Baptist to Catholic?


#1

I’m looking for some help and advise.
I have been raised a Baptist and I have attended Medothist Churches.
I have been praying that god will lead me to the right Church.
I have been reading about Catholic’s and I’m really interested in learning more about the faith.
The way I was raised to believe isn’t the way that I have read the last few days. I’m torn in which religion I should be attending.
I’m really wanting to learn more about being Catholic but I don’t know where to start at.
It seems to me that being Catholic is a lifestyle and a more in-depth faith. Than what I’m use to. I go to church on Sundays and I just feel like something is missing.
But what I have read I believe and agree with the Catholic Faith. But I’m so at lose as to the teachings and even the words. In Baptist on Sunday morning you go to preaching. I didn’t even know that Mass meant the same thing until today. I’m not even sure that I would be accepted into the faith or not, since I wasn’t born a Catholic. Does any of this make since? To break it down a little I’m looking for a better understanding of God and I want to live my life for God , I just don’t know where to start at,
I’m 41 years old and we have been married 21 years and we have a 12 year old son. My husband said he will attend church with me so I can see for myself what its about. Can someone talk to me about these matters please. I’m lost as to what and how I should do.


#2

First, I would recommend that you look around to some area churches and see if you could find a good RCIA program. This is the perfect time of year to do it, as most classes are just starting. RCIA stand for Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults. It is geared for those who are not Catholic and the first few months should be presented as an exploration of what Catholicism is.

What do I mean by a good RCIA? I am partial to one that is taught by the priest, as that is what we have. It tends to keep the teaching true and orthodox.

A great resource is right at your finger tips on the Catholic Answers main page. www.catholic.com Also, the Catechism of the Catholic Church is a great resource, since it covers the core of what we believe, usccb.org/catechism/text/index.htm The Bible is essential reading to spiritual growth for all Christians.
usccb.org/nab/bible/index.htm

You can also post here any specific questions you have and we will try to answer them.

If you want to know a personal story of someone who has walked the same path, David Currie has a book out called* Born Fundamentlist, Born Again Catholic*. Patrick Madrd has several books Surprised By the Truth (I,II &III) (I, too, was raised a Baptist and was ordained as a Baptist before I discovered Catholicism.) For a great comparison between beliefs you can’t beat Karl Keating’s Catholicism and Fundamentalism.


#3

Hi & welcome to the forums,

I highly recommend Fr. Oscar Lukefahr’s free book, “We Believe - A Survey of the Catholic Faith.” It summarizes with cross-references to the Catechism of the Catholic Church basic Catholic doctrines, dogma and Tradition. You can get it for free (with free shipping, too!) from amm.org/chss.htm. If it helps you, send him a donation, they operate with not much money.

P.S. check out scripturecatholic.com & earlychristianwritings.com.

One more thing, you can enroll in RCIA classes (Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults) which will give you a basic catechis of Catholic doctrine. And, if you choose to do so, will be accepted into the Church at Easter fully confirmed and in union with the Catholic Church. Call your parish’s secretary and see if classes have already started (they start in the fall, so they might have) and get enrolled.

God bless,

Edit: there is also a good book called Catholicism and Fundamentalism. I can’t remember the name of the author, but it was written by a former protestant fundamentalist turned Catholic convert. It basically compares and contrasts the beliefs of Catholics and Fundamentalists and shows the Catholic side of the issue. You may want to check that out too. You can get that right here from the catholic.com store. Also, check out ignatius.com and getfed.com for other Catholic books.

The Old Catholic Encyclopedia is also available online at newadvent.org. I hope this provides ya with enough reading material for now. :wink:


#4

Here is some online audio stuff…
salvationhistory.com/bookstore/audioRsrcs.cfm


#5

[quote=Semper Fi]Hi & welcome to the forums,

I highly recommend Fr. Oscar Lukefahr’s free book, “We Believe - A Survey of the Catholic Faith.” It summarizes with cross-references to the Catechism of the Catholic Church basic Catholic doctrines, dogma and Tradition. You can get it for free (with free shipping, too!) from amm.org/chss.htm. If it helps you, send him a donation, they operate with not much money.

P.S. check out scripturecatholic.com & earlychristianwritings.com.

