Baptism

Saw a post in FB that my life long catholic SIL, who was Baptized in the CC, has fallen away, has found a boy friend who is Baptist, and is now "FINALLY’ getting baptized. Really??? Maybe a Protestant can explain to me why if there is only “ONE” Baptism, that there is the need for more and more Baptisms.
EPHESIANS - Chapter 4:“One Lord, one faith, one baptism”.

Question: what does “SIL” mean?

If she was baptized as a Catholic, I assume she was baptized as an infant? If so, then according to Baptist beliefs, she was never actually baptized.

Baptists believe that faith precedes baptism. You have to be baptized on a confession of faith. Without faith, there is no meaning or point in baptism.Therefore, from the Baptist perspective, there is only “One Lord, one faith, one baptism” and that baptism requires faith in that one lord, i.e. believers’ baptism. :wink:

(Also, please note that it is not the “Catholic” baptism that is in question. It is “infant baptism” that is rejected.)

sister in law

I have to plead ignorance about Baptists, but I know that some protestant denominations practice baptism by immersion. Pouring water over someone’s head doesn’t make the grade.

That’s one issue, but more importantly they do not recognize infant Baptisms. They believe you must first have accepted Christ before you can be baptized. It is more of a public proclamation that they are Christian. They have little to know understanding of the sacraments.

[quote=wmscott] Saw a post in FB that my life long catholic SIL, who was Baptized in the CC, has fallen away, has found a boy friend who is Baptist, and is now " FINALLY’ getting baptized. Really??? Maybe a Protestant can explain to me why if there is only " ONE" Baptism, that there is the need for more and more Baptisms.
EPHESIANS - Chapter 4:“One Lord, one faith, one baptism”.
[/quote]

(please correct me if I am wrong)I believe contemporary evangelicals and Baptists do not believe in the salvific affects of baptism. Therefore, they have no problem delaying Baptism, and as a result, some die without the sacrament. What a pity.

Posted from Catholic.com App for Android

So why does it matter if it is done at the proper time and method?

Because some Protestants completely misunderstand and pervert baptism, making it a work you have to do once you have gained enough knowledge, shed enough tears, feel sorry enough for your sins, be changed enough inwardly… Once youre “enough” enough you go ahead and do this work.

Get a nice emotional high, then do baptism, then once that emotional high wears off what are you gonna do? Get high again and do another baptism.

I have spoken to some who have been baptized 6 or 7 times. This is a perversion of the gospel, making it just something you do to rededicate your life to Christ or something.

Evangelical views vary (for example, the Nazarene Church gives parents the option of infant baptism).

When it comes to Baptists, believers’ baptism by immersion is one of the fundamental Baptist trademarks. This is what the current Southern Baptist Convention’s belief statement says about baptism:

[INDENT]Christian baptism is the immersion of a believer in water in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. It is an act of obedience symbolizing the believer’s faith in a crucified, buried, and risen Saviour, the believer’s death to sin, the burial of the old life, and the resurrection to walk in newness of life in Christ Jesus. It is a testimony to his faith in the final resurrection of the dead. Being a church ordinance, it is prerequisite to the privileges of church membership and to the Lord’s Supper.[/INDENT]

The American Baptist Churches USA (formerly known as the Northern Baptist Convention) say this about baptism:

[INDENT]American Baptists partake of two ordinances exemplifying obedience to our Lord’s commands: believers’ baptism and the Lord’s Supper. We insist that baptism be administered only to those who have the maturity to understand its profound significance: resurrection to new life in Christ. And we follow the biblical example set by Christ when we fully immerse in water, a beautiful symbolic statement of that new life.
[/INDENT]

Chapter 29 “Of Baptism” of the 1689 Baptist Confession says:

[INDENT]Baptism is an ordinance of the New Testament, ordained by Jesus Christ, to be unto the party baptized, a sign of his fellowship with him, in his death and resurrection; of his being engrafted into him; of remission of sins; and of giving up into God, through Jesus Christ, to live and walk in newness of life.
Rom. 6:3-5; Col. 2:12; Gal. 3:27
Mark 1:4; Acts 22:16
Rom. 6:4

Those who do actually profess repentance towards God, faith in, and obedience to, our Lord Jesus Christ, are the only proper subjects of this ordinance.
Mark 16:16; Acts 8:36,37, 2:41, 8:12, 18:8

The outward element to be used in this ordinance is water, wherein the party is to be baptized, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.
Matt. 28:19, 20; Acts 8:38

Immersion, or dipping of the person in water, is necessary to the due administration of this ordinance.
Matt. 3:16; John 3:23[/INDENT]

[quote=fbl9] Quote:

Originally Posted by concretecamper

(please correct me if I am wrong)I believe contemporary evangelicals and Baptists do not believe in the salvific affects of baptism. Therefore, they have no problem delaying Baptism, and as a result, some die without the sacrament. What a pity.

