Attending the Tridentine mass for the first time

hello all!

I was beginning to touch on the subject in another thread, but I made [RIGHT][/RIGHT]this thread to draw attention specifically to this issue. I did a search and was surprised not find any like minded posts. (or a more likely case is that i’m not very good with the search feature).

I want to attend a Tridentine mass tomorrow morning. But I am very intimidated because the parish I will be attending is for francophones. English is my only language I won’t be able to ask any questions or use any literature if they have any. So I am wondering if you could help me make this as painless as possible.

First of all, does anyone have a link to the 1962 missal? I would really appreciate one which includes actions as well (i.e when you hit your chest, kneel, etc). And one that of course has an English translation.

Secondly, anyone aware of any do’s and don’ts list for attending a Tridentine mass?

Thirdly, what should I wear? Would it be wrong to wear what I usually wear to Sunday mass? I usually wear simple beige dress pants and a golf shirt or casual button shirt.

Fourth, I imagine that the homily will be in French. Is it wrong to hear the homily in another language? I imagine its not, but keep in mind this is the only parish in the area that offers the traditional mass.

I think that’s it. If anyone else has suggestions please, suggest away. My goal for tonight is to watch an online Tridentine mass and follow along with the missal that I hope I will find, just to have the basics down for tomorrow.

Translation of the Mass:
truecatholic.org/masstrad.htm
(beware, the rest of the website is absolute wackiness)
catholicliturgy.com/index.cfm/FuseAction/Text/Index/4/SubIndex/66/ContentIndex/18/Start/17 has some of the gestures

You should dress well, and it shouldn’t be different than attending any other mass.

Do’s and Don’ts - shouldn’t be any different than any other mass I hope, dress nice, no cell phone.

Observe, try to follow along, it takes getting used to.

yeah i guess it is that easy.I have the bad habit of exaggerating social events.

I’m almost done making my booklet, I’ll follow along with some videos i came across on you tube. And Lord willing, tomorrow will be fine.

One thing to keep in mind, there may be some boarderline super-conservatives there (novus ordo not valid, there is no pope etc) although if it is a chuch in communion with Rome this is not likely.

The church I started going to apparently had a ton of drama prior to my joining. The original priest was alienated from the archdioses and was “independent” Catholic Church. Some alleged after the priest died that he wished it to go to SSPX, others insisted that he wanted to give it to a priest in good standing with the Chuch, and many left the parish over the move.

I’ve done a lot of poking around, and on another forum I’ve been in contact with a super anti novus ordo guy. I have fair idea of what you’re talking about.

Well this parish is listed on the archdiocese of Montreal website. So I assume it’s in good standing. (I won’t be able to know for sure, the homily will be in French :frowning: )

Don’t worry or be intimated. Nobody will look down on you. I would wear a nice jacket, preferrably a suit jacket if you have one over your attire. Most men at my parish wear suits and ties. Turn off your cellphone, or better yet don’t bring it inside.
They should offer Confession beforehand, try and get there early if you need Confession, just get in the back of the line and don’t stand near the Confessional. Genuflect toward the Tabernacle before going into the Pew. Also Bless yourself with the Sign of the Cross when you come in. Bow to the Priest as He comes down the aisle and when he leaves. Don’t say Amen after receiving Holy Communion. Missals should be in the pews, in your case, I don’t know if there will be a latin/english one. You might be able to ask someone before going in. There should be a greeter that will recognize you as new and will help you and possible seat you with someone to help you follow the Mass. Just watch what everyone else is doing and what is taking place on the Altar. After Mass, outside, introduce yourself, I think you will find everyone to be very charitable and helpful. You are not exaggerating, you are doing fine, I had the same questions when I attended my first Traditional Mass in years, except I needed to find a mantilla.:wink:

Site on the Order of the Mass.

fisheaters.com/TLMinstructions.html

My Priests are French and one is from Montreal. They are angels. :slight_smile:

mysite.verizon.net/missale/order.html

That might help, and just relax. People wont be looking at you but rather the altar or reading along with their missals. Most regulars of the Tridentine Mass realize its not the norm and so they expect and are accustomed to newbies coming along every once in a while and if you ever get lost with the missal, just follow along with everyone else. All it is is actions (kneeling, sitting, standing, crossing, etc) so you wont have to worry about responding the wrong thing or mispronouncing anything since the laity don’t say anything throughout the Mass - only the altar boys and choir make responses.

Business casual style of dress suffices though you might see most men with suits on and younger guys with polos and slacks on.

I went to Mass in Quebec City last summer. Yup, everything was in French, and it was a Novus Ordo Mass. It wasn’t that hard to follow along, though. You’re getting English translations for the Latin text off the internet, so it’s just the homily you will miss out on. Won’t be long before you pick up some French if you’re going to be there for awhile.

Excellent tips, thank you very much.

I don’t know why I think this, but for whatever reason I have in my mind that my english speaking self won’t be that welcomed. I just assume that because they will most likely be conservative/traditional and Quebecois that my Hanglishness will be looked down upon. Who knows? perhaps there will be anglophones there because this is the only Latin indult in the area. I guess there is no better way to find out then to go.

I’m enjoying all your posts, thanks a lot! and please keep them coming! All these little things help.

So…pleae let us know how it goes, ok?

Aren’t you going in Montreal, though? Most people speak English there. When I was in Quebec City, everyone spoke French, until you spoke French back to them poorly, and then they could suddenly all speak English! :shrug:

That’s all very true, but I’ve hit pockets of some nationalist types in some strange areas. It does happen, not very often at all in Montreal especially. I just figure that because it’s a conservative parish those types may be attracted? … It’s rather stupid, I have nothing to really explain myself. Just thinking of the worse possible scenerio.

