Becoming a Priest in another Country


#1

Hi everybody!

I'm new to the forums, and I strongly believe that the Lord is calling me to be a priest. However, I am Canadian (and a convert!) , and through long periods of prayer and inner discernment, I believe I am called to be a priest in the US. What are dioceses' policies on this? Do I have to be living in the diocese for a certain length of time, and then they treat me as they would a regular citizen in regards to the next steps? Or is there a different way they go about doing it?

Thank you, and God Bless you,

Gerald T.


#2

Different diocese have different policies. Our diocese sometimes has seminarians from other countries but they are almost all ordainded to go back thier home country rather than stay here after ordination.

I would recommend you investigate a few dioceses to find some you are interested in and then contacting the vocations director for each. Don't forget the religious orders as well.

One other thought. Who are you working with for your discernment? If that person is attached to your own diocese, he should be able to help you find contact information.


#3

You would have to contact the Bishop in the Diocease you are interested in and go form there.

Linus2nd


#4

The key question any diocese would ask is why are you applying to them, as opposed to your "home" diocese. It's certainly not impossible although some dioceses are more accommodating than others.

So, for example, if you work in the diocese you're considering applying to and regularly go to mass there because it's closer. Or you it could be where you grew up, or where you're currently living / studying. Any of those examples would probably be a satisfactory answer to the "why" question. On the other hand, something like "diocese x has a nicer cathedral than diocese Y", or "diocese X is an arch diocese" really aren't likely to convince a vocations director. Living in the diocese obviously helps but may not be necessary as long as you can demonstrate some connection or familiarity with it - liking working or studying there. Without this, it's less likely that a diocese would accept you but not impossible (again, much depends on the individual diocese and / or its bishop).

Basically, every priest is attached to a diocese (or religious order) - this is more than just a matter of geography, seminarians are expected to develop a bond with your diocese and its priests.

The other thing you should be aware of is that not every country (or indeed every seminary) follows the same programme for training - so transferring is far from a straight forward process.

Ultimately, what you need to bear in mind that, for you, discernment isn't just about the "what" (i.e. priesthood) it's also about "where" and "why" - you need to discern which diocese you feel called to and why, as much as you need to discern the call to diocesan priesthood itself. Speaking from experience, my advice to you is to pray: listen to God speaking in your heart and you should find the answers.


#5

Hi everybody!

I'm new to the forums, and I strongly believe that the Lord is calling me to be a priest.
However, I am Canadian (and a convert!) , and through long periods of prayer and inner discernment, I believe I am called to be a priest in the US.

Hi and welcome too!

In order to discern correctly, you need a spiritual director like a priest or religious person you feel comfortable with since discerning correctly can be tricky especially by yourself

Also, some bio might be helpful
1. How long since you converted?
2. Your age
3. Why US and not Canada?

What are dioceses' policies on this? Do I have to be living in the diocese for a certain length of time, and then they treat me as they would a regular citizen in regards to the next steps? Or is there a different way they go about doing it?

Most I have heard of require residency and practice for a couple of years

May God bless you on the start of your discernment journey!


#6

Thank you for all the answers, everybody!

I converted a little over two years ago.
I am 20 years old.
I believe that God has been pushing me to the US for quite some time now. For as long as I can remember, especially since I was received into the Church, I have felt a pull towards the US. When I visit I enjoy it there, but that's not the reason I want to be there. I want to be there because it was once such a great nation, and ever since secularism has hit it, you can almost feel God's displeasure with the nation. I want to serve The Lord and become one of his priests there so I can help bring people back to God, who is the Way, the Truth, and the Light.

I have just emailed a couple Vocations Directors. Does anyone know when I should expect to hear back from them? I'm really feeling the Holy Spirit now :D


#7

In our Sacramento diocese, almost all priests that were ordained in the last few years were Mexican nationals so I don't foresee a problem with your moving down to the lower 48 to pursue your vocation!:thumbsup:


#8

It all depends on how much information you gave and are seeking. :slight_smile:

You might find it less stressful if you work through the vocations director in your own diocese. Most of the foreign national seminarians (that I have heard of) are sponsored by their own diocese. Not necessarily sponsored monetarily but the home diocese does a lot of the early work - paper work, making sure the educational requirements are met, etc.


#9

Thank you!

Does anyone know of any dioceses in the US that do take applications from other countries?


#10

Given the size of the US and its diversity, any diocese may well want to know what attracts you to their diocese, as opposed to the country generally, because that diocese is where you would be for pretty much the rest of your days. They're also likely to ask why not Canada, and your home diocese in particular? If you've never spent any time in the diocese(s) your applying to then that could also be another problem. I'm not saying that these sorts of things would mean that you wouldn't be considered but they are questions / issues which will likely crop up along the way.


#11

[quote="GeraldThomas1, post:9, topic:331440"]
Thank you!

Does anyone know of any dioceses in the US that do take applications from other countries?

[/quote]

Not all dioceses have their own seminaries. But of those that do, I don't know any that do NOT accept applications from men outside this country. But, like has been said earlier, they all have different processes. Some may want the application to come through your local office.


#12

Here in the USA we need priests especially in the mid western states.
But it seems that Canada needs priests especially with only 8000 estimate of priests.
Become a religious priest! The Jesuits are known for sending people globally.

Go for whatever God is calling you to do :thumbsup:


#13

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