Attire for visiting basilica in Rome

I’ll be visiting Rome in October, and I heard that women have to wear clothes a certain way to be able to enter the basilicas. Like they have to wear dress, etc… Is that true? If so, what is the require attire so that I can pack. Thanks!

From what I’ve heard and read: Shorts are not allowed for men or women, tank tops, bare shoulders or short skirts are not permitted. Dress appropriately or they will turn you away from the entrance.

Cover your shoulders and cover your knees. I would wear a skirt or dress if it was me, but I think pants are fine.

I’m sure someone will come along with something more official. :wink:

P.S. - You already know this, but you’re so lucky you get to go!! So happy for you! :slight_smile:

I may have worn trousers of some description in St Peters, certainly we weren’t told that we couldn’t do so.

It was some years back though, not to mention I was too busy just being overwhelmed by the place to remember what I was wearing … so much beauty! I’m sure the entrance has holes in the floor from everyone’s jaws dropping to the ground.

Enjoy the spiritual and physical beauty. Say a prayer for all of us stuck back here. And say hi to Papa Benny for me :wink:

The only real dress code in Rome is no shorts or short skirts and no bare shoulders. You can wear pants or short sleeved tops, even T shirts. Now if you go to a church is Greece it is a lot different…women cannot wear pants and they give you these big shawl like coverups to put around your waist if you wear pants. They also don’t allow bare shoulders in Greece. It was hot there when we went and light skirts were cooler than pants anyway. Those who wanted to wear shorts bought those nice light beach sarongs to cover up with. In both countries there was no hat requirement.

saintpetersbasilica.org/Pics/SQR/DressCode-JG.jpg

As with all of the churches in Italy, the dress code is no bare knees or shoulders or anything in between (that’s actually the official dress code for men and women).

Love the sign, very cut-and-dry! :slight_smile:

Love that sign! That should be posted at every church’s entrance:D

Thanks all, for the info!

I’m very excited to go, and can’t wait for that day to come. I glad to hear the we don’t have to wear a dress, but I’ll probably bring one just in case I’m in the mood. :dancing:

PS: It looks like they are wearing swimsuits.

Isn’t that a great sign? Looks as if men aren’t allowed to wear purple early 20th century bathing costumes! :wink: We saw plenty of people being turned away; it was amazing what skimpy outfits they tried to sneak past the sharp-eyed guards.

You will truly walk around with your mouth hanging open. St. Peter’s is breathtaking, amazing, uplifting, heavenly! If you can, try to apply for tickets to take the Scavi tour underneath St. Peter’s. Here’s a link: vatican.va/roman_curia/institutions_connected/uffscavi/documents/rc_ic_uffscavi_doc_gen-information_20040112_en.html

Enjoy!

Not to be overly dramatic, but my first visit to the Vatican was one of the greatest joys in my life. The museum is breathtaking.

They mean business at St. Peter’s! The last time we went to Rome it was July and very hot. Our middle son, who was about 18 at the time, decided to wear shorts even though we told him not to. Just as we had warned him, he was not allowed to go into St. Peter’s. He and his younger brother quietly exchanged a few words, and then we went into the church with our younger son. After we had walked around for a while, our younger son told us that he wanted to look around on his own. We said ok. A few minutes later, much to our surprise, our older son appeared completely dressed in his brother’s clothes, even to his watch. We couldn’t believe our eyes. Our older son got to see St. Peter’s, and afterwards we all had a good laugh.

Years ago they used to have these ugly raincoat type things for people to wear if they were not dressed according to the code. I remember because I had to don one…but that was back in '72.

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