Barry University


#1

Can anyone tell me about the theology and ministry programs at Barry University? I already have an MA in Theology and a Certificate in Spiritual Direction from a Jesuit College. I am interested in getting a DMin degree so I can teach in our diocese's ministry formation program. But it is important that the degree come from a reputable school with a solid foundation in Catholicism.


#2

[quote="mcgregorj, post:1, topic:212320"]
Can anyone tell me about the theology and ministry programs at Barry University? I already have an MA in Theology and a Certificate in Spiritual Direction from a Jesuit College. I am interested in getting a DMin degree so I can teach in our diocese's ministry formation program. But it is important that the degree come from a reputable school with a solid foundation in Catholicism.

[/quote]

A friend of mine (a nun) went there and they definitely teach against the Catholic Church doctrine, as far as she was concerned.

The nuns that teach are feminist with very few exceptions, and the "priests" who teach there are not much better. She noted that most of the students left the Catholic Church when they finally graduated.

Why don't you look at some of the truly Catholic colleges like the Franciscan one in Ohio? Or Ave Maria University? There are now about a handful of truly Catholic Universities. I would look at some that are advertised in "The Catholic Register" and also in "The Sunday Visitor". If you want a good Catholic foundation, please stay away from Barry University. My friend almost lost her faith there.


#3

Truly Catholic universities are few and far between, but to be a good teacher, you should seek them out and get your education there.

Check out Catholic University of America–it’s GREAT! That’s where I did my masters work, and it was totally solid without being judgmental or stifling. I’ve heard great things also about University of Dallas, where many of my friends went before coming to CUA. Both schools are orthodox and wonderful, and you would be a credit to any parish you served armed with a degree from these schools.

Also of interest, the Cardinal Newman society publishes a report about colleges that are true to Catholic teaching and character, a lot of them that I’m not familiar with, but if they get their approval, they’ve GOT to be good. Check it out here:

thenewmanguide.com/TableofContents/tabid/506/Default.aspx

Best of luck!!


#4

If you want a lesson in Catholic Catechism you should definitely go with the Newman Society suggestion. However, if you want to learn to THINK theologically, to EXAMINE deeply theological and spiritual issues, the human person and our relationship to God, then Barry would be a place for you. In short, if you want to BE a theologian, Barry would be a good place to do this.

I find it surprising that a previous response mentioned that "most of the students left the Catholic Church when they finally graduated." I wonder how this survey was done. In fact, the program is open to Christians of all denominations, (and even non-Christians) who want to study within a Catholic context) so it's quite likely that many were not Catholic even while they were there.
The program offers concentrations in scripture, systematics, morals or liturgy, so you can specialize. They also offer a concentration in Hispanic/Latino theology & ministry. With the growing hispanic population in this country, this could be extremely valuable preparation for future practical ministry.


#5

Not to turn this into a debate, but I would respectfully disagree with Athiker. During my time at Catholic U, I was forced to think very deeply about our faith and read a wide variety of literature that challenged me and prepared me to work in ministry. It was not merely lessons in the Catechism (although, to be fair, there is certainly more than enough in the Catechism to keep most people absorbed for a lifetime). It is unlikely that learning to truly understand the Catechism would condemn you to be a light weight theologian, I dare say.

Off topic but…I am unsure if all those interested in ministry have to be theologians or think like theologians; I would say there actually seems to be some tension between theology and ministry. At least, there is a certain lack of pastoralism that comes with being incredibly theologically learned by and large. Perhaps one of the few people to escape that is the late Pope John Paul II, but I am unsure we are all so lucky.

Nevertheless, CUA offers an MDiv degree with a concentration in Hispanic ministry–indeed they offer an MDiv IN ministry studies, if that is what you were interested in.

You can check out their ministry programs at: trs.cua.edu/academic/grad/pastoralstudies/index.cfm

Lastly, I would add that Barry was founded by the Dominican Sisters of Adrian, Michigan. Although it is now run by a lay counsel, their foundresses align themselves with NETWORK and the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, the latter of which is currently under investigation for its support of women’s ordination and homosexuality. They are also allied with 8th Day Center for Justice, as you can see here 8thdaycenter.org/aboutus/members.html, which is completely off the reservation in terms of what they teach, believe, etc. I don’t know who this woman is, but her criticism seems like it might shed some light on these sisters: lhla.org/newage/?p=133

It would seem that Barry University (from what I can learn from them) follows in their footsteps in keeping the Catholic name, but none of its character, and in only presenting its teachings as one of many possibilities. I can also say I am from Florida, but in my search for a Catholic school, I never even heard Barry mentioned by anyone in my state–only Ave, in Naples. I didn’t even know Barry was considered even *loosely *Catholic…but these days, it seems just about anyone can claim that title.


#6

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