Attraction to Islam


#1

I was wanting to get some educated peoples’ opinions, hopefully even some priests’ opinions, on what you all think are some of the main real-world reasons (not supernatural type of things, like “Satan” is luring them, or anything like that) for this attraction to Islam amongst youths raised in Western secular cultures within Christian families.

My first cousin recently converted to Islam, and he’s really into it now, of course; the “convert’s zeal” as they say. But he was baptized Catholic, raised Catholic, his father I know went through a great deal of extra work to put him through all Catholic schools , including Catholic college (where, ironically, he met the Pakistani Muslim girl who is going to be his wife now). That’s way more Catholic education than I had. ( I only got it up until 9th grade / “freshman” year of hs). And MUCH MUCH more than my father , or my cousin’s father, ever had. They had absolutely zero Catholic education, except for a little “CCD” probably while young, and yet they’re definitely devout staunch Catholics. So, I don’t know, if it’s just something with the youth today, or something social, or does it in fact perhaps entail something more like a “rebellion” factor which some kids have and others just don’t ? For instance, I was thinking, if this kid, this cousin of mine, if he had been born into a devout strict Muslim family… maybe he’d be just the type who’d be looking into “other options” now that he’s 21 and grown .

Considering that Islam is IMO a much harder faith to live, and let’s face it it’s not really a religion but an entire “lifestyle” as they say, what prompts Western youth, so largely secularized and “me-first ’ ish” , for the most part, to even have any remote interest in joining a faith where they’re going to have to pray at least five times per day, fast dawn to dusk one whole month of the year, probably change their diet and drinking behaviors significantly, and make a trip to Mecca at least once ??

People convert to Catholicism, or Christianity in general let’s say, and some stay zealous and others wane. Some only go through , say, the RCIA for marital purposes w/ no serious intent of being a “devout Catholic”. That might sound untrue but it’s true; a buddy of mine just married a girl whose family is all part of a fairly anti-Catholic Protestant sect and he admitted to me she only did the whole thing to please his family. But, in Islam, there really is no such thing as being able to be just a “twice a year” Muslim, so to speak, or a “cafeteria Muslim”, or just a “cultural or INO” Muslim. Not unless you no longer want to really BE a Muslim that is. Because , and any Muslims here correct me if I’m wrong, but I don’t believe that other Muslims are going to consider you to still be a true Muslim if you cease praying daily, cease attending Friday congregational prayer, eat and drink whatever you like, do not fast during Ramadan, don’t read the Qu’ran daily or ever study it in Arabic as prescribed, don’t give anything to Islamic charities as prescribed, and don’t even remotely seriously intend to ever go to Mecca. In that case, you’re NOT really a Muslim, right?? Even if you technically took the “shahadah” .

What is it that they’re seeing in Islam that they’re not seeing in Christianity?


#2

In all seriousness I would have to suspect that in this case a major factor, if not the major factor, is his future wife. How many men or women do you know who converted to the faith of their future spouse? While only one explaination I do not think it should be discounted.


#3

[quote=TheBigQ]I was wanting to get some educated peoples’ opinions, hopefully even some priests’ opinions, on what you all think are some of the main real-world reasons (not supernatural type of things, like “Satan” is luring them, or anything like that) for this attraction to Islam amongst youths raised in Western secular cultures within Christian families.

My first cousin recently converted to Islam, and he’s really into it now, of course; the “convert’s zeal” as they say. But he was baptized Catholic, raised Catholic, his father I know went through a great deal of extra work to put him through all Catholic schools , including Catholic college (where, ironically, he met the Pakistani Muslim girl who is going to be his wife now). That’s way more Catholic education than I had. ( I only got it up until 9th grade / “freshman” year of hs). And MUCH MUCH more than my father , or my cousin’s father, ever had. They had absolutely zero Catholic education, except for a little “CCD” probably while young, and yet they’re definitely devout staunch Catholics. So, I don’t know, if it’s just something with the youth today, or something social, or does it in fact perhaps entail something more like a “rebellion” factor which some kids have and others just don’t ? For instance, I was thinking, if this kid, this cousin of mine, if he had been born into a devout strict Muslim family… maybe he’d be just the type who’d be looking into “other options” now that he’s 21 and grown .

