Baptize my grandson who is Church of Christ?

My daughter in law is Church of Christ. She will NOT have my grandson(9 months) baptized yet. I think we all know why from the faith of the CoC. We,as Catholic know the reason why we should baptize at birth. What do you think? Should baptism be performed by myself or take his chances in the next 10-13yrs? And if I did baptize him, what would happen if she thought it wasn’t a legitamate baptism and he was “rebaptized”?

I wouldn’t recommend it. I think that a person who has a child baptized is making a commitment to raise that child in the Christian faith. That’s why you would recite the Creed for him on his behalf. You cannot fulfiil your obligation without the parents’ conscent. Not to mention that such an act is utterly disrecpectful to the parents and could alienate you from the child. I would entrust the soul of you grandson to the Lord and if it is His will your grandson will be saved.

i would talk to a priest first to see what he would say. personally id say go for it. i think as a grandmother, you would have a positive influence on your grandchild. and if you take this step, perhaps the Lord will open up doorways, to where you can have more of an influence on the Childs faith. but first, a Priest and prayer. Peace :slight_smile:

?Short Answer: NO!

Longer answer:

Can. 868 §1. For an infant to be baptized licitly:
1/ the parents or at least one of them or the person who legitimately takes their place must consent;
2/ there must be a founded hope that the infant will be brought up in the Catholic religion; if such hope is altogether lacking, the baptism is to be delayed according to the prescripts of particular law after the parents have been advised about the reason.
§2. An infant of Catholic parents or even of non-Catholic parents is baptized licitly in danger of death even against the will of the parents.

No. You cannot do this. The Church requires the parents’ consent and promise of raising the child in the faith.

If your grandson is ever in danger of death, yes you can perform an emergency baptism.

Your son needs to take the lead and insist upon baptism for his child and make the commitment to raise the child Catholic.

Ok,consent is needed but raising him in the Catholic faith atleast right now seems not possible. A lot of people baptize then get confirmed later (protestant) in the Catholic faith,which is a"maybe" for him. We will never know. How would we know if a person baptized in the Catholic faith stays catholic. Just comparing the situations. In other words baptizing is baptizing? right? Along with consent ofcourse . Fear of an accident and my son in the military,going over seas a possibility scares me. Not able to be close in a emrgency situation.

no you may not licitly baptize your grandson unless he is in immediate danger of death. In canon law he may not be baptized at all without his parent’s permission. Should you do it anyway it would be valid but illicit, not to mention to rift you will be causing in the family which could separate you from your grandchild indefinitely. is there some reason why you have not asked your own priest this question?

I remember in the Archdiocese of Chicago a priest refusing to baptize the child of non-practicing Catholic parents.

Don’t worry about it. You will Just make her mad if you do baptize him now. He will told he later he really was not baptized in first place because her Church does not recognize infant baptism or sprinkling. She believes, as do I, the bible teaches you are baptized because you believe. I believe the Bible is very clear on that. Infant baptism is a 5th century idea that came from Augustine. It was not practiced before then. I believe that God is a just and merciful God. Do you really think that a child that can not talk or walk is really going to sent to Hell? I believe that their will be a lot of people who were baptized as infants that are going to Hell. Who go to Church all the time. But a baby or small child? My question is what kind of God do you believe in?

Is the child’s life in danger? If not,do not do it!

And? I am sure there is more to the situation or circumstances.

We too are in the same situation. I believe it would be sinful on my part to baptize my grandchildren without their parents’ consent. I believe in a merciful God. However, besides bringing the child into the Church - which is very important - our son has denied his small children being given the name of Christian and becoming an adopted son of God and a brother of Christ in order to keep peace in the house. So he has abandoned his faith. What I have a hard time understanding is if the child(ren) were to die before baptism why would any parent not want the child to enter heaven not properly garbed as a brother to Jesus?

As to the poster who said that infant baptism started with St. Augustine, there are earlier church fathers (2nd century) who wrote that it was wrong for parents not to baptize their children. I think it was St. Polycarp, but don’t have time to look it up now.

May God have mercy on my son for his presumption on the mercy of God.

There were plenty of early Christians who testify to the fact of infant baptism in the early Church CENTURIES before Augustine. A good place to find these references is section 2 from the book “Crossing the Tiber: Evangelical Protestants Discover the Historical Church” by Stephen Ray. In section 2, Ray (a former Baptist) sites many of the early Church fathers in favor of infant baptism AND gives footnotes so that the reader can verify for himself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by davec66
I believe the Bible is very clear on that. Infant baptism is a 5th century idea that came from Augustine. It was not practiced before then.

Incorrect. Plenty of historical writings showing infant baptism was common practice long before Augustine.The Bible is very clear that Paul baptized households,not adults only. I have yet to read anything from Jewish sources where the ancient Jews did not consider infants as part of the households.

This seems in accord with Canon Law.

Can. 867 §1. Parents are obliged to take care that infants are baptized in the first few weeks; as soon as possible after the birth or even before it, they are to go to the pastor to request the sacrament for their child and to be prepared properly for it.
§2. An infant in danger of death is to be baptized without delay.
Can. 868 §1. For an infant to be baptized licitly:
1/ the parents or at least one of them or the person who legitimately takes their place must consent;
2/ there must be a founded hope that the infant will be brought up in the Catholic religion; if such hope is altogether lacking, the baptism is to be delayed according to the prescripts of particular law after the parents have been advised about the reason.
§2. An infant of Catholic parents or even of non-Catholic parents is baptized licitly in danger of death even against the will of the parents.

If the parents are not practicing the Faith themselves, there seems little hope that they will bring the child up Catholic.

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.