baptism question


#1

Does any one know if its ok to have color on a baptismal gown? I made one for my cousin’s new baby but the only rosets that I could find for it were white with green leaves. The rest of the dress is white including the lace and ribon accents.


#2

[quote=leschornmom]Does any one know if its ok to have color on a baptismal gown? I made one for my cousin’s new baby but the only rosets that I could find for it were white with green leaves. The rest of the dress is white including the lace and ribon accents.
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That sounds lovely to me! The baptismal gown really is a tradition not a doctrine, so it really wouldn’t matter if it were red, but when the Church baptizes it does dress candidates in white robes, so it is appropriate, if not absolutely necessary. A few little green leaves won’t negate the intention of having a white baptismal gown, I’m sure.


#3

[quote=Della] A few little green leaves won’t negate the intention of having a white baptismal gown, I’m sure.
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That’s what I thought but not being Catholic I couldn’t be sure. Thanks so much. I’m so excited about her special day!


#4

[quote=leschornmom]Does any one know if its ok to have color on a baptismal gown? I made one for my cousin’s new baby but the only rosets that I could find for it were white with green leaves. The rest of the dress is white including the lace and ribon accents.
[/quote]

The “white garment” is typically given by the church to the parents along with the baptismal candle. It is symbolic, and not a real garment that the child wears. The symbolism is that white stands for purity gained through the washing away of Original Sin.

The gown you made sounds lovely, and I’m sure your cousin will be honored to have their child wear it.


#5

[quote=leschornmom]Does any one know if its ok to have color on a baptismal gown? I made one for my cousin’s new baby but the only rosets that I could find for it were white with green leaves. The rest of the dress is white including the lace and ribon accents.
[/quote]

Actually, white is not really correct when you think about it as it represents that sin has been washed away by the baptism. So the child having white on coming into the baptism is not really correct. That is why a white garment is generally placed over the child after the baptism. I do recognize that the child wearing a white gown is traditional in many places but it is not strictly a correct representation of what is happening. So I suppose I would say color should really not be a problem.


#6

What do you mean by the white garment? Is there one put on the baby during a baptism? or were you just speaking figuratively? I’ve never been to a Catholic baptism.and what is the baptism candle.


#7

[quote=leschornmom]What do you mean by the white garment? Is there one put on the baby during a baptism? or were you just speaking figuratively? I’ve never been to a Catholic baptism.and what is the baptism candle.
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Yes, there is actually a white garment given to the family. It’s usually just a little bib or something, and sometimes it’s placed on the child and sometimes just given to the parents.

In the early church-- first century-- baptisms were by immersion and the people were naked going into the baptismal pool. They would come out and be dressed in white robes symbolizing their rebirth in Christ and purity. The symbolic “white garment” given now to babies is based on that. Adult converts who are baptized are often dressed in a white robe at their baptism, so they too receive a “white garment”.

As for the candle, there is a small candle that is lit from the Pascal candle (the candle that is blessed at Easter) and given to the parents during the baptismal ceremony. When the candle is given the priest says, “receive the light of Christ”. It too is mostly symbolic but it represents the light of Christ and the role the parents and godparents play in teaching the child about Christ. Some people light the candle every year on the anniversary of the child’s baptism and have a little party-- like a birthday celebration-- because it celebrates their “birth” as a Christian.

However, none of this is relevant to the gown you have made for the baby. It is entirely appropriate and will be an heirloom!


#8

My son had to wear blue booties He needed a quick “change” and lo and behold his socks got Baptized before he did. I could not find any white socks or booties, we had to leave for Church, no one said anything, They all wore the same gown and were around the same age (3-6 weeks)but I can always tell which Baby’s photos are his;)


#9

[quote=leschornmom]That’s what I thought but not being Catholic I couldn’t be sure. Thanks so much. I’m so excited about her special day!
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You are one very special lady, leschhornmom! Your little roses sound beatiful! Cyber hug comin’ atcha from New York!


#10

It sounds perfect!!

