Assisted Suicide Bill Passes California Assembly

lifesitenews.com/ldn/2008/may/08052901.html

Psalm 93/94 comes to mind.

Extremely biased…that’s fine. If you truly would want to live as Terry was 'living," then try it.

IMHO, she had passed into the Lord’s hands long before her official death.

Assisted death is a fact…has been as long as humans have populated this planet.

John

One of my areas I have worked with is Elder Abuse and Dependant Adult victims. Bills like this really scare me because there will be little protection some of these victims will have now. This will be used as a tool for criminals, but, they will be able to get away with it.

Assisted death is a fact? Well that sure makes it valuable… As for Terry, well she deserved better. Error on the side of life.

We must pray very hard that God be merciful, and that He continues to call sinners back to Him.

Bills like this really scare me because there will be little protection some of these victims will have now.

I’m not really sure what you are trying to say here, but I am inferring that you belive that if this bill is passed, it will be abused. Assisted suicide is already legal in the state of Oregon and there is no evidence that it has been abused. The criteria for patients wishing to end their own lives is very stringent; it would take a lot for a physician to override the regulations in place without being detected. I doubt too many would want to take the risk.

Personally, I say good for California! We Catholics are not any more justified in telling terminally ill patients that they cannot end their lives because we believe that it is a sin then a JW would be in trying to pass legislation barring blood transfusions.

Then you aren’t justified in calling yourself a Catholic. Comparing the Church’s ardent desire and God-given mission to preserve life to the beliefs of the Jehova’s Witnesses is ridiculous. The law explicitly permits doctors and nurses to play on the emotions and impaired faculties of the terminally ill and coerce them into to choosing suicide! :banghead:

Funny that most of the MD’s that evaluated her stated she was not in a vegetative state. Plus, i haven’t seen any patients in vegetative states that reacted differently depending on who was in the room.

Comparing the Church’s ardent desire and God-given mission to preserve life to the beliefs of the Jehova’s Witnesses is ridiculous.

Are you really so closed-minded that you can’t see that other religions have the same rights to call themselves the truth as we do?

The law explicitly permits doctors and nurses to play on the emotions and impaired faculties of the terminally ill and coerce them into to choosing suicide

Eh… don’t think so. Lifesite has a very biased view of these things; here is the actual text of the bill:

AB 2747 Assembly Bill - AMENDED

BILL NUMBER: AB 2747 AMENDED BILL TEXT AMENDED IN

ASSEMBLY APRIL 7, 2008 AMENDED IN ASSEMBLY MARCH 25,

2008 INTRODUCED BY Assembly Members Berg and Levine

                 FEBRUARY 22, 2008   An act to add

Part 1.8 (commencing with Section 442) to Division 1of the Health and Safety Code, relating to end-of-life care. LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST AB 2747, as amended, Berg. End-of-life care. Existing law provides for the licensure and regulation of health facilities and hospices by the State Department of Public Health. Existing law provides for the regulation and licensing of physicians and surgeons by the Medical Board of California. This bill would provide that when an attending physician makes a diagnosis that a patient has a terminal illness or makes a prognosis that a patient has less than one year to live, the health care provider shall provide the patient with the opportunity to receive information and counseling regarding legal end-of-life options, as specified, and provide for the referral or transfer of a patient if the patient’s physician does not wish to comply with the patient’s choice of end-of-life options. Vote: majority. Appropriation: no. Fiscal committee: no. State-mandated local program: no.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

