Asked my husband to leave the house


#1

We have been going to counseling for about 6-8 weeks. Before that, he had withdrawn almost completely from me, to the point that we had not slept in the same room or had sex in over 12 months. I knew this was not normal but when I would bring it up, he had logical work-related reasons for using the spare bedroom, and could not give any other reason for our low intimacy except “I’m tired and not thiking about it because I’m so busy”.

Also important to the situation is a female “friend” that I don’t approve of, recently divorced, whose ex-hubby believes they were having an affair or some sort. I have had the same suspicions.

I thought counseling was starting to help. We were communicating more and hugging more. But this week he began to cry and sulk for no apparent reason.

Then today I learned that the friend’s ex-hubby had asked them to stop the friendship months ago, which both the woman and my husband refused. I had thought more of my husbands ethics. Also learned that husband has been lying to me about times when I thought he was at work but he was really at friends home.

He admits to lying about his location at times, but does not admit to any physical affair. I can’t believe him after so many lies and no visable attempts at affection for so long. He claims he loves me and wants to fix things, but when we try, he barely does the minimum required.

The reason for the crying and sulking this week: he said he was trying to decide if he should stay with me or leave me and keep his friend. That should not take 2 seconds of consideration!

My parents are going on 45 years of marriage. I never thought I would be in this position. I feel like I am turning my back on the sacrament of marriage, but I’m at the end of my rope with him…I try and try and he seems to find ways to blame me for not trusting him, when he’s lying all the time!

I need prayers, mostly, but also some thoughts from brains calmer than mine right now. I’ve asked him to not sleep here until I say otherwise. I may be seeing a lawyer on Monday, I’m not sure. The priest that I think of as a mentor is 1100 miles away. My heart and brain are telling me so many things and I don’t know what to do.

c


#2

Coming from a 17-year-old, the best I can say is to offer it all up, whether for your husband or for souls in trouble, it’s at times like these when either our saintliness can grow because we’re carrying our cross like Christ, or all the imperfections we have can take hold and destroy us even more.

Jesus is always there for you, go see him in the Blessed Sacrament more often, take refuge there for longer periods of time if you can, where do you think priests acquire their wisdom? Pray the rosary everyday liek Our Lady asked us to at Fatima, and when you seem to run out of steam, don’t worry, we’re not machines, but God asks of us the best we are capable of, and if we give that to Him, we’re doing things right.

And know that if your husband is having an affair, you are in the right in God’s eyes, for that reason alone you should be consoled.
Always remember to be loving also, and humble, but to also gently stand firm.

The sweet can never be as sweet without the sour, think about it.

God bless you, and I’ll be praying for you and your husband.