Considering that Islam is IMO a much harder faith to live, and let’s face it it’s not really a religion but an entire “lifestyle” as they say, what prompts Western youth, so largely secularized and “me-first ’ ish” , for the most part, to even have any remote interest in joining a faith where they’re going to have to pray at least five times per day, fast dawn to dusk one whole month of the year, probably change their diet and drinking behaviors significantly, and make a trip to Mecca at least once ??

People convert to Catholicism, or Christianity in general let’s say, and some stay zealous and others wane. Some only go through , say, the RCIA for marital purposes w/ no serious intent of being a “devout Catholic”. That might sound untrue but it’s true; a buddy of mine just married a girl whose family is all part of a fairly anti-Catholic Protestant sect and he admitted to me she only did the whole thing to please his family. But, in Islam, there really is no such thing as being able to be just a “twice a year” Muslim, so to speak, or a “cafeteria Muslim”, or just a “cultural or INO” Muslim. Not unless you no longer want to really BE a Muslim that is. Because , and any Muslims here correct me if I’m wrong, but I don’t believe that other Muslims are going to consider you to still be a true Muslim if you cease praying daily, cease attending Friday congregational prayer, eat and drink whatever you like, do not fast during Ramadan, don’t read the Qu’ran daily or ever study it in Arabic as prescribed, don’t give anything to Islamic charities as prescribed, and don’t even remotely seriously intend to ever go to Mecca. In that case, you’re NOT really a Muslim, right?? Even if you technically took the “shahadah” .

What is it that they’re seeing in Islam that they’re not seeing in Christianity?
[/quote]

well… yes you are right about that part… there is no such thing as “part time Muslim” or “non practicing” or even “moderate” muslim… its either you are a muslim or you are not… i was one of those “muslims” by name even though I drank… never ate pork though… not my thing…did other stuff and all that good stuff… but as I started getting more serious and infact I started reading anti Islamic propaganda and started researching Islam more and started reading the Qu’ran…i truly started to become devout… i was really an agnost before…

i know tons of converts… most of them are my age (20) and arent married or even have a girlfriend anymore… one of my friends family is catholic and he became Muslim after reading the Qu’ran… this other guy I know… he started researching Islam after 9/11 and converted… and another one I know was a Catholic as well but his girlfriend was a “muslim” (by name only)…she did not do anything Islamic at all… he started researching Islam and became Muslim… he is more devout than most Muslims I know…and he is trying to get his girlfriend to bea Muslim as well… so there are good reasons and bad reasons… but you cant be muslim just because of some stupid reason such as your wife or husband or whatever… like it says “there is no compulsion in religion”… i hope this helps…
God bless.


#4

BigQ,

I’ll answer your question with two stories.

A cousin of my dad’s has converted to Sufi Islam together with her husband. She was Methodist, he was Catholic (this is in Britain). She said that she found a depth of spirituality in Sufism that she’d never found in Methodism–and her husband apparently had the same experience in Catholicism.

Here’s a more specific illustration:

This week I was teaching my Western Civ class about the “five pillars” of Islam. I explained about the Ramadan fast and one (Jewish) student commented, “Don’t most religions–Christianity for instance–have some kind of fasting?” I responded that yes, Christianity does have fasting as well. A Catholic student then piped up:

Student: “I’m Christian, and I don’t fast.”

Me: “But this is Lent right now!”

Student: “But that isn’t really fasting. You just have to go without meat on Fridays.”

Me. “That’s true, because Catholics wimped out. But many people still go without food on Ash Wednesday.”

