Astronomers Can't Explain How These Trillion-Degree Quasars Got So Hot


#1

Not surprisingly, astrophysicists are fascinated by the super-extreme conditions at the heart of quasars, and after years of research, scientists postulated that jets of plasma emitted by quasars could not reach more than 500 billion degrees kelvin. According to the current theory, the heating beyond that threshold would cause a massive transfer of energy from electrons to photons and result in quick cooling. However, the latest measurements made possible by Spektr-R show that some mysterious mechanism brings the effective temperature at the core of the quasar to a seemingly impossible range from 20 to 40 trillion degrees—at least 10 times above the theoretical ceiling. And this particular quasar may not even be the most intense.

popularmechanics.com/space/deep-space/a20351/quasar-temperature/

Looks like astronomers have just found hell. Plasma cosmology is amazing. We barely scratch the surface of it. The temp limit of that plasma may be near mugen. No atoms, no electromagnetic waves. So the plasma no longer emits infrared or light. Friction causes the heat and it “accumulates” since it can’t escape. Cool stuff.


#2

Well, I sure as heck can’t. Boggles the mind.


#3

Mugen?


#4

I think you mean hot stuff, hey? :wink:


#5

I meant near infinite.


#6

Current theory may have to be revised. There are also questions as to whether or not current theory explains dark matter.


#7

Now that’s hot!


#8

For all we know about the scientific world, we still don’t have an inkling as to the how, what, why, where and when of it all…and most probably never will.


#9

Dark Matter, etc.


#10

This is just like anything else, progression of technology tends to make past decades look silly…kind of like how we look back to the 60s and 70s and laugh about the room sized supercomputers that were advanced at the time, or some of the antiquated ideas and theories that have since been revised or found to be totally inaccurate, the same thing will happen with out current times.

In another 20-40 years, Im sure folks will be looking back to our times and getting a good laugh at some of our ‘old fashioned’ equipment and computers, and wonder how we could have held stock in some of the things we call fact today. LOL


#11

Dark matter, not even close. It is estimated the universe is made up of 72.8% dark energy, 22.7% dark matter and 4.5% ordinary matter.


#12

What, no one has blamed Bush, Cheney, and the republican party along with big oil yet?


#13

I think that dark matter is the modern version of the ether. The can’t identify it, they can’t locate it, nor can they point to it but they’re certain its out there. :rolleyes:


#14

The Russell’s Teapot of science?


#15

Yeah. That’s what I was thinking. Only without the ether.

Or something.


#16

Dark matter hypothesis rests on our current gravitational models. It may be missing mass, or it may be a shortcoming of the model we don’t understand. Until the missing mass is found (not inferred) or a flaw in the model is detected, we will not know how to answer the question.


#17

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