Baptism of Child - Parents not Married

Our family has been invited to a baby’s baptism whose parents are not married. The mother of the baby is Catholic.

My question is: Have the requirerements changed OR has it always been that children of unmarried parents can be baptized?

I am all for baptizing the baby. After all, it’s not the baby’s fault that the parents are not married. But then unless the parents are sincere to lead the Catholic life, how can Baptism of their child precede the Sacrament of Marriage?

I am confused. Any good answers? Thank you.

multiple threads on this topic, including on AAA, do a search. short answer, yes, the baby can be baptized even if the parents are not married in the Church.

However, there must be a fervent hope that the baby will be raised Catholic, in the fullest extent intended…so that the child will later be initiated into the other sacraments…Both parents must agree to the baby being baptized as well.

Sacraments alone cannot make a person one or another. If that were the case, our churches should be filled every Sunday. We had a confirmation inscription mass, and the adults in the pews who had been confirmed prior were asked to make a renewal of their baptismal promises…Only 1/2 of those attending mass were confirmed. But they are faithful members of the church??God gifted us all with Free will. Good catechesis, reinforcement in the family, exposure to good role models is what keeps people connected to their faith. especially parental role modeling. Unlike the Pharisees…Jesus called us as written in this weekend’s gospel.

Practice what you preach. You want good & faithful children…then you must become one too. You have an even greater influence than you realize…but plant good seeds

I think it is nice that the baby will be baptized but why are they making it an event and sending invitations? There used to be something said for discretion.

If the two of them can’t see fit to marry even if only legally and not sacramentally they should not be parading around like they are a married couple and having a baptismal to do.

Married people are in a different state, hopefully a state of grace. Non-marrieds who have a child are apparently falling short in that department and while it punishes the child I would not go. Tell them to send you a wedding invitation or announcement and you will change your tune. Dr. Laura said it best why should you treat her honey with anymore respect than she does. he is not her husband and going to the baptism like they are a “couple” is silly.

This is such a predictament. For the sake of the baby we’ll gladly go. I wonder if confronting the parents (who do live together without being married) will do any good.

Hopefully, the priest has given the unmarried couple a good lecture.

I thank all of you for your responses.

Theodora

[quote=stbruno]However, there must be a fervent hope that the baby will be raised Catholic, in the fullest extent intended…so that the child will later be initiated into the other sacraments…Both parents must agree to the baby being baptized as well.
[/quote]

While this is greatly preferable, at a minimum only one parent has to agree for a baby to be baptised.

It sounds like this couple are treating the baptism as a purely social occasion, but it IS a baptism and I would go if invited. The graces of the sacrament, and being involved with the church in the baptism preparation (and presumably later on in the other sacraments for the child) will hopefully prod the parents in the right direction. I don’t see how just going to the baptism could be interpreted as approving the parents’ cohabitation.

[quote=Theodora]This is such a predictament. For the sake of the baby we’ll gladly go. I wonder if confronting the parents (who do live together without being married) will do any good.

Hopefully, the priest has given the unmarried couple a good lecture.

Theodora
[/quote]

You are very wise to allow the priest to be the one to instruct the couple, and to consider the welfare of the child in this. We must in Christian charity assume that if the baptism takes place, the pastor has assurance that the child will be raised Catholic, and also hopefully that he will be able to influence the couple to return to the Church themselves.

I wrote this on another thread but I’m going to say it again, because to me its important. In the 1930’s a little boy was born to a Catholic, yet unmarried girl who had an affair with a married man. After she found out that the boyfriend would never leave his family, she, finally, truly sorry for her sins, confessed them and started to get serious about her Religion, and had her little son Baptized. What happened to that fatherless child? Well today in his late sixties he is a Monsignor. What would have happened to this little boy (my Great Uncle) and his Mother, if the Catholic Church and his family turn their backs them.

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