My daughter’s baptismal dress (not a gown) had a very light pink ribbon in the front but was white, and my son’s baptismal suit (diaper set- jacket and diaper cover) had very light blue embroidery down the front of the jacket and on the back of the diaper cover. I think it’ll be lovely.


#11

[quote=Aesq]Actually, white is not really correct when you think about it as it represents that sin has been washed away by the baptism. So the child having white on coming into the baptism is not really correct. That is why a white garment is generally placed over the child after the baptism. I do recognize that the child wearing a white gown is traditional in many places but it is not strictly a correct representation of what is happening. So I suppose I would say color should really not be a problem.
[/quote]

I just talked to my cousin and she said it sounds fine. She also told me that with her other two girls the nun that asisted her had her wait until the baptism was done before they dressed her in her gown. I thought that that was a really neat idea. That way it truly does represent being born into christianity.


#12

[quote=leschornmom]I just talked to my cousin and she said it sounds fine. She also told me that with her other two girls the nun that asisted her had her wait until the baptism was done before they dressed her in her gown. I thought that that was a really neat idea. That way it truly does represent being born into christianity.
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That’s what they do in my parish. They encourage families to wait until after the baptism to dress the baby in the baptismal gown. So people generally bring the baby dressed in something simple. And my parish doesn’t believe in being stingy with water so a baby would need something dry to put on anyways.


#13

[quote=SMHW]That’s what they do in my parish. They encourage families to wait until after the baptism to dress the baby in the baptismal gown. So people generally bring the baby dressed in something simple. And my parish doesn’t believe in being stingy with water so a baby would need something dry to put on anyways.
[/quote]

I thought the priest just dips his hand in the Holy water and baptises them. How do they get wet? Does your parish but the beby in a faunt or something? Don’t all Catholic churches have the same guidelines?


#14

My mother made this beautiful baby-blue baptismal gown for my eldest son’s baptism. We had him dressed in it for the ceremony, and we were given a white garment to put on him. :thumbsup:


#15

It is not required to have the child wear a white gown or suit at all, so whatever he wears is fine. The white garment is part of the rite, and is usually a white bib or bonnet thing placed over the child at that time. Like the candle it may be supplied by the parish.


#16

My mom made my baptismal gown and added a long thin pink ribbon tied in a bow to the front… it didn’t seem to affect my Baptism.


#17

[quote=leschornmom]I thought the priest just dips his hand in the Holy water and baptises them. How do they get wet? Does your parish but the beby in a faunt or something? Don’t all Catholic churches have the same guidelines?
[/quote]

Sprinkling over the head is done when immersion is unavailable, depending on the available facilities. I was baptized as an infant by full immersion of the (nakie) body and sprinkling of over the head. They didn’t dunk my head under, My sister was baptised teh same way, but myfollowing two sibs were sprinkled upon the head at the same parish. The Baptismal font we were Baptized in was big enough for a baby but an adult would need to hold their head head over teh font and be sprinkled. All three of my babies were Bapt. by sprinkling over a font. The civillian parish in my town has a full immersion font, I think they go into teh water and are sprinkled over the head (such as in teh movie, “My Big Fat Greek Wedding” where they use a baby pool. It is almost like a standing Baptismal font attched to a pool and there is a fountain that goes over a little waterfall. I have been to Catholic parishes which have a baptismal font that looks almost like a sauna, with steps that they walk into and I assume that they have the option of dunking the head under water.

It is a valid Baptism either way.


#18

The “white garment” given to us had embroidery of the Church’s name on it and a candle all in color. I think your gown sounds beautiful and the consensus here is that it is perfectly appropriate. God bless!


#19

In our parish, parents have the option of immersion or the pouring of water. Father is very careful with the babies, doesn’t let them sink to the bottom if they are immersed. Then, the babies are placed in a big towel (individual towels, not all the babies in one big towel) and carted off to be dressed.

But the gown sounds beautiful!!! Your cousin and her baby are blessed to have your talent!!!


#20

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