Being silent during mass


#1

ok? I do not sing along or say out loud the prayers, I just say them to myself. Im happy too be there its just im not the kind of person that likes to sing along or anything.


#2

As long as you are paying attention and joining your prayers to those of the priest as he offers the Mass, it's fine.


#3

Ditto! :thumbsup:


#4

If I do sing, it's VERY quietly so as not to upset those around me. :D
I have a ROTTEN singing voice.
But I do pray aloud.
I think the important thing is that you're praying.


#5

[quote="IrishRush, post:4, topic:287500"]
If I do sing, it's VERY quietly so as not to upset those around me. :D
I have a ROTTEN singing voice.
But I do pray aloud.
I think the important thing is that you're praying.

[/quote]

We are told to make a joyful noise. We weren't told it had to be in tune. I'm thankful God isn't Simon Cowell or He'd send me home. :D


#6

Often times I will say the prayers but will sing either super quietly or not at all just because I can never find the right key! The lady who leads the singing sings in SUCH a high key that it’s almost impossible for me to sing on-key and I like to spare those around me from having to hear my shenanigans as I search for the right note, haha! :thumbsup:


#7

The voice that God gave me is the voice that I give Him back. If people are disturbed by the voice that God gave me then maybe they are disturbed by the face that He gave me as well. :D

Mass is a participation of the community and one doesn't have to bellow out in song or prayer as long as one is participating. I see folks who talk during the Mass and that cannot be participating unless they have the gift of bilocation. Silence is golden and if that is the way that you participate then so be it. I would suggest that you make your unsung prayers somewhat audible if you can. That is my two cents........


#8

As an organist, cantor, and [sometimes] choir director, I can tell you there are some people I wish wouldn't sing. It kind of ruins a lot of the work that goes into getting some people singing right. One or two people who are really off key or are seriously off tempo can hinder other people who are singing. I've heard a church singing the same piece at two different tempos before (yes, some people seem to be able to ignore the organ) and I'm not so sure I'd call it joyful noise, but more like a cacophonous racket.


#9

There are usually 2 reasons I don't sing. 1 is that my voice is horrible and I would be paid to shut up and not sing:D. The second reason I don't sing is that it seems like they want to sing EVERYTHING and I could do with a little more of the silence is sometimes golden thing. Just my 2 cents worth.


#10

:slight_smile:

To paraphrase something Blessed Mother Theresa said … when singing, we’re called to be faithful – not successful!


#11

Prior to my cancer surgery I had a decent voice and always sang in the choir. I feel your pain though. At least I’m on key. I just don’t have the range and power that I once had.


#12

[quote="The_Curt_Jester, post:8, topic:287500"]
As an organist, cantor, and [sometimes] choir director, I can tell you there are some people I wish wouldn't sing. It kind of ruins a lot of the work that goes into getting some people singing right. One or two people who are really off key or are seriously off tempo can hinder other people who are singing. I've heard a church singing the same piece at two different tempos before (yes, some people seem to be able to ignore the organ) and I'm not so sure I'd call it joyful noise, but more like a cacophonous racket.

[/quote]

I agree strongly with this.


#13

[quote="Rejoice_Always, post:10, topic:287500"]
:)

To paraphrase something Blessed Mother Theresa said ... when singing, we're called to be faithful -- not successful!

[/quote]

But in the liturgy, it's better to do something well, or not do it.


#14

[quote="superamazingman, post:13, topic:287500"]
But in the liturgy, it's better to do something well, or not do it.

[/quote]

I thought we were talking about parishoners, not choir members?

I've heard plenty of priests who couldn't carry a tune ...

ah, Father, during the Agnus Dei, would you please just, well, you know, not sing. If you can't do it well, don't. You understand, Father?


#15

[quote="Niji, post:1, topic:287500"]
ok? I do not sing along or say out loud the prayers, I just say them to myself. Im happy too be there its just im not the kind of person that likes to sing along or anything.

[/quote]

This is what the GIRM says about participation in prayer and song:

*Since the celebration of Mass by its nature has a "communitarian" character, both the dialogues between the priest and the faithful gathered together and the acclamations are of great significance; in fact, they are not simply outward signs of communal celebration but foster and bring about communion between priest and people.

The acclamations and the responses of the faithful to the priest's greetings and prayers constitute that level of active participation that the gathered faithful are to contribute in every form of the Mass, so that the action of the entire community may be clearly expressed and fostered.

In the rubrics and in the norms that follow, words such as "say" and "proclaim" are to be understood of both singing and reciting, according to the principles just stated above.

The Importance of Singing

The Christian faithful who gather together as one to await the Lord's coming are instructed by the Apostle Paul to sing together psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs (cf. Col 3:16). Singing is the sign of the heart's joy (cf. Acts 2:46). Thus Saint Augustine says rightly, "Singing is for one who loves."48 There is also the ancient proverb: "One who sings well prays twice."

Great importance should therefore be attached to the use of singing in the celebration of the Mass, with due consideration for the culture of the people and abilities of each liturgical assembly. Although it is not always necessary (e.g., in weekday Masses) to sing all the texts that are of themselves meant to be sung, every care should be taken that singing by the ministers and the people is not absent in celebrations that occur on Sundays and on holy days of obligation.*

I interpret this as meaning that we should engage to the best of our ability in particular with the spoken and/or sung responses betwen priest and congregation.


#16

Reluctance to sing I can understand. But the OP also stated that he/she doesn't even say the prayers aloud. That's harder to understand, and seems difficult to reconcile with "full, active, and conscious participation."


#17

[quote="Tarpeian_Rock, post:16, topic:287500"]
Reluctance to sing I can understand. But the OP also stated that he/she doesn't even say the prayers aloud. That's harder to understand, and seems difficult to reconcile with "full, active, and conscious participation."

[/quote]

Can silence at Mass be considered full, active, and conscious participation? I think so, for I don't think the decibel level of such participation is clearly stated (if you know what I mean).


#18

[quote="Tarpeian_Rock, post:16, topic:287500"]
Reluctance to sing I can understand. But the OP also stated that he/she doesn't even say the prayers aloud. That's harder to understand, and seems difficult to reconcile with "full, active, and conscious participation."

[/quote]

The OP indicated that he says the prayers to himself but not aloud. That's definately full, active and conscience participation. But even that is not essential. For example, if you attend a Mass in another language, you might say some of the responses in your own language in your head but you won't likely know/remember them all. That's ok. Sometimes all you need do is pay attention.


#19

our priests AND deacons are constantly scanning the congregation to see who is participating in the prayers and singing. so it would be awkward if at every Mass each time they gave you a glance you were just standing there or kneeling and not participating.
i guess you could say that you are there in spirit and sharing in the communal experience, although silent.


#20

[quote="7_Sorrows, post:19, topic:287500"]
our priests AND deacons are constantly scanning the congregation to see who is participating in the prayers and singing. so it would be awkward if at every Mass each time they gave you a glance you were just standing there or kneeling and not participating.
i guess you could say that you are there in spirit and sharing in the communal experience, although silent.

[/quote]

That's quite odd, if not a little intimating.


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