they definitely have. Unction has anointing with oil and holy orders have the laying on of hands, both of which are mentioned in the Bible. Marriage has the marital act, obviously. Confirmation isn’t mentioned in the Bible but involves the laying on of hands. What about confession? Never had auricular confession so I can’t speak to it. But yeah, by the internal logic of the Article which rejects five of the sacraments, at least four could still be sacraments.


#53

Back later with response.


#54

Yes, the pope is the Primate of All Italy. Where I live (the UK) the Archbishop of Armagh (in Northern Ireland, UK) is the Primate of All Ireland. I know that France and Spain have primates but the number of primates is small.


#55

It’s a good thing the Westminster Standards weren’t adopted then! At least for you and many Anglicans. I happen to like the Standards. They’re very helpful for those of us leaning towards the Reformed tradition.


#56

If the Anglican Church formally adopted full-blown Calvinism, I’d be at my local Catholic Church faster than you could say “tulip.”


#57

Personally, I do not agree with abortion (especially that new law in NY), but the other things are perfectly fine.

Contraception: Its not a life yet, unlike a fetus, so what is the problem with it? You aren’t killing anything just preventing something from being conceived.

Pre-marital Sex: who cares? I don’t think God does. It happens all the time and those people aren’t devil worshippers. Everyone sins and there are much worse sins.

Same sex: I’m neutral

Note: not all Episcopalians are the same. Be careful


#58

Not much. People overplay the differences a lot. One thing is the mass is much smaller and simple which I like.


#59

Nothing big. I think Cath/Epi are almost the same communion but different style.


#60

Yes. My mother was a Lutheran and I was baptized at Lutheran church


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.