Awkward family problem: engagement of divorcees


#1

My brother, a divorcee, has just gotten engaged to a lady, who is also divorced.

He, a Catholic, did not pursue an annulment for his marriage (I don't think he was interested in seeking to obtain one - he has had plenty of time to do so). The lady he is engaged to is a divorced Protestant. Both had unfortunate marriages: my brother married foolishly and the marriage failed, whilst his new lady's husband left her and her two kids for another woman.

I am not sure what to say to my brother. I can't congratulate him, despite that being the expectation of my parents, who I live with. My other siblings have congratulated him.

Next weekend, they will visit the family home, and I will have to say something. :shrug:

There could be a big row if I don't congratulate them, yet what else can I say to them both?

I spoke to a priest and he said that I could affirm with my brother that I love him, but because of my beliefs I cannot support what he is about to do. I would also offer my prayers. But what can I say to the lady?

I have to say something when they walk into the house. I can't just pretend it hasn't happened. They won't be open to any counsel from me so I'd be wasting my time with that.

I have decided not to go to the registration ceremony, but the priest said I could go to the meal afterwards, as Jesus ate with sinners... Whether I'd be welcome to the meal is another matter.

There is a possibility that I might 'lose' my brother if I do what is right by my Catholic faith. Whether I 'had' him in the first place if that happens, would be another question.


#2

Very hard circumstance and I understand well, as my own sister is in the same situation with her third husband.

The advice the priest gave you is good. First and foremost, love your brother and his new wife. Love means that we decide to be there for them even when our heart is heavy. But, to allow any work of the Holy Spirit within you, your relationship to them must not be hindered with these open misgivings.

You should also, whenever you can, encourage your brother to seek the counsel of a priest or deacon for advice on getting a Decree of Nullity. If both wish to be practicing Catholics, they must do this in order to be in communion with the church. It is quite possible, given your post regarding their previous marriages, that obtaining an annulment may be easier than they think. It is never a "cake-walk", but there is often the case where things go a lot better than originally thought.

Peace.


#3

3675864: You are not wrong in not congratulating him.Why not say the same to her?You are in no way hurting her by stating your opinion.If you lose your brother he's being unreasonable.After a time he will see his error and tell you he"s sorry for not respecting your opinion.


#4

[quote="prstoessel, post:2, topic:234094"]
Very hard circumstance and I understand well, as my own sister is in the same situation with her third husband.

The advice the priest gave you is good. First and foremost, love your brother and his new wife. Love means that we decide to be there for them even when our heart is heavy. *But, to allow any work of the Holy Spirit within you, your relationship to them must not be hindered with these open misgivings. *

You should also, whenever you can, encourage your brother to seek the counsel of a priest or deacon for advice on getting a Decree of Nullity. If both wish to be practicing Catholics, they must do this in order to be in communion with the church. It is quite possible, given your post regarding their previous marriages, that obtaining an annulment may be easier than they think. It is never a "cake-walk", but there is often the case where things go a lot better than originally thought.

Peace.

[/quote]

I'm not sure I understand what you mean by the bit in bold - could you explain it for me please?

The other thing is, my brother has had several ears to seek an annulment, yet he never bothered to try and obtain one, even though I had grounds for thinking he may indeed be granted one. The new girl is not a Catholic, but an Anglican, as was my brother's first wife.

[quote="valentino, post:3, topic:234094"]
3675864: You are not wrong in not congratulating him.Why not say the same to her?You are in no way hurting her by stating your opinion.If you lose your brother he's being unreasonable.After a time he will see his error and tell you he"s sorry for not respecting your opinion.

[/quote]

Perhaps. There could be wider fall out though, so any friction could be shared across the family, with me painted as the 'bad guy'. :shrug:


#5

[quote="3675864, post:1, topic:234094"]
My brother, a divorcee, has just gotten engaged to a lady, who is also divorced.

He, a Catholic, did not pursue an annulment for his marriage (I don't think he was interested in seeking to obtain one - he has had plenty of time to do so). The lady he is engaged to is a divorced Protestant. Both had unfortunate marriages: my brother married foolishly and the marriage failed, whilst his new lady's husband left her and her two kids for another woman.

I am not sure what to say to my brother. I can't congratulate him, despite that being the expectation of my parents, who I live with. My other siblings have congratulated him.