Posted from Catholic.com App for Android

So why does it matter if it is done at the proper time and method?
[/quote]

I am not sure what you mean by proper time and method.

From a Catholic perspective, the proper time is ASAP after birth because Baptism is the First Sacrament of Initiation and Baptism is required for salvation.

Posted from Catholic.com App for Android

Well from a Lutheran and Methodist perspective one baptism with water was sufficient. That is the background I’m coming from. Now, my parents have been nondenominational/ Pentecostal, read your own Bible, do your own thing charismatics for about 20 years. I’ve attended a revival or service with them on occasion. They don’t talk about multiple baptisms with water but there are a lot of altar calls, laying on of hands, and being baptized in the Holy Spirit. That seems to be the way they rededicate themselves to Christ, especially after one has screwed up or something. Had a minister ask me if I had been baptized and I said yes, To which he responds,“Yes but have you been baptized in the Holy Spirit?” Really I had no clue what he was talking about but everyone around me seemed to want me to say no so he could get on with it. I was baptized in the spirit I guess, I don’t know, it freaked me out and I just wanted to go home. I guess some people feel they need to go through all that high drama every time they attend church. I just find it exhausting.:shrug:

Thank you, this confirms what I thought…baptists incorrectly view it as a symbol.

Baptists do have altar calls (at least some of them do). However, besides those of a charismatic bent or a “Bapticostal” persuasion, many are actually somewhat hostile or suspicious of Pentecostal tendencies. For example, the Southern Baptist Convention gained attention a few years ago for refusing to recruit missionaries who spoke in tongues in private.

Oh yeah and they “recommit their lives to Christ” over and over.

They believe you are saved once when you pray the sinners pray. You get a nice emotional high there.

Then baptism. Diddo.

Then you just head the altar call by “recommitting your life” over and over and over.

If you have been confirmed then you were baptized in the Holy Spirit. In Acts 2 the disciples gathered together in prayer were baptized in the Holy Spirit. In Acts 8, in Samaria Phillip had already baptized the people who believed…but then they have to call Peter and John to come lay hands on them to receive the Holy Spirit. It couldn’t just be Phillip, a deacon…but one of the apostles. confirmation leaves a mark/seal on your soul as does baptism. (rev 7:2-3) You receive the Holy Spirit at baptism but at Confirmation you receive a greater outpouring of the Holy Spirit in your soul. It cannot be repeated. What they do is more of a laying on of hands and letting the Holy Spirit act within you.

I was Baptized Anglican as a baby but did not believe in anything until the age 12. I wasn’t raised Christian but my parents Baptized me as a traditional thing. After I accepted Jesus I was Baptized because that’s what I was told I must do; I pray God forgives me if I have made a mistake.

That being said, what is the official rule on babies who die at birth or are never born? Where do they go? What happens?

You did nothing wrong in being rebaptized. You were trying to pursue Christ. He knows your heart. Your second baptism truly fit the Protestant definition of symbolism as you received the ongoing grace of baptism at your infant baptism (which may be why you are pursuing Christ :slight_smile: )

As far as babies without baptism, aborted, etc…

We pray for them and leave it to God’s loving mercy and justice since it has not been revealed in scripture or through the church.

I was actually thinking of PMing you a few minutes ago just to tell you that you’re a good guy and I really like you, but I’ll just put it here instead.

God bless you sir, you’re a good person.

Has it been revealed at what age a child can be held accountable for not being Baptized because one does not know about it?

Thanks! I enjoy our conversations! It’s nice when someone like you is truly seeking Christ not just arguing!

Has it been revealed at what age a child can be held accountable for not being Baptized because one does not know about it?

No it hasn’t which is why Catholics are encouraged to baptize as soon as possible. It is also why the church permits anyone (even non Christians) to baptize in danger of death. It was even taught in my Paramedic textbook how to baptize properly.

It’s interesting because many Protestants hold a belief in “age of accountability” but I know nothing in scripture to support such a claim.

It’s interesting the church father’s only real debate in infant baptism was whether it should be done immediately at birth or on the 8th day to correspond with circumcision which baptism replaced.

Actually Itwin, this bolded statement might not be true for all Baptist denominations. A friend of mine was brought into the Catholic Church through RCIA as an adult and was baptized as an adult. Converted to Baptist with his wife approximately 10 years later and was required to be baptized again as they did not recognize his Catholic Baptism…:shrug:

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.