SECTION 1. The Legislature finds and declares all of the following: (a) Palliative and hospice care are invaluable resources for terminally ill Californians in need of comfort and support at the end of life. (b)Palliative care and conventional medical treatment should be thoroughly integrated rather than viewed as separate entities. © Even though Californians with a prognosis of six months or less to live are eligible for hospice care, nearly two-thirds of them receive hospice services for less than one month. (d) Many patients benefit from being referred to hospice care earlier, where they receive better pain and symptom management and have an improved quality of life. (e) Significant information gaps may exist between health care providers and their patients on end-of-life care options potentially leading to delays to, or lack of, referrals to hospice care for terminally ill patients. The sharing of important information regarding specific treatment options in a timely manner by healthcare providers is a key component of quality end-of-life care. Information that is helpful to patients and their families includes, but is not limited to, the availability of hospice care, the efficacy and potential side effects of continued curative treatment, and withholding or withdrawal of life sustaining treatments. (f) Terminally ill and dying patients rely on their health care providers to give them timely and informative data. Research shows alack of communication between health care providers and their terminally ill patients can cause problems, including poor availability of, and lack of clarity regarding, advanced health care directives and patients’ end-of-life care preferences. This lack of information and poor adherence to patient choices results result in “bad deaths” that cause needless physical and psychological suffering to patients and their families. (g) Those problems are complicated by social issues, such as cultural and religious pressures for the providers, patients, and their family members. A recent survey found that providers that object to certain practices are less likely than others to believe they have an obligation to present all of the options to patients and refer patients to other providers, if necessary. (h) Every medical school in California is required to include end-of-life care issues in its curriculum and every physician in California is required to complete continuing education courses in end-of-life care. (i)Palliative care is not a one-size-fits-all approach. Patients have a range of diseases and respond differently to treatment options. A key benefit of palliative care is that it customizes treatment to meet the needs of each individual person. (j) Informed patient choices will help terminally ill patients and their families cope with one of life’s most challenging situations. SEC. 2. Part 1.8 (commencing with Section 442) is added to Division 1 of the Health and Safety Code, to read:

Continued…

PART 1.8. End-Of-Life Care 442. For the purposes of this part, the following definitions shall apply: (a) “Curative treatment” means treatment intended to cure or alleviate symptoms of a given disease or condition. (b) “Hospice” means a specialized form of interdisciplinary healthcare that is designed to provide palliative care, alleviate the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual discomforts of an individual who is experiencing the last phases of life due to the existence of a terminal disease, and provide supportive care to the primary caregiver and the family of the hospice patient, and that meets all of the criteria specified in subdivision (b) of Section1746. © “Palliative care” means medical treatment, interdisciplinary care, or consultation provided to a patient or family members, or both, that has as its primary purpose the prevention of, or relief from, suffering and the enhancement of the quality of life, rather than treatment aimed at investigation and intervention for the purpose of cure or prolongation of life as described in subdivision (b) of Section 1339.31. (d) “Palliative sedation” means the use of sedative medications to relieve extreme suffering by making the patient unaware and unconscious, while artificial food and hydration are withheld, during the progression of the disease leading to the death of the patient. (e) “Refusal or withdrawal of life sustaining treatment” means forgoing treatment or medical procedures that replace or support an essential bodily function, including, but not limited to, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, artificial nutrition and hydration, dialysis, and any other treatment or discontinuing any or all of those treatments after they have been used for a reasonable time. (f) “Voluntary stopping of eating and drinking” or “VSED” means the voluntary refusal of a patient to eat and drink in order to alleviate his or her suffering, and includes the withholding or withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment at the request of the patient. 442.5. When an attending physician makes a diagnosis that a patient has a terminal illness or makes a prognosis that a patient has less than one year to live, the physician, or in the case of a patient in a health facility, as defined in Section 1250,the health facility, shall provide the patient with the opportunity to receive comprehensive information and counseling regarding legal end-of-life care options. When a patient is in a health facility, as defined in Section 1250, the attending physician or medical director may refer the patient to a hospice provider or private or public agencies and community-based organizations that specialize in end-of-life care case management and consultation to receive information and counseling regarding legal end-of-life care options. (a) If the patient indicates a desire to receive the information and counseling, the information shall include, but not be limited to, the following: (1) Hospice care at home or in a health care setting. (2) A prognosis with and without the continuation of curative treatment. (3) The patient’s right to refusal of or withdrawal from life-sustaining treatment. (4) The patient’s right to continue to pursue curative treatment while receiving palliative care. (5) The patient’s right to comprehensive pain and symptom management at the end of life, including, but not limited to, adequate pain medication, treatment of nausea, palliative chemotherapy, relief of shortness of breath and fatigue, VSED, and palliative sedation. (b) The information described in subdivision (a) may, but is not required to be, in writing. © Counseling may include, but not be limited to, discussions about the outcomes on the patient and his or her family, based on the interest of the patient. 442.7. If a physician does not wish to comply with his or her patient’s choice of end-of-life options, the health care provider shall do both of the following: (a) Refer or transfer a patient to an alternative health care provider. (b) Provide the patient with information on procedures to transfer to an alternative health care provider.