Next weekend, they will visit the family home, and I will have to say something. :shrug:

There could be a big row if I don't congratulate them, yet what else can I say to them both?

I spoke to a priest and he said that I could affirm with my brother that I love him, but because of my beliefs I cannot support what he is about to do. I would also offer my prayers. But what can I say to the lady?

I have to say something when they walk into the house. I can't just pretend it hasn't happened. They won't be open to any counsel from me so I'd be wasting my time with that.

I have decided not to go to the registration ceremony, but the priest said I could go to the meal afterwards, as Jesus ate with sinners... Whether I'd be welcome to the meal is another matter.

There is a possibility that I might 'lose' my brother if I do what is right by my Catholic faith. Whether I 'had' him in the first place if that happens, would be another question.

[/quote]

The thing is, your brother is not lost forever. He's just lost right now. There may be a time in the future when he "gets it" and fixes it. And he and his future wife can do that. But understand that (IMOHO) this will not happen if he is alienated or otherwise harassed.

You can support him without condoning what he is doing. You can explain to him that you love him, but don't approve of what he is doing or the way he is doing it and tell him WHY. Show him the CCC and explain why you are worried about him and her. Explain that you would love to see him married to his future wife, but pray that he would follow the rules of the Church and get the annulments first. But all that won't happen if you don't get through to him.

If you already know that he will reject everything you say, that means that he knows and chooses not to follow those rules. But again, that doesn't mean that he won't fix it later. Even if it means that he won't listen to you at all right now, he may listen to you if you encourage him to fix it later. But I promise, I strongly feel that he won't listen to you at all if you alienate him. No one likes to be told what to do, no one likes demands to be made of them, and I don't know anyone who invites people to poke their nose in their life and their life decisions.This is a consenting adult with knowledge of your opinions. So if you handle it with care, you can help him fix this later.

I would not come out and congratulate him. But I would be cordial, inviting, and supportive to both of them. I would treat them both the same. I wouldn't say anything to one that I wouldn't say to the other. I would accept her as your brother's mate and pray for them both that they fix this error that they are going to make. I'm sure that there is something else you can say besides "congratulations on your big mistake, I hope you fix it later". You might say, 'congratulations, I am happy you found someone to share the rest of your life" and then when you have the opportunity, start encouraging him to fix it and be in communion with the Church.

But I would encourage you to make sure he doesn't feel like you are judging him, looking down on him, or forcing your opinion on him. Because he's going to get married to this woman. So you can only move forward, not look back.

Just my OHO.... it seems like you're standing alone, and you can only do so much alone...


#6

[quote="3675864, post:4, topic:234094"]
I'm not sure I understand what you mean by the bit in bold - could you explain it for me please?

[/quote]

Sure. What I mean is, even with what you know about his circumstance, you must love him (and her). If you are withdrawn or not inclined to be a part of their lives, that becomes a hinderance to your ability to discuss this at all with your brother. In my case with my sister, I still attended her wedding even though it was not in the church. I still gave my love and support, even though she knew I was not in approval of the path she chose. I try to keep myself as close as I can to her so I can continue to be witness and show her the right path. Being outwardly unsupportive rarely achieves the desired effect.

We cannot take their hands and pull them to the right path, but we can keep the lantern lit and walk as close as we can to them in hopes they see the right path.

The other thing is, my brother has had several ears to seek an annulment, yet he never bothered to try and obtain one, even though I had grounds for thinking he may indeed be granted one. The new girl is not a Catholic, but an Anglican, as was my brother's first wife.

Most of the time, folks do not bother with an annulment until they're ready to get married again. Kind of like not seeing the doctor until we have something that's really bothering us. Is he going to church and receiving Holy Communion? Does he seem to act as though his faith is important to him? Was his first marriage in the Catholic Church?


#7

[quote="prstoessel, post:6, topic:234094"]
Sure. What I mean is, even with what you know about his circumstance, you must love him (and her). If you are withdrawn or not inclined to be a part of their lives, that becomes a hinderance to your ability to discuss this at all with your brother. In my case with my sister, I still attended her wedding even though it was not in the church. I still gave my love and support, even though she knew I was not in approval of the path she chose. I try to keep myself as close as I can to her so I can continue to be witness and show her the right path. Being outwardly unsupportive rarely achieves the desired effect.