#3

These things we face in our marriages, what’s thing right thing to do? What’s moral, we’re taught, turn the other cheek, forgive others etc. I’m in a very dishonest marriage.My husband & I have had seperate bedrooms 2 years now. It doesn’t evenbother him. We’ve been married 8 years & have a very stressful relationship. I believe, that when a couple marry in the church, the bond becomes Sacramenitalized. Without the Holy Spirit to guide us, our marriages can be lost, misguided & doomed to failure.
These are hard times. My husband has a prescription drug addiction which he and his family hid from me before we were married. Our marriage was a lie from the start. I didn’t know he was high on pain meds while taking our vows. I’d never seen addiction, I didn’t know what it looked like & the lies run deep they’re constant, everyday and haunting. I seek peace knowing I’ve done my best with good intentions. I know prayers are always heard & answered. We may never see the answers because God works in His way, His time, but remain in FAITH knowing God loves you & your husband, much more than you could love eachother. I never know where my husband is, who he’s with, where he’s been, he’s gone 10-12 hours at a time. I know my husband is dialoyal, I know he’s corrupt & his thinking is faulty & flawed. He’s lost all notion of honesty, integrity, self control. After all our years & the pain ,his decisions, what it’s caused he- continues, everyday, being sorry everyday, but still he lies. Being sorry is empty if doesn’t leed to conversion with the intention to sin no more. He justifies the use of pain meds & having a legal perscription for pot. He uses these drugs because he LOVES them & how good it feels. He gets away it because it’s LEGAL, his doctor says it’s ok. Society believes “If it Legal - It’s Moral”. It’s difficult & unpopular to take a firm stand on TRUTH. When it becomes an issue of morality, the difference between right and wrong, it’s difficult maybe impossible to start meaningful healing unless both people stand on solid ground. If you & your husband have fundamental differences in what you believe to be right & wrong. If you don’t share in the same value system- your problems will be many. There can’t be a marriage until BOTH parties set their “self” aside- look to the marriage with honor & ask-what can I do to bring forth goodness & love? I believe the most important thing is to put the SELF aside, what can I do to nurture the marriage with the help of the Holy Spirit? If both aren’t willing to do that, there isn’t much that can be done. My advice in love is- seek help from a Catholic professional who understands the sacrament of marriage, what it means to be catholic & married. It’s important because people water-down what marriage calls us to. It’s our VOCATION & should be valued & respected as such. I realize how far I’ve fallen trying to help my husband- what I lost was myself, my confidence & connection to God. It’s a fine line for women- we take on the responsibility of keeping it together & we take on the task of trying to make things right to keep harmony in the family. The price we pay can be high, we need to be careful not to lose ourselves & fall away from God. Marriage takes 2, God must be 1st then the 2 who became one. Always, what’s best for the marriage. Both people must be loyal to the bond. Your husband shouldn’t have a relationship with another person, man or woman,IF that relationship doesn’t honor your marriage. My husbands men friends & family members leed him to temptation & are distructive to our marriage. There’s no shade of gray here, your husband shouldn’t have unappropiate relationships with others. Ask yourself, if you know him well enough to conclude, is this a problem that can be worked out? Is this behavior caused by of a lack of moral values- impulse control problem? Does he know right from wrong? It took me some time getting to know my inlaws, the dynamics of the family system-how they interact etc. Now I have a better understanding. He’s been taught to lie, and it’s not a lie when it suits an objective- the sin of ommission, half truths, what’s not said or left out. He lacks a good foundation. Being 48, he realizes the difference- he knows his thinking is flawed, but he still behaves the same. He’s done it for so long with success that he has no real incentive to change. I don’t know your age, I’m 53& if I could give you 1 thing, I would tell you: NEVER compromise your moral values & ethics for anyone. You were brave asking your husband to leave-I’m sorry for your pain. Turn him over to Saint Joseph, pray the rosary & lay your husband at the foot of the alter. Tell Jesus you need him to guide & protect you. Ask the Holy Spirit to comfort you. Please, don’t let bitterness get a foothold in your heart, do all you can to keep your heart soft, keep it soft, don’t let the evil one take your peace & rob you of your joy. I wish you well…remain blessed


#4

[quote=cecilia97]We have been going to counseling for about 6-8 weeks. Before that, he had withdrawn almost completely from me, to the point that we had not slept in the same room or had sex in over 12 months. I knew this was not normal but when I would bring it up, he had logical work-related reasons for using the spare bedroom, and could not give any other reason for our low intimacy except “I’m tired and not thiking about it because I’m so busy”.

Also important to the situation is a female “friend” that I don’t approve of, recently divorced, whose ex-hubby believes they were having an affair or some sort. I have had the same suspicions.

I thought counseling was starting to help. We were communicating more and hugging more. But this week he began to cry and sulk for no apparent reason.

Then today I learned that the friend’s ex-hubby had asked them to stop the friendship months ago, which both the woman and my husband refused. I had thought more of my husbands ethics. Also learned that husband has been lying to me about times when I thought he was at work but he was really at friends home.

He admits to lying about his location at times, but does not admit to any physical affair. I can’t believe him after so many lies and no visable attempts at affection for so long. He claims he loves me and wants to fix things, but when we try, he barely does the minimum required.

The reason for the crying and sulking this week: he said he was trying to decide if he should stay with me or leave me and keep his friend. That should not take 2 seconds of consideration!

My parents are going on 45 years of marriage. I never thought I would be in this position. I feel like I am turning my back on the sacrament of marriage, but I’m at the end of my rope with him…I try and try and he seems to find ways to blame me for not trusting him, when he’s lying all the time!

I need prayers, mostly, but also some thoughts from brains calmer than mine right now. I’ve asked him to not sleep here until I say otherwise. I may be seeing a lawyer on Monday, I’m not sure. The priest that I think of as a mentor is 1100 miles away. My heart and brain are telling me so many things and I don’t know what to do.

c
[/quote]

I will pray for you both. If your Husband is telling you he isnt haveing an affair then I would say to give him the benefit of the doubt. It’s ok to have friends but your Marriage is way more important. You should tell him that if he really wants to try to patch things up that changes are going to need to be made. He needs to be spending his time with you and not this friend. Stress the changes that are going to need to be done and seek additional counseling. If he loves you he will do this for you. Whatever you both do please dont give up. Your Marriage is a sacred gift from God and he loves you both very much.