Student: “I forgot it was Ash Wednesday” (this was true–on Ash Wednesday I happened to let slip what day it was and she exclaimed that she’d completely forgotten–which was how I knew she was Catholic).

I then explained what Lent was like in the Middle Ages, and also that the Orthodox still fast quite strictly in Lent. I tried to make the point that traditional Christianity did have this kind of discipline, but that modern Western Christianity (especially Protestantism but also to some extent Catholicism) has softened it considerably.

Supposing this student decides some day that she wants a religion with real fasting? Hopefully what I said will remain in her memory to remind her that she can find this within Christianity. But it’s quite possible–at least in northern New Jersey–that she’ll see Islam as the primary candidate for a rigorous, demanding religion that orders every aspect of her life. I don’t know if this student wants any such thing (I rather think she doesn’t). But I don’t marvel (though I grieve) that those who do want this so often are drawn to Islam.

And yes, I did explain that Muslims can eat all they want after sundown. But the students were still impressed with the idea of going all day without food.

Edwin


#5

I’m not expert, but I would say people are attracted to Islams societal rejection of the perverse. While killing Christians, and oppressing people is deplorable, I think that is overlooked by people as something not in the mainstream anyway. The way Muslims live hating sin is admirable. No strip clubs, no bars, no hookers, adultery is a serious crime. I mean people deep down are drawn to that kind of righteousness of their societies.

The West and our freedoms are great, but at times I also think we have really let certain freedoms go over the top. Of course abortion, pronography, gambling. I mean this things are inherently bad and destructive, but I can order a XXX hardcore porno movie from my local cable provider, I can go to Jersey and lose my house. At times it seems like the western world is lost. We glorify things that shouldn’t be people seem to love money in this country more than anything. people work and work, make more and more, yet America leads the way in miserable souls. I think people sometimes just get disenfranchised by our culture in the west.

I don’t know, I would guess that’s the attraction.


#6

[quote=Mike_D30]I’m not expert, but I would say people are attracted to Islams societal rejection of the perverse. While killing Christians, and oppressing people is deplorable, I think that is overlooked by people as something not in the mainstream anyway. The way Muslims live hating sin is admirable. No strip clubs, no bars, no hookers, adultery is a serious crime. I mean people deep down are drawn to that kind of righteousness of their societies.

The West and our freedoms are great, but at times I also think we have really let certain freedoms go over the top. Of course abortion, pronography, gambling. I mean this things are inherently bad and destructive, but I can order a XXX hardcore porno movie from my local cable provider, I can go to Jersey and lose my house. At times it seems like the western world is lost. We glorify things that shouldn’t be people seem to love money in this country more than anything. people work and work, make more and more, yet America leads the way in miserable souls. I think people sometimes just get disenfranchised by our culture in the west.

I don’t know, I would guess that’s the attraction.
[/quote]

well, yes that is partly true… this is nothing against Christianity or against any other religion but if you look at all the supposed Christians or supposed Muslims …you would know that in general Muslims are more devout and less likely to fall into temptations…
people ask me how I live in this society and don’t drink, have sex, fast, pray 5 times a day, etc… and for me its not that hard because there are people who are more devout than me…
i think people get tired of that party, sex, sinful lifestyle and then they open up and find the beauty within Islam.


#7

Simplicity of doctrine is usually one of the key selling points. It is human nature to be more open to things that don’t require much explanation and that you can easily wrap your mind around.


#8

[quote=Muslim]well, yes that is partly true… this is nothing against Christianity or against any other religion but if you look at all the supposed Christians or supposed Muslims …you would know that in general Muslims are more devout and less likely to fall into temptations…
people ask me how I live in this society and don’t drink, have sex, fast, pray 5 times a day, etc… and for me its not that hard because there are people who are more devout than me…
i think people get tired of that party, sex, sinful lifestyle and then they open up and find the beauty within Islam.
[/quote]

Well I think a lot of has to do with Muslim nations restrictions on personal liberties. If Islamic lands had to deal with freedom of speech, secularism, etc… they would be dealing with the same societal ills. A free society has its advantages and draw backs, we can’t enforce morality on people like they do in Islamic countries.