We cannot take their hands and pull them to the right path, but we can keep the lantern lit and walk as close as we can to them in hopes they see the right path.

Most of the time, folks do not bother with an annulment until they're ready to get married again. Kind of like not seeing the doctor until we have something that's really bothering us. Is he going to church and receiving Holy Communion? Does he seem to act as though his faith is important to him? Was his first marriage in the Catholic Church?

[/quote]

His first marriage was in the Anglican church with a dispensation from the Catholic Church. That marriage failed and he divorced and is now marrying a girl whose own marriage went bad when her own husband left her and the kids for another woman.

My immediate problems are thus:

  1. What do I say at the weekend when they arrive? My local trusted priest said I cannot congratulate them. Can I wish them all the best? Or do I just act like nothing has happened? I could do that, but it might be a little odd.

  2. There will be a meal this coming weekend to celebrate. Do I attend? Or do I be, in the words of my mother, an 'odd-ball' by not attending? My mother snapped at me today when I said that I couldn't congratulate them. It's like my own parents are blaming me for being the bad guy when it is my brother who is doing what he is doing. My mother said she'd be quite happy if I was doing what my brother was doing... I said it was adultery and my mother said 'No it's not!'

Maybe silence and ignoring the development might be the best way? Just act like nothing has happened. Then when the invites come out, then I can explain my position? Right now, I have good reason to believe that any 'pontificating' or 'preaching' from me would be unwelcome. They just don't want to know. The way my mother was talking, you'd think I was the one about to do something that is, actually, morally wrong.


#8

[quote="3675864, post:7, topic:234094"]

  1. What do I say at the weekend when they arrive? My local trusted priest said I cannot congratulate them. Can I wish them all the best? Or do I just act like nothing has happened? I could do that, but it might be a little odd.

[/quote]

Why not tell her "Welcome to the family!"? Tell them both that you are praying for them and hope they will be very happy.

[quote="3675864, post:7, topic:234094"]

  1. There will be a meal this coming weekend to celebrate. Do I attend? Or do I be, in the words of my mother, an 'odd-ball' by not attending?

[/quote]

You stated earlier that your priest has advised you it would be acceptable to attend the reception/dinner after the ceremony. If that is OK, I don't see why this family dinner should be unaccepatble.

A few other thoughts:

You mention that you still live at home, while your brother has been married previously. I'm guessing you may be quite a bit younger than he is. Fairly or unfairly, that probably makes it more difficult for him to accept much advice from you about how he should live his life.

This Ask an Apologist thread may be helpful to you as well
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=167154


#9

[quote="Thomas63116, post:8, topic:234094"]
Why not tell her "Welcome to the family!"? Tell them both that you are praying for them and hope they will be very happy.

You stated earlier that your priest has advised you it would be acceptable to attend the reception/dinner after the ceremony. If that is OK, I don't see why this family dinner should be unaccepatble.

A few other thoughts:

You mention that you still live at home, while your brother has been married previously. I'm guessing you may be quite a bit younger than he is. Fairly or unfairly, that probably makes it more difficult for him to accept much advice from you about how he should live his life.

This Ask an Apologist thread may be helpful to you as well
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=167154

[/quote]

yes I am younger than him by about 10 years!

That link didn't really help. It is quite confusing.

My brother will essentially be entering into an adulterous and invalid marriage, therefore I cannot attend, and it would seem from that thread that I should not go to the meal afterwards either. By extension, I cannot go to the meal this coming weekend either!

I could just play dead or something!:o


#10

[quote="3675864, post:7, topic:234094"]
His first marriage was in the Anglican church with a dispensation from the Catholic Church. That marriage failed and he divorced and is now marrying a girl whose own marriage went bad when her own husband left her and the kids for another woman.

My immediate problems are thus:

  1. What do I say at the weekend when they arrive? My local trusted priest said I cannot congratulate them. Can I wish them all the best? Or do I just act like nothing has happened? I could do that, but it might be a little odd.

  2. There will be a meal this coming weekend to celebrate. Do I attend? Or do I be, in the words of my mother, an 'odd-ball' by not attending? My mother snapped at me today when I said that I couldn't congratulate them. It's like my own parents are blaming me for being the bad guy when it is my brother who is doing what he is doing. My mother said she'd be quite happy if I was doing what my brother was doing... I said it was adultery and my mother said 'No it's not!'