One more thing, you can enroll in RCIA classes (Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults) which will give you a basic catechis of Catholic doctrine. And, if you choose to do so, will be accepted into the Church at Easter fully confirmed and in union with the Catholic Church. Call your parish’s secretary and see if classes have already started (they start in the fall, so they might have) and get enrolled.

God bless,

Edit: there is also a good book called Catholicism and Fundamentalism. I can’t remember the name of the author, but it was written by a former protestant fundamentalist turned Catholic convert. It basically compares and contrasts the beliefs of Catholics and Fundamentalists and shows the Catholic side of the issue. You may want to check that out too. You can get that right here from the catholic.com store. Also, check out ignatius.com and getfed.com for other Catholic books.

The Old Catholic Encyclopedia is also available online at newadvent.org. I hope this provides ya with enough reading material for now. :wink:
[/quote]

Catholicism and Fundamentalism was by Karl Keating, and last I checked he was a cradle Catholic (born Catholic).:hmmm:


#6

[quote=FuzzyBunny116]Catholicism and Fundamentalism was by Karl Keating, and last I checked he was a cradle Catholic (born Catholic).:hmmm:
[/quote]

Ah yeah, I know. I looked up his name and I felt stupid (it was too late to edit the post). Heh. Ah well… there was another book I was thinking of, that was written by a former Protestant pastor/theologian, which was along the same lines :wink:


#7

Welcome, you are entering a journey that will make you see things in a very different way-a wonderful way. Please be patient and let the Holy Spirit guide you and your hubby. I am a cradle Catholic and did not see the light until I was 50ish, so its never to late if you care enough. :blessyou:


#8

Firstly, hello!

I’d add just a couple of things. Yes, of course you could be accepted into the Catholic Church even though you weren’t born Catholic. You would simply go through a period of study of Catholicism (often called RCIA) at your local church, after which you would proclaim that you accept the Church and believe all that she teaches. You would then receive the sacraments of Baptism (but only if you have not been baptised in the Trinitarian form before, which is almost certainly not the situation in your case – the Catholic Church never “re-baptises”), Confession, Confirmation and Holy Eucharist.

By the way, Easter is the traditional time when people are brought into the Church as above, but one can be brought in at any time of the year.

You may also want to listen to the archives of the EWTN TV show “The Journey Home”, in which people tell of their own journeys from atheism or other religions into the Catholic faith. Here’s a link:

The Journey Home archived shows

And finally, may God bless you in your search for His fullness and His truth. Seek Him and He will lead you.


#9

Welcome Bren!

Of course you can be accepted into the Catholic Church, it is open to everyone! That’s what RCIA is for, as previously mentioned. And you can certainly attend Mass whenever you want, you don’t have to be Catholic to attend. And try not to feel uncomfortable if you do not know what’s going on. Most people won’t notice and even if they do, Catholic’s are very understanding about that. :wink: I would recommend for you to study up a little before you go about what goes on at Mass. It really helps to understand what’s going on because you get so much more out of the Mass. I can’t think of a resource for that off the top of my head, but I’m sure someone here has some ideas. The Catholic Answers home page has a wealth of information for you to start, and also check out the bookstore part for some excellent books to learn about the Faith.

Take some time out to call up your local Catholic Church and ask to arrange a meeting with one of the priests to chat about your concerns/questions.

Stick around these forums and read. You will learn so much here (I have and I’m a cradle Catholic). And don’t ever be afraid to ask a question, even if you think it’s a “dumb” question, especially questions about Catholic doctrine that you are struggling to accept. You will get good, solid answers to anything you have trouble with!

Good luck on your journey!


#10

Bren…

I’ll tell you a secret that most protestants might regurgitate on if they knew…

Everyone who has a valid Baptism is considered Catholic, they just don’t know it is all :smiley:

Welcome home sister!!! With open arms! Enjoy your journey!


#11

“Crossing The Tiber” by Steven Ray is an exellent resource. He is a convert from the baptist faith.

God Bless you on your journey,
Mickey


#12

Here is a site of about a bzillion conversions. Some from years ago, some very recent. Enjoy if you like “listening in” on the mind, thoughts and struggles of converts
There’s even a section on just:
Women Converts

Here is a site wholly dedicated to Baptists thinking of converting.

Finally, there are countless baptist converts on this forum. Seek them out with a thread asking for their assistance. They will gladly flock to you and you can even email back and forth.