Peace of Christ be with you!


#5

You clearly recognize that your marriage cannot continue if there are three of you involved in it. Your husband needs to take a firm stand that his affair (whether purely emotional or more) is over, genuinely seek your forgiveness and focus on recommitting himself to his vows to you. I think marriages can recover from infidelity, but there needs to be clear understanding and communication that what happened was wrong and destructive and selfish, and the offender needs to cut off any and all contact with the "friend’ and demonstrate behaviour that is above reproach and suspicion.

It doesn’t sound to me like that’s the message your getting by your husband’s continued dishonesty and crying over his lost lover. Perhaps you two do need some time apart to sort this out, because there are always two sides to every marriage dilema. But, as the one who appears to have violated his vows and lied to you unless he demonstrates some serious remorse and initiative to make amends and repair your relationship, I’m not sure you should take him back. You can’t pressure, convince or demand that he change into the man you want him to be no matter how much you want to save your marriage.


#6

Thank you all for your inspirational words and support. I should add, to clarify the intimacy situation, that we are 30 years old.

Today I’m not making any decisions, but I did go to the bank to secure my financial situation just in case. I have to be practical. I’m thanking God we have no children. I went to my local chapel and prayed my rosary this afternoon, at first it was hard to meditate on the mysteries without thinking of my own troubles, but finally it became very peaceful and I felt Our Lord and His Mother listening.

I am willing to give him ONE more chance if he will meet some very stringent demands, including moving out of state, and continue counseling and be FRANK during sessions, this time. He’s unaware of this so far, I will likely speak with him Monday.

The thing is I HAVE given him the benefit of the doubt, for at least 14 months now, over and over. He has continuously promised to make changes that never materialized. I feel he did not take the Sacrament of our marriage seriously, even though previously was the more devout Catholic in our relationship. I feel he has used MY respect for the vows between us to lie and go behind my back, always knowing that I will be there to forgive and try again. I even fear he may have manipulated my past bout of clinical depression to get me to leave so he could go his own way.

Logically and practically, if he has any hope of gaining upper hand in any settlement, he must NOT admit to an affair. Hubby is a super smart guy, he knows this. Its not only this, but the fact he has lied repeatedly over such a length of time, that I think I can no longer believe anything he says.

Thank you for your prayers, their effect is already felt.
c


#7

[quote=cecilia97]Thank you all for your inspirational words and support. I should add, to clarify the intimacy situation, that we are 30 years old.
[/quote]

No physical intimacy is NOT a normal condition. He either has serious medical issues, or he is finding his intimacy somewhere else.

He has lied about being at work so he can see her…hmmmm.
He is crying about not being able to see her again. Now why does he think you should believe that he is not having an affair?

I am willing to give him ONE more chance if he will meet some very stringent demands, including moving out of state, and continue counseling and be FRANK during sessions, this time. He’s unaware of this so far, I will likely speak with him Monday.

Sounds reasonable considering his past behavior.

The thing is I HAVE given him the benefit of the doubt, for at least 14 months now, over and over. He has continuously promised to make changes that never materialized.

A man who refuses to have sex with his wife for a year and lies about being with another woman does not deserve “the benefit of the doubt”, mostly because there is no doubt. This is an affair, if not physical (doubtful) at least emotionally in a way that is every bit as unfaithful.

You are right to seek to heal your marriage. Now he has a choice. He can be faithful and stop seeing this woman, or not and suffer the consequences.