Maybe silence and ignoring the development might be the best way? Just act like nothing has happened. Then when the invites come out, then I can explain my position? Right now, I have good reason to believe that any 'pontificating' or 'preaching' from me would be unwelcome. They just don't want to know. The way my mother was talking, you'd think I was the one about to do something that is, actually, morally wrong.

[/quote]

I am sorry you are in this difficult situation. Do you have like-minded friends who can support you? I don't mean to say you should invite friends to help you catechise your family, but rather that you might rely on conversing with trusted friends to help remind you of why you hold the position you do and why you must behave a certain way because of that.

My advice for your immediate problems is this:

  1. Greet her as you would a platonic female friend of your brother's. If you find you must comment on their relationship, try to refer to it as a friendship. Has your brother told you/your parents any completely moral thing about her that's not incredibly personal? If so, you could greet her with something like "Hi, it's nice to meet you. (Your brother's name) told me about (her career, or her dog, or whatever)." If you can befriend her without giving blatant approval to the relationship, you will be in a better position to catechise her and your brother, and also to not bring a ton of disapproval down on you from the rest of the family. However, I agree with the priest. No words of congratulations or approval should come from you. "All the best" would likely be taken in a different way from what you mean, so I wouldn't say that either. If someone makes a big deal out of it, and asks you why you won't say "congratulations", you can try to evade by saying that you're not comfortable explaining or that your reasons are private. If that someone pushes it, or that someone would have a right to know (like your brother or his lady-friend) try to put it off to a more private moment. If that person gives you no option but to explain (which would be extremely rude and disruptive, but some people are like that), then say a quick prayer for strength and guidance and try your best to explain without condemning. Something like: "I'm Catholic, and we presume all marriages to be valid and sacred. My brother hasn't sought an annulment, so I believe, in accordance with the Church, that his previous marriage is still valid (or that he is still married). Because of that, I can't condone this relationship, although I do very much wish that he be happy." If it comes to such a statement, I would avoid mentioning the girl's sin in relation to the situation unless someone asks. She is Anglican, and because they plan to marry in the Anglican church, she is actually under no obligation to seek an annulment from the Catholic church. It's still a sin on her part, but you would only offend her more since there's no way she believes it's a sin.

  2. Your attendance to the meal would depend, in my opinion, on how it's being presented. Is it a formal 'engagement party' or 'engagement dinner'? If so, I would not attend, despite being the odd-ball. If it is not actually a celebration of the engagement, but rather would have been held regardless of the relationship (because your brother is visiting or because the family is together) then by all means, attend.

What is a registration ceremony?

Concerning losing your brother, we are called to forsake all for God. It's easier said than done, I know, but we are called to the highest standard of moral action. It might help you to meditate on Matthew 10:21-22:
[BIBLEDRB]Matthew 10:21-22[/BIBLEDRB]

It's unfortunate, but it's because of sin that this must happen. Jesus also said to pluck out your eye or cut off your hand if it causes you to sin. It's so difficult, but it must be done. You are in my prayers, and please let us know how it goes.


#11

I just read the CUF link from the above link - cuf.org/faithfacts/details_view.asp?ffID=137

I'm now more confused than ever.

As I see it, if I don't attend the registry office ceremony, I will risk demonisation. I may not be welcome to the meal after even if I wish to attend.

If I do choose to attend the ceremony or the meal after, I affirm the couple in what they are doing.


#12

[quote="k8e308, post:10, topic:234094"]
I am sorry you are in this difficult situation. Do you have like-minded friends who can support you? I don't mean to say you should invite friends to help you catechise your family, but rather that you might rely on conversing with trusted friends to help remind you of why you hold the position you do and why you must behave a certain way because of that.