It may help if you let us know what city you live in or near. We may have lots of forum members who can guide you to a specific parish or church or RCIA class in your area.


#13

[quote=Mickey]“Crossing The Tiber” by Steven Ray is an exellent resource. He is a convert from the baptist faith.

God Bless you on your journey,
Mickey
[/quote]

Mark P Shea’s “By What Authority” is a pretty good reference too and explains the papacy through the 2000 years of Catholic history and proves that Christianity has never been without a pope. You can get most of these books pretty cheaply used on amazon.com or from local Catholic bookstores. New, they’re pretty reasonable too.


#14

I want to Thank everyone that has replied to my post.
I have alot of reading to do. Thank you for all the encourments and links these will really help.

One thing that I love about the Catholic Faith is that its constant, unchanging.
I have been to different churches and it like the faith changes and there are always different beliefs from church to church. Even if its a Baptist church.
I hope I explained that right.
I have learned so many things the last few days that Ive never knew.
Its so exciting to learn things like this.that Ive never looked at before or even wondered about.
Its so refreshing to not be confused about what to believe.from one minute to the next or from one church to the next.

Thank you all again for your replies.


#15

[quote=Bren]Its so exciting to learn things like this.that Ive never looked at before or even wondered about.
Its so refreshing to not be confused about what to believe.from one minute to the next or from one church to the next.

[/quote]

Now you understand why Christ more than just a Bible, He left a visible, teaching, infallible Church. Within the Church you will find every truth you learned as a Baptist affirmed. Not every teaching, but every truth. Just as you will also find every moral and ethical truth affirmed by the Church. Within Her is the fullness of God’s revelation.


#16

Bren:

Welcome!!!

A lot of good reading indeed! The world you’re about to enter is greater than meets the eye. There will be many issues that you’ll be wondering about and we’re more than happy to put our $0.02 in.

Scott Hahn is a good one to start with. Rome Sweet Home is a good read. Every Monday night 8et. at EWTN is the Journey Home program which I think you’d enjoy. You can watch it over the internet if you don’t have it in cable.

Through this journey, keep praying deeply for guidance and illumination.

Keep us posted.

in XT.


#17

If you can…listen to a Catholic radio station if there is one in your area or click onto relevantradio.com/docs/index.asp
and you can listen to it live. It is Catholic talk radio all day long. Not night time but rather daytime. I am convinced that you will find out practical information, and since it also provides answers to people who call in with questions…you may find yourself dialing them as well.

And with all things, pray, pray and pray some more.
Welcome Home!


#18

[quote=Bren]I’m looking for some help and advise.
I have been raised a Baptist and I have attended Medothist Churches.
I have been praying that god will lead me to the right Church.
I have been reading about Catholic’s and I’m really interested in learning more about the faith.
The way I was raised to believe isn’t the way that I have read the last few days. I’m torn in which religion I should be attending.
I’m really wanting to learn more about being Catholic but I don’t know where to start at.
It seems to me that being Catholic is a lifestyle and a more in-depth faith. Than what I’m use to. I go to church on Sundays and I just feel like something is missing.
[/quote]

Hi Bren,
And welcome! I’m a former Baptist who began searching like you are and, as a matter of fact I was received into the Catholic Church on September 28, 1963:thumbsup:
Go to your nearest Catholic Church and make an appointment to see a priest and start there. He will help you w/ the rest. I’ll keep you in my prayers…:slight_smile:


#19

[quote=stbruno]If you can…listen to a Catholic radio station if there is one in your area or click onto relevantradio.com/docs/index.asp
and you can listen to it live. It is Catholic talk radio all day long. Not night time but rather daytime. I am convinced that you will find out practical information, and since it also provides answers to people who call in with questions…you may find yourself dialing them as well.

And with all things, pray, pray and pray some more.
Welcome Home!
[/quote]

avemariaradio.net is another one. ewtn.com also has streaming video and audio. They also broadcast mass so you can see for yourself what it’s like before actually going into a Church and get an idea what you need to do.

masstimes.org is also a good reference to look up parishes near you.


#20

One more thing that I would like to add is if you do end up going to a Mass, you shouldn’t take communion until you are fully confirmed within the Catholic Church. Good luck and keep us posted.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.