Baptized in the Catholic rite


#1

When the previous pastor was here, he mentioned that if a Protestant converted to Catholicism, the Protestant would not have to receive the Sacrament of Baptism.
The Protestant would have been baptized in his Protestant faith.
However, if the Protestant, becoming a new Catholic, insists on being baptized in the Catholic rite, would he be denied Baptism?


#2

If they suspect or that it’s possible that they had an invalid baptism…the church will do what is called a conditional baptism (meaning they will baptize simply to make sure the individual has a valid baptism…if their previous baptism was valid…then the sacrament really doesn’t do anything).

No the church does not re-baptize because someone really wants it.


#3

If a Protestant has been validly Baptized… we say there’s only one Baptism. So it must have been really a Catholic one even if his Protestant church didn’t know that. :slight_smile:

But this is a really big point. There’s no re-baptize. Either you’re validly baptized (yay!) or you’re not (sigh); and there’s “conditionally baptize” if there’s no human way to tell whether a baptism was valid. But that’s it.

Since he’s getting Confirmed, that’s all about strengthening and confirming the grace and gifts of Baptism (which is by water and the Spirit) as well as receiving the Holy Spirit and His gifts. He’ll better understand and be able to use the graces of his Baptism.

Since he’ll also be making his first Confession and his first Communion, I guarantee that he won’t feel like he’s missing out on anything. Those are amazing Sacraments.

He is one of the Faithful, already baptized. He is reconciling with the Church and receiving other Sacraments of initiation.


#4

Unless there is doubt about the validity of his Protestant Baptism, he would b denied re-Baptism. That would be considered simulating a Sacrament - a grave sin.


#5

Why get re-baptised? You’re already a Catholic by virtue of your baptism.

Well, unless you get baptised as a Mormon or a Jehovah’s Witness, or “in the name of the Creator, the Redeemer, and the Sanctifier”, or anything like that.


#6

It is frequently the practice in Catholic parishes to perform “supplied rites” after an emergency baptism. This means anointing and presentation of the candle and the garment in a church ceremony. This also has the effect of soothing the parents and family who really wanted their child to have a party. But the supplied rites are a non-essential part of baptism. I am not aware of any case where a baptized adult convert would be afforded supplied rites on request.


#7

Depends on the priest and what church the person is from. The Catholic church has a long list of churches that it recognizes so it really depends.


#8

I think you mean “ecclesial communities”. There is an extremely short list of true Churches which we recognize. It consists of the Assyrian Church of the East, Oriental Orthodox and Eastern Orthodox communions, and some Old Catholic communities. Protestants all fall in the category of ecclesial communities and should not be called Churches.


#9

That was Benedict. Pope Francis uses the word churches.

“We each have in our churches excellent theologians. That’s another way to walk together also, but we shouldn’t wait for them to reach agreement,” he said.

cruxnow.com/church/2014/10/28/pope-francis-urges-catholics-protestants-work-together-video/


#10

Have you read the Nicene Creed - it is affirmed by Christians each Sunday at Mass …

In the Creed - we affirm our belief …

I believe in ONE Baptism for the forgiveness of sins …

If you were Baptized in the traditional Christian manner - with proper intent - to turn away from sin and follow Christ, with proper matter - water, and with proper form - Trinitarian - In the Name of the Father, the Son and Holy Spirit … you are a validly baptized person … you cannot receive a “second” baptism …

If you were baptized and one of the three conditions is unknowable - or if there is a question about whether or not you were baptized the Church would perform a “Conditional” Baptism …

If you were baptized in the Mormon or Jehovah’s Witness - they do not baptize in the Trinitarian formula - so you would be baptized in the traditional Christian manner


#11

Pope Francis speaks off the cuff and likes to use imprecise language. Remember when he said the 'Ndrangheta are excommunicated when that is not de jure true.

It is infallible Church teaching that Protestant ecclesial communities are not Churches. Pope Francis cannot change that with an off-the-cuff remark.

Unitatis redintegratio

Though the ecclesial Communities which are separated from us lack the fullness of unity with us flowing from Baptism, and though we believe they have not retained the proper reality of the eucharistic mystery in its fullness, especially because of the absence of the sacrament of Orders, nevertheless when they commemorate His death and resurrection in the Lord’s Supper, they profess that it signifies life in communion with Christ and look forward to His coming in glory. Therefore the teaching concerning the Lord’s Supper, the other sacraments, worship, the ministry of the Church, must be the subject of the dialogue.

Responses to some questions regarding certain aspects of the doctrine on the Church

FIFTH QUESTION

Why do the texts of the Council and those of the Magisterium since the Council not use the title of “Church” with regard to those Christian Communities born out of the Reformation of the sixteenth century?

RESPONSE

According to Catholic doctrine, these Communities do not enjoy apostolic succession in the sacrament of Orders, and are, therefore, deprived of a constitutive element of the Church. These ecclesial Communities which, specifically because of the absence of the sacramental priesthood, have not preserved the genuine and integral substance of the Eucharistic Mystery[19] cannot, according to Catholic doctrine, be called “Churches” in the proper sense[20].


#12

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