Baronius Press Breviary

I started this thread so people can talk about the upcoming Baronius Press Breviary.

I would like to hear your comments and questions!:smiley:

God bless,

Breviarylover

My only negative criticism is using the prose translation of the Office Hymns, instead of seeking to preserve the Latin meter and rhyme scheme.

I don’t own the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary, but I hear that it has a lot of errors.

I hope that the Breviary won’t turn out that way!:confused:

Has the price been released yet? I really hope that the price will be competitive with the 4 volume Liturgy of the Hours, but I do not see that happening.

No one knows the price yet.:frowning:

We have to wait until they get the Imprimatur with the Nihil Obstat before they list any price.

Seems to be that if the original had Nihil Obstat and Imprimatur, these would automatically extend to what is basically a reprint.

The Three volume set originally published by the Liturgical Press, Baronius is being re-translated into a more traditional english, and they have replaced the Pian Psalms with the Vulgate Psalter. If it had been a simple reprinting of the original they could have had it out two years ago.

As far as I can tell, the Pss are the same as in the original LP version.

If they were retranslating anything, they should have provided versions of the hymns that matched the Latin meter and rhyme–which are readily available.

The web page gives this overview.
•It is based on the popular three-volume Collegeville Breviary in Latin & English, originally published in 1963.
•Follows the text and rubrics promulgated by Blessed Pope John XXIII – the form of the traditional Breviary approved in Pope Benedict XVI’s Summorum Pontificum.
•St Jerome’s traditional Gallican psalter from the Vulgate is given in the text of all the hours.
•Scriptural texts in English follow the Confraternity translation (a 1940s revision of Challoner’s Douai-Rheims Bible), which have been thoroughly revised to conform to the Vulgate text.
•Extracts from the Rituale Romanum (including the most commonly used litanies) given in an appendix.
•Contains Penitential Psalms and the Office for the Dead.
•Prayer card to include common prayers in Latin and English.
•A copy of Learning the Breviary will be included.

The main reason I don’t use the copy I have is the Pian Psalter, I only really use my set to show Protestants, and Catholics infected by Protestant allegations that Catholics are forbidden to use the Scriptures, by showing the Mass and offuce as daily liturgical rites that are grounded in Scripture.

The main reason I don’t use the copy I have is the Pian Psalter, I only really use my set to show Protestants, and Catholics infected by Protestant allegations that Catholics are forbidden to use the Scriptures, by showing the Mass and offuce as daily liturgical rites that are grounded in Scripture.


**Precisely.

That’s one reason I like the traslations of the Festal Menion and Triodion by the now Metropolitan Kallistos Ware and the late Mother Mary of Bussy. They give most of the scriptural references and allusions in the services.**

Can someone give more information about the Pian Psalter?:slight_smile:

I can’t find anything with Google searches.:confused:

The Pian Psalter, is shorthand for the new translation of the Psalms that Pope Pius XII authorized for use in the Breviary. The task was originally given to the Benedictines, who were doing a splendid job of translating the Hebrew into the a more scholastic Latin than that of St. Jerome’s Vulgate. In part this was done as older texts had been found and the Latin of St. Jerome which was done while Latin was still a living language is less intelligible to those learning Ecclesiastical Latin today. The Benedictines were taking too long, and the project was handed off to the Jesuits. They did an excellent job of translating the Psalms, but unlike St. Jerome, the technically accurate Psalter was not very melodic, and was hard to chant in choir. Many rejected use of the Psalter because it was unframiliar, and difficult for some to pray. The Vulgate was allowed to be used as an option to the Pian Psalter. Both are good translations, the Pian for a Scholar to study the Psalms, and the Vulgate to pray or chant in choir.

Thank you for the knowledable response.

I also asked a Roman Breviary Yahoo Group (that I moderate) and we had a good discussion about the Pian Psalms.

groups.yahoo.com/group/TheRomanBreviaryGroup/message/1005

I’m confused about why they’re squeezing Ordinary Time into one volume instead of dividing 34 weeks between two volumes like the 4-vol. LOTH.Anyone have any ideas about this?

The combination of the Seasons After Epiphany and After Trinity Sunday (Pentecost) into “Ordinary Time” is an innovation of the Post Vatican II LIturgy (Mass and Breviary).

By my use of “innovation,” I do not intend this as a value judgement, but simply to say that it is something new.

The older LIturgy (including the new Breviary by Baronius Press) reflects the older use.

Has anyone else noticed that Baronius Press has removed the due date for the Breviary? It originally said that it was due out sometime late this year. It now gives no hint of when it will be released. I’m only left with the assumption that it has been delayed, yet again.

I hope not!

I think they’re waiting for the Nihil Obstat and Imprimatur.

Brev,

They’ve been waiting on the Imprimatur and Nihil Ostat. :shrug:

I’ll just keep chugging away on the LOBVM.

I bought the Anglican Breviary and the Monastic Diurnal, and will keep waiting…

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