My advice for your immediate problems is this:

  1. Greet her as you would a platonic female friend of your brother's. If you find you must comment on their relationship, try to refer to it as a friendship. Has your brother told you/your parents any completely moral thing about her that's not incredibly personal? If so, you could greet her with something like "Hi, it's nice to meet you. (Your brother's name) told me about (her career, or her dog, or whatever)." If you can befriend her without giving blatant approval to the relationship, you will be in a better position to catechise her and your brother, and also to not bring a ton of disapproval down on you from the rest of the family. However, I agree with the priest. No words of congratulations or approval should come from you. "All the best" would likely be taken in a different way from what you mean, so I wouldn't say that either. If someone makes a big deal out of it, and asks you why you won't say "congratulations", you can try to evade by saying that you're not comfortable explaining or that your reasons are private. If that someone pushes it, or that someone would have a right to know (like your brother or his lady-friend) try to put it off to a more private moment. If that person gives you no option but to explain (which would be extremely rude and disruptive, but some people are like that), then say a quick prayer for strength and guidance and try your best to explain without condemning. Something like: "I'm Catholic, and we presume all marriages to be valid and sacred. My brother hasn't sought an annulment, so I believe, in accordance with the Church, that his previous marriage is still valid (or that he is still married). Because of that, I can't condone this relationship, although I do very much wish that he be happy." If it comes to such a statement, I would avoid mentioning the girl's sin in relation to the situation unless someone asks. She is Anglican, and because they plan to marry in the Anglican church, she is actually under no obligation to seek an annulment from the Catholic church. It's still a sin on her part, but you would only offend her more since there's no way she believes it's a sin.

  2. Your attendance to the meal would depend, in my opinion, on how it's being presented. Is it a formal 'engagement party' or 'engagement dinner'? If so, I would not attend, despite being the odd-ball. If it is not actually a celebration of the engagement, but rather would have been held regardless of the relationship (because your brother is visiting or because the family is together) then by all means, attend.

What is a registration ceremony?

Concerning losing your brother, we are called to forsake all for God. It's easier said than done, I know, but we are called to the highest standard of moral action. It might help you to meditate on Matthew 10:21-22:
[BIBLEDRB]Matthew 10:21-22[/BIBLEDRB]

It's unfortunate, but it's because of sin that this must happen. Jesus also said to pluck out your eye or cut off your hand if it causes you to sin. It's so difficult, but it must be done. You are in my prayers, and please let us know how it goes.

[/quote]

Thanks. My family close ranks with each other - my compliance is expected. I am very much alone and don't really have any close friends nearby who I can call upon.

A registration ceremony is like a civil registration in a registry office. We have them in the UK and Ireland. It's a civil 'marriage' ceremony.

I met the girl before. She hugged me at a family baptism a while back. So I think she would expect my best wishes on her 'good news' and hugs... But I can't hug her because of this latest news.

My parents just want my brother to be 'happy', even if that means proceeding as he intends. I would be an unpleasant reminder that this is not a morally correct course, and hence made out to be the bad guy - the judgemental one.


#13

I have just finished reading that article and the Apologist thread above. From those, it seems clear that you should not attend the ceremony. If you feel comfortable, write a letter to your brother explaining your reasons for this, far in advance of the ceremony, if possible. That way, you open the door for him to speak with you and give him time to do so. If you do not think he will discuss it with you, encourage him to see the priest you spoke with or his own priest, if he has one.

You mentioned you are the junior sibling by 10 years; are you also a minor? If you are a minor, I believe you are relieved from moral culpability from attending these events if your parents insist that you do. If you are not, I would not attend, with the possible exception of the dinner this weekend, if it is not officially a celebration of their relationship.


#14

[quote="k8e308, post:13, topic:234094"]
I have just finished reading that article and the Apologist thread above. From those, it seems clear that you should not attend the ceremony. If you feel comfortable, write a letter to your brother explaining your reasons for this, far in advance of the ceremony, if possible. That way, you open the door for him to speak with you and give him time to do so. If you do not think he will discuss it with you, encourage him to see the priest you spoke with or his own priest, if he has one.

You mentioned you are the junior sibling by 10 years; are you also a minor? If you are a minor, I believe you are relieved from moral culpability from attending these events if your parents insist that you do. If you are not, I would not attend, with the possible exception of the dinner this weekend, if it is not officially a celebration of their relationship.

[/quote]

I am nearly 30!

The meal this weekend will be in celebration of the announcement of the engagement. If I don't attend, there will be a lot of anger directed my way by my parents and my brother in particular. It might not be pretty. I don't relish the thought.


#15

[quote="3675864, post:12, topic:234094"]
I met the girl before. She hugged me at a family baptism a while back. So I think she would expect my best wishes on her 'good news' and hugs... But I can't hug her because of this latest news.

My parents just want my brother to be 'happy', even if that means proceeding as he intends. I would be an unpleasant reminder that this is not a morally correct course, and hence made out to be the bad guy - the judgemental one.