#8

I’m really happy to hear you’ve taken some steps to pray to Our Lady for her help, she will never leave you, Our Lord Jesus Christ will be your healer and the Spirit will give you guidence and strength…
I read your last post and related to it so much when you said he knew you would always remain loyal to him because of your devout belief in marriage. Your loyalty, he could trust you to be faithful and honor your vows. My husband chose me because of those same reasons.
He wanted from me what he himself did not have. He robbed me and used me knowing that I would go to the ends of the earth to keep our union holy and pure.
Sometimes I think people chose their partner based on some of those reasons. Please listen to what your heart is telling you. Listen to the peacefull message of the rosary to help you find your way.
I will pray for you and your husband, that he may see the error of his ways and do what is right, not only for the sake of your marriage but also for his own redemption.
Remember aways to take your marriage to the foot of the cross and keep your heart soft, soft, soft. Remain blameless in His sight, do what is right and pray His will be done. Offer up your suffering during this time of Lent, fast and pray and be pro-active. I mean for you to act, not re-act, and it sounds like you’re doing that. Take your time, think things through…
May Our Lord continue to bless you and remain in his mothers care.


#9

Jase,

Thank you, I think I recall you from another site and if you are the person I’m remembering, I feel your thoughts are trustworthy.

all4jmj,

your words are beautiful and I will continue to pray.

Everyone,

Update for this afternoon is that I have family coming in to take care of me for the next few weeks. I activated my friend “reserves” (including CA!) and I now feel surrounded by love and prayers. I have plans to visit my priest/mentor within the next month. I may speak with someone here but don’t know what random reponses (priests’ personal opinions) I might get considering the strange parish activities I see in my area. I also have a secular counseling apointment scheduled.

Monday I must take action on practical matters, but not planning to do anything “serious” until we’ve spoken again and I can get my head straight. I understand the importance of the promises we made before God, but also fear I may have been the only human at the altar committed to keeping those promises. I’ll have to wait and see.

thank you,
c


#10

I think Island Oak and Semper Jase are spot on, and I think it was wise of you to protect yourself financially. As gross as it sounds, have yourself tested for STDs, too. Next door in the Diocese of Rockford, I am praying for you.


#11

[quote=cecilia97]Jase,

Thank you, I think I recall you from another site and if you are the person I’m remembering, I feel your thoughts are trustworthy.

all4jmj,

your words are beautiful and I will continue to pray.

Everyone,

Update for this afternoon is that I have family coming in to take care of me for the next few weeks. I activated my friend “reserves” (including CA!) and I now feel surrounded by love and prayers. I have plans to visit my priest/mentor within the next month. I may speak with someone here but don’t know what random reponses (priests’ personal opinions) I might get considering the strange parish activities I see in my area. I also have a secular counseling apointment scheduled.

Monday I must take action on practical matters, but not planning to do anything “serious” until we’ve spoken again and I can get my head straight. I understand the importance of the promises we made before God, but also fear I may have been the only human at the altar committed to keeping those promises. I’ll have to wait and see.

thank you,
c
[/quote]

That is a fascinating quote, Cecilia…"that you might have been the only human at the altar committed to keeping those promises." I was thinking as I’ve pondered your thread, that it’s quite possible that your husband was not the one that God would have chosen for you. I’m not sure if you sought God prior to getting married, pertaining to finding the right mate, but it sounds like he just isn’t committed, and a marriage will only work if BOTH parties are willing. GOOD LUCK–MY PRAYERS ARE WITH YOU.


#12

[quote=cecilia97]Thank you all for your inspirational words and support. I should add, to clarify the intimacy situation, that we are 30 years old.

Today I’m not making any decisions, but I did go to the bank to secure my financial situation just in case. I have to be practical. I’m thanking God we have no children. I went to my local chapel and prayed my rosary this afternoon, at first it was hard to meditate on the mysteries without thinking of my own troubles, but finally it became very peaceful and I felt Our Lord and His Mother listening.

I am willing to give him ONE more chance if he will meet some very stringent demands, including moving out of state, and continue counseling and be FRANK during sessions, this time. He’s unaware of this so far, I will likely speak with him Monday.

The thing is I HAVE given him the benefit of the doubt, for at least 14 months now, over and over. He has continuously promised to make changes that never materialized. I feel he did not take the Sacrament of our marriage seriously, even though previously was the more devout Catholic in our relationship. I feel he has used MY respect for the vows between us to lie and go behind my back, always knowing that I will be there to forgive and try again. I even fear he may have manipulated my past bout of clinical depression to get me to leave so he could go his own way.

Logically and practically, if he has any hope of gaining upper hand in any settlement, he must NOT admit to an affair. Hubby is a super smart guy, he knows this. Its not only this, but the fact he has lied repeatedly over such a length of time, that I think I can no longer believe anything he says.