Anyway, to the above poster… Yes I’ll be sure to share my expierence.

I have to do a few more things then im off to bed. You traditionalists must be early birds, this mass is offered at 8 in the morning only!

It was wonderful!
A bit further from my residency than I had thought but even still it was maybe 15mins on the metro and than a 15 minute walk.

I had left really early (6am) hoping to find someone to inquire about a missal. I found the Church at 7 and I was hearing Latin chanted already, and so I became really worried thinking that mass was at 7 and not 8 like I had previously thought. Much to my relief I found out that it was some parishoners doing the rosary in three languages (Latin, English and French). It was really beautiful and I had never seen a rosary done the way the did it. It was very revrent and I took the time to reflect.

Anyway as I was reflecting, I saw a man enter and sit at the back. I went up to go ask him some questions, but sure enough he could barely speak english. Anyway, he was really nice and helpful, but he informed that there was only French material available.

Mass began and the priest entered from the back of the Church, I had been expecting to bow to him when he entered from the front. I later found out during the sermon that the normal priest was sick and that this was a retired priest , and very elderly from what I could see. He was even using the alter servers to help get him around.

Speaking of which, I absolutely loved the alter servers. Those guys were amazing. I could see why someone wanted to be an alter server back in the day. I didn’t realize how important they were.

Much to my relief the homily was in English and in French. He had a thick accent, very thick, but I got most of it down, and his English was pretty good. The homily was very good and informative. I enjoyed it.

Now the only trouble I had was following around in my home made missal. The mass seemed to skip certain sections. And at other times I couldn’t make out what the priest was saying, even though it was a small parish. The other problem was making out what the choir was saying, but I think I just need to adjust my ears to Latin. For the most part I could pick out what the Choir was singing.

Oh, I was wondering… at times am I not suppouse to hear the priest? And I was also wondering if it was possible that I couldn’t hear some certain parts because the priest was elderly. Are the communion prayers usually said aloud or in a quiet voice?

Communion was quite a surprise. I had thought communion rails was an Anglican thing? I guess I’m wrong.

On the whole I loved it, and will definitely go back again. Before I go again, I’ll want to answer some questions I have and learn the mass a little bit better. I don’t see the use in making the trek if I haven’t done my homework.

Pax Domini sit semper vobiscum!

Many parts of the Mass are said by the priest in a low voice (that’s how it’s supposed to be done, according to the rubrics). So you won’t be able to hear everything he says, even if you sit in the very first pew. That’s why it’s helpful to have a Missal to follow along. If the priest is saying the Mass properly, you won’t hear all the prayers, even if he is young.

Great testimonial. What a nice appreciation for this wonderful gift God has given us.

And not to worry about not hearing some of the words. It may take a while to get used to the lower decibel level of the TLM but the priest is following the rubrics perfectly, according to the Council of Trent.

Your experience reminds me of a TLM I attended during a symposium in Rockford. It was a beautiful Mass, and it wasn’t until later, I realized the priest spoke no English at all, because during his presentation, Monsignor Schmitz had to translate his French to us.

No one needed to translate the TLM for us though. :wink:

Ah so I see… do you have any links that contain such “rubrics”? I do think it was a mix of the two, because you could hear him struggling to sing some parts.

I thought of some more questions though.

The cross behind the alter of the Church (the big one) was a resurrected Christ, I thought Traditional Catholics preferred the crucified Christ? Wasn’t the whole ressurrected Christ for this place a grievance for Traditional Catholics?

Is it okay for the procession to come from behind the alter? (well more from the side).

I also once saw in a movie where a Traditional mass was being done, that everyone at one point placed there hand upon their chest. Is that just a Hollywood thing? I don’t remember seeing this during the mass, but at the same time I was flipping through my missal quite a bit.

Can the Precious Blood be given out during a TLM? I was expecting it and had always thought that the Precious Blood was a pre-Vatican II thing. I only had the precious Blood for the first time this year, but I guess it’s because the daily mass I sometimes go to is done in a chapel, and there are only a handful of us there. Is it the same idea for TLM? You don’t give out the Precious Blood if there is a crowd?

And lastly what do you guys think of this “Fish Eaters” website? I’m finding it very resourceful, and it seems like it’s O.K (nothing too anti Novus Ordo/ Vatican II).

You should have these in your missal or in those red missalettes they pass out, if they have any. The canon of the Mass is supposed to be totally silent except for the “Nobis Quoque Peccatoribus.” You must have been attending a High Mass or a Sung Mass.

I also once saw in a movie where a Traditional mass was being done, that everyone at one point placed there hand upon their chest. Is that just a Hollywood thing? I don’t remember seeing this during the mass, but at the same time I was flipping through my missal quite a bit.

I know as an altar boy, I was instructed to have one of my hands placed on my heart when the other hand was occupied with a cruet or thurifer or something like that. I’ve seen where people have two hands over their chest but I don’t see that as the norm. The norm was to have both hands straight up and together with the right thumb over the left.

Can the Precious Blood be given out during a TLM? I was expecting it and had always thought that the Precious Blood was a pre-Vatican II thing. I only had the precious Blood for the first time this year, but I guess it’s because the daily mass I sometimes go to is done in a chapel, and there are only a handful of us there. Is it the same idea for TLM? You don’t give out the Precious Blood if there is a crowd?

It may have been a matter of discipline because the Council of Trent had ruled that you receive both the Body and Blood from one species only.

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