[/quote]

If she corners you for your 'best wishes' then ask to speak with her privately. I can see nothing wrong with that. During that conversation, explain your concerns about the relationship. Try to stick only to the problems it presents for your brother, as she is not Catholic.

Are your parents practicing Catholics? If so, try to gently remind them that you are committed to practicing the faith with word and deed, as we are called to do. If they continue to insist that you are wrong, refer them to your priest. If they still make you out to be the bad guy, I would start trying to make plans to move and live independently of them. I know that's drastic, but there are several souls at stake here, and it seems like they don't care.


#16

[quote="3675864, post:14, topic:234094"]
I am nearly 30!

The meal this weekend will be in celebration of the announcement of the engagement. If I don't attend, there will be a lot of anger directed my way by my parents and my brother in particular. It might not be pretty. I don't relish the thought.

[/quote]

Is there any way you might be able to speak to your brother and/or his friend privately before the dinner?


#17

I should also add, that in these difficult times, there are priests who will encourage this kind of behaviour. Then, for people like my brother, it becomes simply a matter of choosing the most favourable opinion among priests - the opinion that suits me and my needs. Thus Catholic faith is distorted and made to be a relative thing, finding the variety or interpretation that suits me best etc...


#18

[quote="3675864, post:17, topic:234094"]
I should also add, that in these difficult times, there are priests who will encourage this kind of behaviour. Then, for people like my brother, it becomes simply a matter of choosing the most favourable opinion among priests - the opinion that suits me and my needs. Thus Catholic faith is distorted and made to be a relative thing, finding the variety or interpretation that suits me best etc...

[/quote]

This is very sad. You could always rely on the Catechism if priests begin to fail to support what you know is right.


#19

[quote="k8e308, post:15, topic:234094"]
If she corners you for your 'best wishes' then ask to speak with her privately. I can see nothing wrong with that. During that conversation, explain your concerns about the relationship. Try to stick only to the problems it presents for your brother, as she is not Catholic.

Are your parents practicing Catholics? If so, try to gently remind them that you are committed to practicing the faith with word and deed, as we are called to do. If they continue to insist that you are wrong, refer them to your priest. If they still make you out to be the bad guy, I would start trying to make plans to move and live independently of them. I know that's drastic, but there are several souls at stake here, and it seems like they don't care.

[/quote]

My family are casual or cultural Catholics. Pix and mix approach. They are not really concerned about salvation, only what makes one 'happy' in this life.

I do actually want to move out, but have no work right now so that is impossible.

[quote="k8e308, post:16, topic:234094"]
Is there any way you might be able to speak to your brother and/or his friend privately before the dinner?

[/quote]

Well, my brother may well tell me where to go if I were to raise anything. It is simply not wanted, I believe. I could try, but it might backfire and could turn nasty. I don't feel close enough to the girl to raise any issues with her.


#20

[quote="3675864, post:19, topic:234094"]
My family are casual or cultural Catholics. Pix and mix approach. They are not really concerned about salvation, only what makes one 'happy' in this life.

I do actually want to move out, but have no work right now so that is impossible.

Well, my brother may well tell me where to go if I were to raise anything. It is simply not wanted, I believe. I could try, but it might backfire and could turn nasty. I don't feel close enough to the girl to raise any issues with her.

[/quote]

That being the case, I would simply decline to attend. It will be incredibly difficult, I understand, and I can't say I've ever been there, so I don't know exactly how hard it will be. I do know that nothing is more difficult than what Christ went through. Try to keep your mind on his Passion while they storm at you for your faith. If they can't understand that you're more concerned with your soul that with anything else, then pray that the Spirit will touch their hearts.

If all else fails, take their arguments and anger silently, but do not allow it to disturb your Peace. When I am torn by the world, I try to just repeat to myself that Jesus is Lord. It's a statement that is Truth, and Light, and Hope, and it calms me.

You say you have no like-minded friends. I am in a similar situation. Is Adoration available to you? Go as often as you can, if so. Spend your leisure time in prayer and meditation. Do all you can to draw closer to God so he can strengthen you. Remember when your family attacks you that you have a Father, Mother, and Brother who would never do so. Remember that they Love you with an everlasting love that cannot be shaken by your actions or anything else.


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