Babies, Communion and Mass


#1

When you go to Mass with your newborn baby and stay at the back behind the doors; when it comes to Communion, do you go up or wait and hope the priest comes to you?

If the baby is asleep when it is time for Communion then fine but what if he is crying, do you still go up?

Thanks.


#2

Go to communion - to recieve the Eucharist, the body and blood of christ that is our salvation. It is showing Him the proper respect. This is not a time to hold back.


#3

[quote="Nelka, post:1, topic:238456"]
When you go to Mass with your newborn baby and stay at the back behind the doors; when it comes to Communion, do you go up or wait and hope the priest comes to you?

If the baby is asleep when it is time for Communion then fine but what if he is crying, do you still go up?

Thanks.

[/quote]

When my children were young I carried them up to the front of the Church and received there (unless a priest, deacon, or EMHC happened to come to where I was.) I imagine I sometimes had to journey from the back of the Church. When carrying a child one must usually receive on the tongue even if that is not what one would otherwise do.

But there were times when a child was being particularly unruly that I would refrain from receiving communion lest the child knock the ciborium out of the hands of the [extraordinary] minister. If it was just crying I'd make a case by case decision based on the needs of the child and the level of distraction that would be caused.


#4

In the past almost three years with two babies we've spent plenty of time at the back of the church, but usually they wouldn't be screaming when we walked up to receive. I think it might be because we were walking up to the front and they were so busy looking at everyone around us.

There was one time at daily Mass when our daughter was in a mood and the priest came back to where I was standing just outside the door and brought me a host, but for us the timing usually has, thankfully, worked out.


#5

Thanks for all the advice.

:tada:


#6

If you are married you could just take turns with your husband, couldn’t you?


#7

Good advice but I forgot to mention that it’s twins. :eek::eek:


#8

We try to sit toward the front so we don't have to move very far. I haven't had a problem carrying my baby and receiving communion. I carry him up against my chest kind of high on my shoulder so I can still put out both hands to receive the host, one under the other. Hasnt been a problem yet, but if he gets too fidgety I would let my husband go first and then pass off the baby to him.


#9

Well that complicates things. Maybe you need a third person? Then you could rotate turns. Do you have any friends that go to the same mass that would be willing to hold a baby long enough to rotate turns?


#10

I always went forward with the babies.

If they were sleeping and roused on the way up to the rail, I could usually just sway as I walked and rock them back to sleep. If they cried, I would just do my best to quiet them and move quickly out if necessary.


#11

I cannot believe the joy my twins have brought me.

[SIGN]Praise the Lord.[/SIGN]


#12

I would be up the front with the baby for most of the Mass. If I’d had to take her out, the priest would usually remember to save me communion for when I got back. I agree with RedSoxWife that a baby who is already crying would often be calmed by the walk up the aisle.

I received on the hand with a small baby (because you can easily shift them up to have both hands free), but on the tongue when she got bigger and now, on the days when she is in the mood to walk calmly next to me, back in the hand. I’ve taken 2 children before and held one in each arm to receive on the tongue, obviously no chalice! Or I’ve had DD in a sling and her friend in my arms, that worked fine.

If you and your husband are both at Mass, would it be possible for one of you to take the non-crying baby to communion at the head of the queue, then return and take the crying baby whilst the other partner is still in time to join the back of the queue for communion?

Otherwise, as you said, you could wait at the back for someone to come to you, but you might need to be proactive about that, e.g. speak to the priest and indicate that you would like for it to happen.


#13

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