I see nothing in here that allows for physicians to terminate the life of patients without their consent.

Funny that most of the MD’s that evaluated her stated she was not in a vegetative state.

Source for that one, please.

covenantnews.com/terri050305.htm

terrisfight.org/pages.php?page_id=17

Let me try that again. Credible source, please.

:thumbsup:

PONG: Food and water are considered normal care by the Catholic Church.

It is sad that these type of bills will pass all around our country. This, along with abortion are really the sickest part of our culture. I am sort of surprised we can discuss this topic since it crosses over into politics. I think it is good and important that we do discuss it through the eyes of our religion. I wish we could discuss other topics that are of importance in our society right now too.

In my family we all decided a long time ago that we would not use those tubes to keep us alive when our bodies will just start to shut down on their own and we die a natural death.

My 96yr.old dad recently died on April 20th. He died at home peacefully. Hospice care was wonderful. They told us that my dad’s body parts were slowly shutting down. They knew exactly what to do and would explain things to us.
We all got to say good-bye to my dad in our own way. Every relative got to see him so when he died we were all at peace.
Our priest would also visit my dad and mom for three days straight before my dad died. I was happy that he got his final blessings from our priest.

There are some religions that believe that once you die you don’t live in the spirit world like in heaven. They say they are gone forever. There is no other side for them. There is no hell or heaven for them. I guess this is why the assisted suicide bill passed the Calif. Assembly. Some people do wish for death to come right away for them when they feel that life is almost over for them and they are in severe pain or their brains are no longer functioning normal. There are also people who don’t even believe in God.

When my times comes I plan to call Hospice to take care of me until I cross over to the other side and be with God. God will make sure no doctor curtails my life.

What many people fail to acknowledge is the part of the bill which states that people who choose to end their lives have to undergo counseling in regards to their decision. This doesn’t mean that in California they’re going to kill every person who is being wheeled into the emergency room screaming that they want to die - rationality has to be achieved so that the most sound, personal decision can be made.

http://www6.miami.edu/ethics/schiavo/2%20CTs.png

Left: normal brain. Right: Terri Schiavo’s brain. By this point, it had become so filled with spinal fluid that there wasn’t enough left to let her care or speak for herself. No one’s arguing that she reacted to people entering the room, but seeing as even plants can react to changes in their environment, it’s not an overly convincing argument as to her rationality. Because she was not able to care for herself, her husband made the decision to have her feeding tube removed. When you get married, generally (unless you provide a document stating otherwise) the rights of your decision-making go to your spouse.

I guarantee you that it will be abused. Mark my words, I have no ounce of doubt about it. It is a step in the right, well wrong, direction. There are quite a few cases I worked on that the person could have used this to get away with murder. You just need to know the right people.

Personally, I say good for California! We Catholics are not any more justified in telling terminally ill patients that they cannot end their lives because we believe that it is a sin then a JW would be in trying to pass legislation barring blood transfusions.

Like you said “personally.” Decisions like this lessens the impact of the sactinty of life. Each of these pro-death decisions does. You are saying some lifes are not a life worth living.

What a wonderful post. Hospice is incredible, most people don’t realize how much can be done to help ease the pain people are going through. I trust God to get me though my ending days, and I am with you on calling in Hospice if I need it to get me through.

Because she was not able to care for herself, her husband made the decision to have her feeding tube removed. When you get married, generally (unless you provide a document stating otherwise) the rights of your decision-making go to your spouse.

Her family wanted to take care of her. Would it have been so hard for him to let them do that. As a mother, if this was my daughter husband, I would have been devastated. They loved her. He moved on.

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