baptism

Im due to get my son baptism in June and I was going to ask my sister and her husband to take on the role of god parents, but since they were god parents to my daughter their religious views have change my sister believes in God but now considers herself to be a wiccan and my brother in law is agnostic. Do I need to find god parents or can my son be baptised with them.

Get different God Parents for your son.

God bless.

Cathoholic

From the Roman Catechism:

The Sponsors at Baptism

Besides the ministers who, as just explained, confer Baptism, another class of persons, according to the most ancient practice of the Church, is admitted to assist at the baptismal font. In former times these were commonly called by sacred writers receivers, sponsors or sureties, and are now called godfathers and godmothers. As this is an office pertaining almost to all the laity, pastors should explain it with care, so that the faithful may understand what is chiefly necessary for its proper performance.

Why Sponsors Are Required At Baptism

In the first instance it should be explained why at Baptism, besides those who administer the Sacrament, godparents and sponsors are also required. The propriety of the practice will at once appear to all if they recollect that Baptism is a spiritual regeneration by which we are born children of God; for of it St. Peter says: As newborn infants, desire the rational milk without guile. As, therefore, every one, after his birth, requires a nurse and instructor by whose assistance and attention he is brought up and formed to learning and useful knowledge, so those, who, by the waters of Baptism, begin to live a spiritual life should be entrusted to the fidelity and prudence of some one from whom they may imbibe the precepts of the Christian religion and may be brought up in all holiness, and thus grow gradually in Christ, until, with the Lord’s help, they at length arrive at perfect manhood.

This necessity must appear still more imperative, if we recollect that pastors, who are charged with the public care of parishes have not sufficient time to undertake the private instruction of children in the rudiments of faith.

Antiquity Of This Law

Concerning this very ancient practice we have this noteworthy testimony of St. Denis: It occurred to our divine leaders (so he called the Apostles), and they in their wisdom ordained that infants should be introduced (into the Church) in this holy manner that their natural parents should deliver them to the care of some one well skilled in divine things, as to a master under whom, as a spiritual father and guardian of his salvation in holiness, the child should lead the remainder of his life. The same doctrine is confirmed by the authority of Hyginus.

Affinity Contracted By Sponsors

The Church, therefore, in her wisdom has ordained that not only the person who baptises contracts a spiritual affinity with the person baptised, but also the sponsor with the godchild and its natural parents, so that between all these marriage cannot be lawfully contracted, and if contracted, it is null and void.

Duties Of Sponsors

The faithful are also to be taught the duty of sponsors; for such is the negligence with which this office is treated in the Church that only the bare name of the function remains, while none seem to have the least idea of its sanctity. Let all sponsors, then, at all times recollect that they are strictly bound by this law to exercise a constant vigilance over their spiritual children, and carefully to instruct them in the maxims of a Christian life; so that these may show themselves throughout life to be what their sponsors promised in the solemn ceremony.

On this subject let us hear the words of St. Denis. Speaking in the person of the sponsor he says: I promise, by my constant exhortations to induce this child, when he comes to a knowledge of religion, to renounce every thing opposed (to his Christian calling) and to profess and perform the sacred promises which he now makes.

St. Augustine also says: I most especially admonish you, men and women, who have acquired godchildren through Baptism, to consider that you stood as sureties before God, for those whom you received at the sacred font. Indeed it preeminently becomes every man, who undertakes any office, to be indefatigable in the discharge of its duties; and he who promised to be the teacher and guardian of another should never allow to be deserted him whom he once received under his care and protection as long as he knows the latter to stand in need of either.

Speaking of this same duty of sponsors, St. Augustine sums up in a few words the lessons of instruction which they are bound to impart to their spiritual children. They ought, he says, to admonish them to observe chastity, love justice, cling to charity; and above all they should teach them the Creed, the Lord’s Prayer, the Ten Commandments, and the rudiments of the Christian religion.

Who May Not Be Sponsors

It is easy, therefore, to decide who are inadmissible to this holy guardianship, that is, those who are unwilling to discharge its duties with fidelity, or who cannot do so with care and accuracy.

Wherefore, besides the natural parents, who, to mark the great difference that exists between this spiritual and the carnal bringing up of youth, are not permitted to undertake this charge, heretics, Jews and infidels are on no account to be admitted to this office, since their thoughts and efforts are continually employed in darkening by falsehood the true faith and in subverting all Christian piety.

Number Of Sponsors

The number of sponsors is limited by the Council of Trent to one godfather or one godmother, or at most, to a godfather and a godmother; because a number of teachers may confuse the order of discipline and instruction, and also because it was necessary to prevent the multiplication of affinities which would impede a wider diffusion of society by means of lawful marriage.

Necessity of Baptism

If the knowledge of what has been hitherto explained be, as it is, of highest importance to the faithful, . . .

At least one of the two must be a devout, practicing Catholic. The other can be a baptized upright practicing non-Catholic Christian who would be recorded as a witness rather than as a godparent. I am afraid that your family members don’t appear to qualify.

One of the requirements of a godparent (sponsor) is: “leads a life of faith in keeping with the function to be taken on”. (From Code of Canon Law, Canon 874, which is at vatican.va/archive/ENG1104/_P2Y.HTM ).

They are also mentioned in the Code of Canon Law under the heading “Catechical Formation”: “Parents above others are obliged to form their children by word and example in faith and in the practice of Christian life; sponsors and those who take the place of parents are bound by an equal obligation.” (At vatican.va/archive/ENG1104/_P2K.HTM ).

well looks like my son wont get baptisted then as non of my family that i have contact with are catholic and neither are my friends, i dont know many people where i live so, now it will have to wait.

sorry meant without Godparents

You don’t have to give up the idea of baptism. Speak to your priest. He will be able to advise you. Also, become as involved as you can in activities at your church. Meet some Catholics and get to know them. I am sure that this is possible!

Finally my son will be baptisted on the 1st June during the morning mass, my mother is allowed to be godmother and my nephew has agreed to be godfather, im so pleased,saw my priest yesterday and everything has been confirmed :slight_smile:

I am so happy for all of you! Many blessings to you all!

:egyptian:

:confused:

I thought that none of your family, that you had contact with, were practicing Catholics? :shrug:

Has that changed??

My mum is church of England she will be a witness, my nephew who is already a godfather to his nephew who is Roman catholic has agreed to do it, both have been approved by my parish priest. I never considered my nephews

Its always who we don’t think about. :thumbsup:

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