Thank you for your prayers, their effect is already felt.
c
[/quote]

A view from the other side:

If you are really serious then you have to step back from the situation and evaluate it objectively. I see a lot of danger signals from your side too.

Beat him to the bank huh? Then you already made up your mind.

Stringent demands? Nobody likes to be dictated to.

Counceling? That is a woman’s sport. Men have little use or respect for the whole business.

Separate rooms? Not so unusual. I refused to sleep with my ex for nearly 5 years. No, I was not tired. I wasn’t busy either. She was simply a viscious harpy that could never get enough of spite and malice. I couldn’t stand the thought of touching her. And no I didn’t cheat on her. My hands were full with the one I had.

Now, I am not saying that you are as bad as all that. I swear nobody but her could be. What I will say is that you are fully invested in the feminist dogma that says that it has to be all his fault because he is a man. The fact is that times are changing again. Men your age don’t knuckle under to threats and dramatics the way men of my generation did. Women just don’t know that yet. Even if they did they would proceed as usual because the feminists taught them no other way.

My advice to you? Ask your grandmother about it. She will remember what it was like to deal with an intelligent man who saw himself as such.


#13

[quote=richbansha]A view from the other side:

If you are really serious then you have to step back from the situation and evaluate it objectively. I see a lot of danger signals from your side too.

Beat him to the bank huh? Then you already made up your mind.

Stringent demands? Nobody likes to be dictated to.

Counceling? That is a woman’s sport. Men have little use or respect for the whole business.

Separate rooms? Not so unusual. I refused to sleep with my ex for nearly 5 years. No, I was not tired. I wasn’t busy either. She was simply a viscious harpy that could never get enough of spite and malice. I couldn’t stand the thought of touching her. And no I didn’t cheat on her. My hands were full with the one I had.

Now, I am not saying that you are as bad as all that. I swear nobody but her could be. What I will say is that you are fully invested in the feminist dogma that says that it has to be all his fault because he is a man. The fact is that times are changing again. Men your age don’t knuckle under to threats and dramatics the way men of my generation did. Women just don’t know that yet. Even if they did they would proceed as usual because the feminists taught them no other way.

My advice to you? Ask your grandmother about it. She will remember what it was like to deal with an intelligent man who saw himself as such.
[/quote]

My grandmother shared equal financial responsibilty with my grandfather throughout their happy 60 year marriage. You know nothing about her.

Feminist? Absolutely not, you don’t know me. Sounds like you might be a little bitter from your own experiences and are letting them color your opinions. That’s OK.

Beat him to the bank? Absolutely yes. I provided the $50k downpayment on this house. I paid for his final year of college. I intend to recoup my investments if I have to. Any man would say the same, it has nothing to do with gender.

c


#14

[quote=richbansha]A view from the other side:

If you are really serious then you have to step back from the situation and evaluate it objectively. I see a lot of danger signals from your side too.

Beat him to the bank huh? Then you already made up your mind.

Stringent demands? Nobody likes to be dictated to.

Counceling? That is a woman’s sport. Men have little use or respect for the whole business.

Separate rooms? Not so unusual. I refused to sleep with my ex for nearly 5 years. No, I was not tired. I wasn’t busy either. She was simply a viscious harpy that could never get enough of spite and malice. I couldn’t stand the thought of touching her. And no I didn’t cheat on her. My hands were full with the one I had.

Now, I am not saying that you are as bad as all that. I swear nobody but her could be. What I will say is that you are fully invested in the feminist dogma that says that it has to be all his fault because he is a man. The fact is that times are changing again. Men your age don’t knuckle under to threats and dramatics the way men of my generation did. Women just don’t know that yet. Even if they did they would proceed as usual because the feminists taught them no other way.

My advice to you? Ask your grandmother about it. She will remember what it was like to deal with an intelligent man who saw himself as such.
[/quote]

Good heavens, this is too mean-spirited to be true. Surely, you are not a practicing Catholic. I will pray for you that your heart may be softened.


#15

[quote=cecilia97]My grandmother shared equal financial responsibilty with my grandfather throughout their happy 60 year marriage. You know nothing about her.

Feminist? Absolutely not, you don’t know me. Sounds like you might be a little bitter from your own experiences and are letting them color your opinions. That’s OK.