I’m Catholic I don’t drink, smoke, sexually sin (masturbation every once in a while, but I confess it as a sin), or gamble, I pray morning prayers, evening prayers, prayer before meals etc… I fast during Lent. What I’m saying is people in the West convert to Islam as a rejection of what western secularist societies (not necesarily Christian, as most of Europe are NOT practicing Christians at all, but non religious secular humanists) have told them they need to make their priorities sex, money, and live for the moment attitude. I think people look at Islam as a means of rejecting the perversion pushed down their throat from the liberal movements in secular countries like France, Britain, and the USA.


#9

[quote=Mike_D30]Well I think a lot of has to do with Muslim nations restrictions on personal liberties. If Islamic lands had to deal with freedom of speech, secularism, etc… they would be dealing with the same societal ills. A free society has its advantages and draw backs, we can’t enforce morality on people like they do in Islamic countries.

I’m Catholic I don’t drink, smoke, sexually sin (masturbation every once in a while, but I confess it as a sin), or gamble, I pray morning prayers, evening prayers, prayer before meals etc… I fast during Lent. What I’m saying is people in the West convert to Islam as a rejection of what western secularist societies (not necesarily Christian, as most of Europe are NOT practicing Christians at all, but non religious secular humanists) have told them they need to make their priorities sex, money, and live for the moment attitude. I think people look at Islam as a means of rejecting the perversion pushed down their throat from the liberal movements in secular countries like France, Britain, and the USA.
[/quote]

well thats one of the things that most people say is that Islamic countries dont have any freedom, etc… thats not true… look at all the big and major Muslim countries…ALL of them are secular.
Iran has like maybe 3% of all of Muslims Population… Afghanistan has like 1%…
and i am talking about Muslims in the West versus “Christians” in the West.and I do agree that most of them are Christians by name only.in general Muslims in the West are more devout than “Christians”… but if you compare all the Muslims versus all the devout Christians…they are equal…you know what I am trying to say…oh i know why most people here are blind now :wink:


#10

It sounds like they were more culturally catholic. With zero catechesis your cousin would be prey to almost any cult. This unfortunately happens all to often.

Why Islam? Well why Pentecostal, Scientologist, Jehovah’s Witness. or pick a cult. They need approval. Often are insecure. They are love bombed by a group. Offered acceptance at the price of total surrender. They are not encouraged to think or carefully consider what they are getting into. If they try to leave, if it’s Islam, then they can be injured or killed. Some are fascinated by the “other” or anything different. Some want 4 wives and total control over others. Some are alienated and want to show it. Remember John Walker our homegrown Taliban.

Pray for him that he might realize the error he is trapped in and have the strength to get out and return to the truth. This is why I always advise people to not marry Muslims.


#11

[quote=cestusdei]It sounds like they were more culturally catholic. With zero catechesis your cousin would be prey to almost any cult. This unfortunately happens all to often.

Why Islam? Well why Pentecostal, Scientologist, Jehovah’s Witness. or pick a cult. They need approval. Often are insecure. They are love bombed by a group. Offered acceptance at the price of total surrender. They are not encouraged to think or carefully consider what they are getting into. If they try to leave, if it’s Islam, then they can be injured or killed. Some are fascinated by the “other” or anything different. Some want 4 wives and total control over others. Some are alienated and want to show it. Remember John Walker our homegrown Taliban.

Pray for him that he might realize the error he is trapped in and have the strength to get out and return to the truth. This is why I always advise people to not marry Muslims.
[/quote]

ahh man… i love you…you make me laugh with your idiotic and ignorant comments… thanks man!


