Being a bride of Christ


#1

This is something I’m still trying to understand…

who can be called a bride of Christ: only nuns/Sisters, or any person with a vow of chastity? or only a public vow of chastity? I’m speaking of perpetual vows.

I understand Consecrated Virgins have the title of “bride of Christ” in a special way and I’m not arguing that.

But considering that Our Lord called others who were vowed to Him as His brides, (like in revelations to the Saints), and considering that nuns/Sisters can share in that spirituality, - can we say that?

what about consecrated people in the world?

The reason I’m asking this is because some women feel a call to their vocation in these terms… there can be other ways too but there are many like this. thanks :slight_smile:


#2

Most of the sisters I know do not resonate with this concept.


#3

well it’s just a question I’m interested in :slight_smile:


#4

CCC 808 The Church is the Bride of Christ: he loved her and handed himself over for her. He has purified her by his blood and made her the fruitful mother of all God’s children.

CCC 796 The unity of Christ and the Church, head and members of one Body, also implies the distinction of the two within a personal relationship. This aspect is often expressed by the image of bridegroom and bride. The theme of Christ as Bridegroom of the Church was prepared for by the prophets and announced by John the Baptist. The Lord referred to himself as the “bridegroom.” The Apostle speaks of the whole Church and of each of the faithful, members of his Body, as a bride “betrothed” to Christ the Lord so as to become but one spirit with him. The Church is the spotless bride of the spotless Lamb. “Christ loved the Church and gave himself up for her, that he might sanctify her.” He has joined her with himself in an everlasting covenant and never stops caring for her as for his own body:

This is the whole Christ, head and body, one formed from many . . . whether the head or members speak, it is Christ who speaks. He speaks in his role as the head (ex persona capitis) and in his role as body (ex persona corporis). What does this mean? “The two will become one flesh. This is a great mystery, and I am applying it to Christ and the Church.” And the Lord himself says in the Gospel: “So they are no longer two, but one flesh.” They are, in fact, two different persons, yet they are one in the conjugal union, . . . as head, he calls himself the bridegroom, as body, he calls himself “bride.”

CCC 789 The comparison of the Church with the body casts light on the intimate bond between Christ and his Church. Not only is she gathered around him; she is united in him, in his body. Three aspects of the Church as the Body of Christ are to be more specifically noted: the unity of all her members with each other as a result of their union with Christ; Christ as head of the Body; and the Church as bride of Christ.


#5

The Church is the Bride of Christ.

We, through baptism, are the body of the Church. Therefore we are all the Bride of Christ.
The Church is the Bride of Christ

vatican.va/archive/ccc_css/archive/catechism/p123a9p2.htm

796 The unity of Christ and the Church, head and members of one Body, also implies the distinction of the two within a personal relationship. This aspect is often expressed by the image of bridegroom and bride. The theme of Christ as Bridegroom of the Church was prepared for by the prophets and announced by John the Baptist.234 The Lord referred to himself as the "bridegroom."235 The Apostle speaks of the whole Church and of each of the faithful, members of his Body, as a bride “betrothed” to Christ the Lord so as to become but one spirit with him.236 The Church is the spotless bride of the spotless Lamb.237 "Christ loved the Church and gave himself up for her, that he might sanctify her."238 He has joined her with himself in an everlasting covenant and never stops caring for her as for his own body:239
This is the whole Christ, head and body, one formed from many . . . whether the head or members speak, it is Christ who speaks. He speaks in his role as the head (ex persona capitis) and in his role as body (ex persona corporis). What does this mean? "The two will become one flesh. This is a great mystery, and I am applying it to Christ and the Church."240 And the Lord himself says in the Gospel: "So they are no longer two, but one flesh."241 They are, in fact, two different persons, yet they are one in the conjugal union, . . . as head, he calls himself the bridegroom, as body, he calls himself "bride."242

My Priest is teaching us this atm.


#6

Most of the sisters I know do relate to this image.
Consecrated persons are an image of what shall be.
This spousal image is important for us as consecrated persons.
We are to live in close union with Christ, our spouse.
ourfranciscanfiat.wordpress.com/tag/consecrated-chastity/


#7

You make a good point…however they have already discerned, and are already sisters. I have a dear friend who is a very good woman, sincere Catholic, but she had a mental issue which caused her to believe she WAS a bride of Christ, literally, to the point where she told her husband, “too bad” Jesus wants to marry me. I heard Him tell me. It broke her eventually, she spent time in a mental institution, her marriage broke up, and her children have pretty much left her alone since. She’s living happily under medication, and has not abandoned her faith despite her children turning away. In short, sometimes this kind of language needs to be put in proper context, as you have. Lay persons need a STRONG spiritual director and Vocations Director to help with such discernment .
God bless you.


#8

Thanks for the replies… well I’m asking particularly not just about nuns/Sisters, and not about lay people in general (because even though each soul is like a bride of Christ, that is meant in a different way) - but about consecrated people in the world who live with a perpetual vow of chastity… can they be called brides of Christ in some sense?


#9

Each soul is like a bride of Christ in a way, but in a different way than religious… maybe she misunderstood that to mean that she couldn’t be married to her husband anymore to have any type of spousal relationship with God. From what I read, lay married people can share in this spirituality to an extent, but it’s again in a different way… I’m wondering specifically about those who are not married and who have made a vow of chastity, either as religious or as consecrated people in the world, and who felt called to this vocation specifically through this spirituality? do you have any thoughts on that? I am aware of Sisters being called brides of Christ but I’m not sure if consecrated people in the world are too…

I totally agree about spiritual / vocations directors - very important


#10

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