Beat him to the bank? Absolutely yes. I provided the $50k downpayment on this house. I paid for his final year of college. I intend to recoup my investments if I have to. Any man would say the same, it has nothing to do with gender.

c
[/quote]

Well, like I said. I think your mind is made up. This reply is not intended to sway you. I do sincerely wish you luck. I wouldn’t want anyone to be unhappy if they don’t have to be. Chin up. Walk tall. You have every chance of making out just fine and being very happy. God keep you close.

For the benefit of other readers, I will try to bolster my statements in the last post.

I think every woman, married or soon to be, should consult her grandmother often. The reason is that young men now are more like the men of the 40’s and 50’s than the baby boom generation. Cecilia’s grandmother is proof positive that women her age know how to deal with the young men of today.

It is a measurable demographic fact that young men are joining an unofficial but fast growing marriage strike. This is unfortunate because young women now are much better potential mates than women my age. These men are in open rebellion against all of the outmoded popular opinion still circulating in the media.

Marriage counceling is a farce in the eyes of today’s young men. They cop the attitude, “Why do I have to pay $100 an hour when I can be criticized at home for free?”

Young men are far more pragmatic and do not have an idealistic bone in their bodies when it comes to relationships. Half have not seen their fathers in years. Many don’t know him at all. They do not want to gamble their own children on the fleeting whims and fancies of any woman or the absent mercies of the hostile divorce industry.

Women have many hurdles to clear with the young men to persude them to really invest in a marriage. It isn’t fair, but I think a good number of women will be equal to the task. They are the best crop of Americans in many many years.


#16

Gee, Rich, you sure are fast and free-wheeling with the generalizations about young women and young men today. :rolleyes: Your comments are insulting to women and don’t help the young woman who wrote this thread. I feel sorry for your ex-wife–your characterization of her says more about you than about her. :tsktsk:


#17

Although things are really emotional right now and wounds are open, if your husband is willing to work on your marriage I would suggest RETROUVAILLE. Their website is retrouvaille.org/

It is an awesome program for troubled marriages and is usually the last stop before divorce court. My husband and I went through their weekend retreat for couples over three years and it was worth every second. The healing and communication skills that take place during the weekend are incredible.

It is difficult to think about healing right now. But God wants you to build your marriage on solid rock not shifting sands…and shifting sands is where you are at now. But Jesus can heal any heart and mend ANY marriage.

I will keep you and your husband in my prayers.


#18

[quote=richbansha]Well, like I said. I think your mind is made up. This reply is not intended to sway you. I do sincerely wish you luck. I wouldn’t want anyone to be unhappy if they don’t have to be. Chin up. Walk tall. You have every chance of making out just fine and being very happy. God keep you close.

For the benefit of other readers, I will try to bolster my statements in the last post.

I think every woman, married or soon to be, should consult her grandmother often. The reason is that young men now are more like the men of the 40’s and 50’s than the baby boom generation. Cecilia’s grandmother is proof positive that women her age know how to deal with the young men of today.

It is a measurable demographic fact that young men are joining an unofficial but fast growing marriage strike. This is unfortunate because young women now are much better potential mates than women my age. These men are in open rebellion against all of the outmoded popular opinion still circulating in the media.

Marriage counceling is a farce in the eyes of today’s young men. They cop the attitude, “Why do I have to pay $100 an hour when I can be criticized at home for free?”

Young men are far more pragmatic and do not have an idealistic bone in their bodies when it comes to relationships. Half have not seen their fathers in years. Many don’t know him at all. They do not want to gamble their own children on the fleeting whims and fancies of any woman or the absent mercies of the hostile divorce industry.

Women have many hurdles to clear with the young men to persude them to really invest in a marriage. It isn’t fair, but I think a good number of women will be equal to the task. They are the best crop of Americans in many many years.
[/quote]

richbansha…you need some counseling! :stuck_out_tongue:


#19

[quote=whatevergirl]richbansha…you need some counseling! :stuck_out_tongue:
[/quote]

That’s what everybody says. One of these days I might actually start to believe it. :thumbsup:


#20

I know half this thread is gone due to the forum crash, but I wanted to take a quick minute to thank everyone for their prayers. I’m doing fine, I’ve moved and I’m rebuilding my business, home, and relationships with friends/family. This is still not the outcome I would have liked or expected, but I’m determined to make the best of it.

Eucharistic adoration and MANY rosaries have made this time bearable for me. Sad that it took such a bad event, but I’m closer to God and the Church than I’ve been in years.

Thanks and God Bless,
c


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.