#12

I had a neighbor that was muslim, frankly her prayer life was the only thing I found attractive about Islam. Her husband and her fought all the time and violently, he tried to kill her many times. When they were fighting he would say I divorce you, which apparently is all that is needed to be divorced. When he decided he wanted her back he would just come back, she didn’t have a choice. The family forced the daughters to marry muslim men that they chose, the oldest daughter was in college and almost done when they forced her to marry, new husband made her drop out. What a shame, for such prayerfull people to be so violent and the men to not cherish their wives, but to treat them like property…it was almost like a willful child throwing a temper tantrum to watch these men. One minute he is trying to kill his toy, and tosses it out, the next he is grabbing it back and saying mine!


#13

he met the Pakistani Muslim girl who is going to be his wife now

Well, that could be a big part of the attraction.

Judging by the case of Abdul Rahman, a problem could arise if he should later decide to convert back to Christianity, or to any other religion.


#14

My own opinion is that a Catholic converting to Islam can rationalize, right off the bat, that they’re worshipping the same God in Islam, as in Catholicism. Of course, I disagree with that.

One thing that may attract people to Islam is the devotion of its adherents. I think “Muslim” above was saying that many Muslims are half-hearted, although it doesn’t look like that to us in the West. What we see in the daily devotion.

I was in Wash DC once and went by the Saudi embassy at one of the prayer times, and there were Muslims worshipping out on the street. That devotion is impressive.

I wish Catholics were *half * as devout, and they should be *even more devout * than Muslims with Catholicism’s belief in the Real Presence.

The documentaries about Islam on TV say that there is no “vatican” style centralization in Islam, as in Catholicism. So, Muslims argue about interpretations of the Koran all the time. And, every one is entitled to have their own interpretation of the Koran, although you may be taking your chances somewhat. Even still, you can see that Islam is quite cohesive, from West Africa eastward to Malaysia.

So, I suspect that Catholics that become Muslim aren’t thinking too much, and they are attracted by the intrigue and rock-hard fundamentalism. They want that external control of their lives.

Islam also adheres to Pelagianism – you are responsible for your own salvation. That makes sense, because Islam arose around the height of the Pelagian heresy in Christianity. So, there’s several things going on here with that. 1) Converts must feel edified that they are in charge of saving themselves, rather than acknowledging the sovereignty of God in this matter, as does Christianity. That’s a bit odd, to begin with, isn’t it? – to think that we can tell God that we deserve to be saved? 2) Islam rejects that Christ was a savior. So, immediately you need to be your own savior. This is part of what bystanders can’t imagine, when they see a fellow Christian adopt Islam.

Anybody who says the world’s religions are all the same just isn’t thinking very much, in my opinion.

Aside from Muslim militancy, I think there are aspects of Islam which are very egalitarian (“everybody’s equal”). Islam developed with a rejection of the “hierarchy” that is so characteristic of Catholicism. At the annual Hajj in Mecca, people “dress down” so that the economic differences between them are somewhat minimized. That’s one of the “feel good” aspects of Islam.

The PBS two-hour series on Islam (got it from my public library) shows a very sympathetic view of the people. Muslims invented the “check” so that money could be easily transported long distances. They were accomplished in architecture and other aspects of culture. They were more advanced than Europe during the middle ages. The exchange of ideas during the Hajj between people that lived far apart brought progress very quickly to far-flung areas of the Muslim sphere.

Certainly no Christian should give sway to any tendency to de-humanize Muslim people. No, no, no.


#15

attraction towards islam, is basically, due to it’s pure monotheistic charecteristic. it remained unaltered. muslims took lot of trouble to protect. they forgive no one. they forgive not even their family members if they were found guilty of interfering God’s oneness. oneness in islam is not just a belief that God is one. nay, it has deepest implications. it is this oneness that whole philosophy of islam is based on.

for a long time, i didn’t realise why oneness is so important.

so far i don’t see any ohter faith, which is so simple, clear & touch all departments of human life. here u don’t have to waste books upon books, hours upon hours to explain your foolish incestuous Trinity idea, which is ur own, btw.

this, in my view is greater attraction for islam.

the keywords: simplicity & workable solution to all human needs. what else a human want when he opened his eyes in this world. i think God did fulfill his duty thru islam.


#16

[quote=ashok]so far i don’t see any ohter faith, which is so simple, clear & touch all departments of human life. here u don’t have to waste books upon books, hours upon hours to explain your foolish incestuous Trinity idea, which is ur own, btw…
[/quote]

Can’t you answer the question without assaulting our faith with such rude commets? I’m sorry but the way Muslims explain Jesus is not so simple, in fact not simple at all. Nor is the idea of the Kabah that is prayed to and worshipped, which was also worshipped by pagans, yet your religion remains non-idolatorous. Islam isn’t as simple as you make it out to be.


#17

[quote=Mike_D30]Can’t you answer the question without assaulting our faith with such rude commets? I’m sorry but the way Muslims explain Jesus is not so simple, in fact not simple at all. Nor is the idea of the Kabah that is prayed to and worshipped, which was also worshipped by pagans, yet your religion remains non-idolatorous. Islam isn’t as simple as you make it out to be.
[/quote]

Nameste mike,

u mean only people like injesus & jerry falwell & pat robertson, should have a right to critisise others’ faith with more insulting comments than mine?

what a hypocritical attitude have u (likes of injesus & jerry falwell, pat robertson) got?

let me clear up one thing there, mike.

criticising the very faith is one thing, & criticising what ppl. believe due to the later innovations is another.

critcising statements such as “my Father, who is God of u, me & all is Greater than u me and all of us” is one thing. & criticising “if Jesus is not risen from the dead our faith is worthless” is another.

criticising “Hear O jews, our Lord God is ONE” is one thing. & criticising “u r the christ killers, u r the killers of our Saviour, now embrace christianity or die” is totally another.

as much as much ppl. like injesus, jerry falwell & pat robertson have a right to exhibit their foolishness to the fullest, others too have every right to criticise with full rational justification.

when i hear sentiments like urs, it affirm my faith in the neccessity of a fair wider research of every issue & aspect of all relgions. now, don’t be surprised why i like Dr. zakir Naik. it was actually the behaviour of ppl. like injesus, who lead me to listen carefully what others have to say. in the process i even learned what in fact my Hinduism was in the initial stage in Vedic period of India. until then i had a meaningless faith, mere faith with no true justification. i was a Hindu just b’cause i was born in a Hindu family. now i realise this type of faith, is not neccessarily a true faith.

as far ur question "Muslims…

cont////


#18

as far ur question “Muslims expalin Jesus is not so simple, in fact not simple at all”:

it depends upon ur approach. if u already decided that ur faith is the only true faith & then study other faith with this attitude, then there is no way that u will find simplicity in all other non christian faiths. b’cause u have already decided not to accept others’ view no matter what it takes

if u leave aside ur inherited faith while u study & examine others’ faith objectively & rationally, then it is possible that u will find islam very very simple & easy to grasp, even a child with basic common sense can understand.

the kabaa issue that u raised, is meaningless. it is like blowing a non issue out of proportion. why? b’cause the opponents of islam till now found no genuine issue in islam to defame it.

kabaa is merely a house of worship to God. just like any other mosque. there r no idols in it. for muslims, it’s importance is merely due to being a first place of worship in the history of the world/earth built by first man when he appeared first time on the face of this earth. muslims say it was prophet Adam.

obviously there has to be some initial point to begin the idea of unity in whole human race & to worship ONE true God. for muslims it is symbol of unity. not all muslims get chance to go there. b’cause it is not required at all for all. it is only for those who can afford. otherwise a simple belief is enuff that Hadjj is b’cause of Kabaa being a first blessed place where first man began & laid down the foundation of ONE and ONLY TRUE GOD’s UNITY.

if this place (kabaa) happened to be in Mecca’s valley Becca, it is not strange at all. what if this place was in America or japan? in that case question would still remain why japan & why not arabia or italy?

thus it was this simplicity of islam that i even found my own Vedas & in jews’ skriptures & in the gospels. here too i see light of ONENESS of our GOD. but u ppl r lost in the mythology created by ppl who came later such as Paul in the west who almost destroy all the valuable efforts of Jesus. for jessus, the keyword was not his kinship or any other artificial relationship that gives man real peace in this life and in the afterlife, it is actually realisation of ONENESS of ONE TRUE GOD & then following His requirments. but Paul destroy this very key rquirement.

so if i criticise Paul with harsh words, i am not critisisng Jesus. I am in fact praising Jesus by condemning his enemy- paul.

Paul is the actual traitor. Jesus message was & is clear. Dr. zakir Naik cleared this issue with his simple straight logic. he even helped me understand the core issue of my own Vedas. the Koran is right in saying “for every nation, there was a warner”. and there must have been warners otherwise God’s test cannot be justified if all ppl on earth were not warned.

but after the advent of Great and Last Maha-Rishi, Mohamed, who was foretold in all major religions’ skriptures, there is no more need of any new Rishi b’cause Islam carries everything that is needed by man to have peace on this earth & in the afterlife. that’s why muslims don’t forgive anyone who tries to change their religion, even if their family member. b’cause islam is the last hope & final version of God’s Will.

islam is simple, straight and full code for all essential departments of human life.


#19

[quote=ashok]Nameste mike,

u mean only people like injesus & jerry falwell & pat robertson, should have a right to critisise others’ faith with more insulting comments than mine?

what a hypocritical attitude have u (likes of injesus & jerry falwell, pat robertson) got?

let me clear up one thing there, mike.

criticising the very faith is one thing, & criticising what ppl. believe due to the later innovations is another.

critcising statements such as “my Father, who is God of u, me & all is Greater than u me and all of us” is one thing. & criticising “if Jesus is not risen from the dead our faith is worthless” is another.

criticising “Hear O jews, our Lord God is ONE” is one thing. & criticising “u r the christ killers, u r the killers of our Saviour, now embrace christianity or die” is totally another.

as much as much ppl. like injesus, jerry falwell & pat robertson have a right to exhibit their foolishness to the fullest, others too have every right to criticise with full rational justification.

when i hear sentiments like urs, it affirm my faith in the neccessity of a fair wider research of every issue & aspect of all relgions. now, don’t be surprised why i like Dr. zakir Naik. it was actually the behaviour of ppl. like injesus, who lead me to listen carefully what others have to say. in the process i even learned what in fact my Hinduism was in the initial stage in Vedic period of India. until then i had a meaningless faith, mere faith with no true justification. i was a Hindu just b’cause i was born in a Hindu family. now i realise this type of faith, is not neccessarily a true faith.

as far ur question "Muslims…

cont////
[/quote]

You come onto a Christian board, call our most sacred belief system “foolish incestuous Trinity idea”, and you’re comparing ME to Jerry Falwell?

Oh man, I can’t be the only one seeing the irony in this. This thread was going well, until you stepped foot in here, perhaps it would return to civility if you were to leave it? And take your insulting degrading attitude with you…


#20

people can be attracted to all kind of things whether islam, buddhism, atheism, satanism ecc…it depends on the personality of the person…not all people who convert to other faith stay in that faith…i know of many who converted to islam and left later…it’s all subjective…i had 2 muslim brothers with me at school who were attracted to Christianity and Christians ( we were 13 !)…they always stuck in Christian neighberhood with Christian friends and they eventually converted and changed names…i know a guy who converted for business : he worked as muhallil, the guy who marries a divorced woman in order that she can go back to her first husband…but he left later…some others in order to divorce but reverted again…and of course there are those who are attracted for something they find beautiful in it…it’s all subjective.


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